Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

An area with study groups for various languages. Group members help each other, share resources and experience. Study groups are permanent but the members rotate and change.
David1917
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby David1917 » Wed Feb 06, 2019 6:45 pm

Step 1: Acquire "Let's Learn Korean" by BJ Jones, complete.

This is the book Arguelles recommends beginning with, and I was able to get it from Interlibrary Loan. Not sure if I'll be able to complete it by the due date of 4/21, but I guess that ought to motivate me to get as much of it done as I can.

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Sayonaroo
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby Sayonaroo » Tue Mar 05, 2019 4:28 am

This is a free resource for learning Korean from folktales!

https://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/pdxopen/11/
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clemieclutalkie
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Joined: Tue Mar 05, 2019 9:06 pm
Languages: English (N), Chinese (HSK5), Japanese (N3), Korean (Topik 1)
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby clemieclutalkie » Tue Mar 05, 2019 9:16 pm

Hi guys! I'm brand new to this forum and to this thread! So excited to meet you all!

Why are you interested in Korean?
Because I'm attracted to Asian languages (in a not weird way). I just love the way it sounds, I love the complexity and I love that it's a critical language. I am all about critical languages!

What is your goal for this language?
I would like to be able to watch the news in Korean, understand politics and also entertainment. I'd like to watch tv shows (especially comedy shows) and understand without subtitles. I also plan to use Korean to make new friends and to use it in an academic settings for my future career.


Do you have a favorite Korean language song? If so, what is it? Embed the video in your post if you like.
Hard to say, but at the moment it's Blanket Kick by BTS. It's so underrated, yet so cute and catchy. The melody always makes me so happy!



What is your favorite feature of the Korean language that you've encountered so far in your studies?
The pronunciation. I LOVE the way the words sound as they come out of people's mouths! Something so flowy and yet to the point about it. I also love the way older people are addressed as uncle, aunt, older sister, older brother, etc even if they aren't related. It's like a family!
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meloncreme
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Languages: Tagalog, English, Korean
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby meloncreme » Fri Mar 22, 2019 9:34 am

Why are you interested in Korean?

Well, I started learning Korean because I'm a fan of Korean drama and music. I didn't really have a concrete goal or plan when I started. The idea seemed really fun and interesting so I just started learning it.

What is your goal for this language?

I used to work with Koreans as a translator. I translated written Korean documents (e.g. speeches for events) then they went back to Korea and I didn't get to study or practice Korean that much since then so my skills are rusty now. My goal right now is to be able to interpret confidently without much difficulties for my former coworkers whenever they come here for an official visit. Since the discussion usually revolves around military, economy and sometimes, politics, I want to learn more vocabulary words that related to those topics.

Do you have a favorite Korean language song? If so, what is it?

This is a difficult question but the first thing that came to mind was this song by Bigbang called 'Last Dance'



What is your favorite feature of the Korean language that you've encountered so far in your studies?

I love the alphabets and how easy it is to learn and teach to someone else. Also, I love the sentence order/structure! I like it when I encounter sentences with complex structure which makes me go "wow, I didn't know we could say it in that order."
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Sayonaroo
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby Sayonaroo » Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:34 am

I found out a way to read korean on an android ereader with a pop up dictionary!

As far as I can tell, you cannot use a korean-English dictionary on a kindle. However the English-korean dictionary works beautifully.

https://choronghi.wordpress.com/2019/03 ... n-ereader/

Also I asked on reddit about ereaders and somebody mentioned using koreader on their kobo ereader

https://www.reddit.com/r/Korean/comment ... erm=b0s6h8
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eido
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby eido » Mon Apr 15, 2019 6:06 pm

I just bought a set of old-fashioned Korean books by Francis Park, called Speaking Korean. Has anyone used them?

Additionally, would anyone be interested in contributing to reviews of Korean resources in the appropriate thread, or even here?
David1917 wrote:Step 1: Acquire "Let's Learn Korean" by BJ Jones, complete.

How's this going? Is it a good resource?
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David1917
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby David1917 » Mon Apr 15, 2019 6:26 pm

eido wrote:I just bought a set of old-fashioned Korean books by Francis Park, called Speaking Korean. Has anyone used them?

Additionally, would anyone be interested in contributing to reviews of Korean resources in the appropriate thread, or even here?
David1917 wrote:Step 1: Acquire "Let's Learn Korean" by BJ Jones, complete.

How's this going? Is it a good resource?


It looked like a very good one by looking through the book. Unfortunately, the tape it came with was worn down so badly as to be completely unusable, so I never began working with it. I took it as a sign to hold off on trying to work with Korean for now - as I added in Arabic already and also need to get up to a higher reading level in German before starting my Master's.

In this thread, Prof A suggests using that Francis Park series so, I'd say you made a wise purchase.
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Axon
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby Axon » Tue Apr 16, 2019 2:27 pm

A Korean family has opened a cozy little cafe a few minutes from my apartment. They speak some English and good Mandarin but I would like to learn a couple of polite phrases in Korean to order food, pay, and thank them. It's clear that if I could speak Korean, we would use Korean - they're far more comfortable in Korean than other languages.

I can't realistically get any kind of Pimsleur or Teach Yourself shipped to me here in China. This week I'll have the chance to go to a bookstore and check out some courses from a Chinese base.

At this point, I'm only concerned with this one very specific aspect of the language, though of course I know it would serve me well to have a basic foundation. What are some free online audio-based resources that can help me with polite "transactional" Korean? And, taking into account what you folks know about Korean, should I start by memorizing cafe phrases or start with general beginner materials?
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Chung
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby Chung » Tue Apr 16, 2019 3:33 pm

Axon wrote:A Korean family has opened a cozy little cafe a few minutes from my apartment. They speak some English and good Mandarin but I would like to learn a couple of polite phrases in Korean to order food, pay, and thank them. It's clear that if I could speak Korean, we would use Korean - they're far more comfortable in Korean than other languages.

I can't realistically get any kind of Pimsleur or Teach Yourself shipped to me here in China. This week I'll have the chance to go to a bookstore and check out some courses from a Chinese base.

At this point, I'm only concerned with this one very specific aspect of the language, though of course I know it would serve me well to have a basic foundation. What are some free online audio-based resources that can help me with polite "transactional" Korean? And, taking into account what you folks know about Korean, should I start by memorizing cafe phrases or start with general beginner materials?


Try DLI Headstart Korean

It's a good example of a typical survival course for military personnel (and their families) when they need to deal with locals. Audio is of decent quality overall, and if you put in the work you can build a small but useable repertoire of vocabulary fairly quickly.

A couple of notes are that it's all romanized (*eeeewwww*) and the register is pretty damned formal, in addition to being polite even though I think that these Koreans would be happy to hear any foreigner put in a good effort to speak Korean even if it's pretty formal. Among Koreans (especially in Seoul) it's quite common to encounter something less formal but still polite even in situations where you might think that the more formal register is appropriate.

For something more substantial, and if you don't mind learning online, then try out Korean From Zero (all three volumes are available to use for free online but only the 1st volume is available as a complete free download. If you want the other two volumes, only their audio is a free download; the books aren't free.)

There is some good discussion here about beginners' material for Korean.
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eido
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby eido » Tue Apr 16, 2019 4:54 pm

Axon wrote:What are some free online audio-based resources that can help me with polite "transactional" Korean? And, taking into account what you folks know about Korean, should I start by memorizing cafe phrases or start with general beginner materials?

I don't know necessarily about audio-based resources...

TTMIK is based on podcasts, but they talk a lot and take a long time to get to the point. When they do, it can be cursorily done. The PDFs are the most helpful. They have both romanization and Hangul the last time I looked. They have both free and paid content.
I liked Coursera's courses when I first started out. If Coursera is available in China, it might be a good resource to use. I understand since you asked for audio-based courses you may not want to learn to read Hangul, but it can be pretty easy. If this family lists their menu items in Hangul, it might impress them if you showed them your Hangul reading fluency -- even if it was just reading '카페라떼'. Coursera's courses cover Hangul and very basic shopping situations, like using numbers, a bit of bargaining, eating at a restaurant, and looking at clothes. Both courses are structured differently, and the 'second' (though really still basic and not any more advanced) assumes knowledge of Hangul. You can go through these courses at your own pace and I believe they're still free. They're both video-based, with quizzes interspersed throughout.
If Udemy is available in your country, there's a course another LLORG learner recommended upon a time called "Core Korean". If they're having one of their many sales, you can purchase all four courses in the series for $40-$50. The instructor is a native Korean and his English leaves something to be desired (as some of the translations of Korean sentences in the course seem to lack nuance), but the format of the course is very cool. This course is like an updated FSI/DLI that uses more relaxed drilling and less formal language. You don't have to know Hangul to use it, but it would be helpful. Since it's Udemy, the course is composed of a series of videos. The first course doesn't require you to really watch the screen while you work with it since the instructor goes through the concepts very deliberately in English and Korean, repeating often the important points. The teacher is very active on Udemy and answers any questions you may have. Though, of course, you might ask here and get an answer ;)

That's all I can think of for now.
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