Tagalog vs Cebuano

General discussion about learning languages
User avatar
baskerville
White Belt
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 8:41 am
Location: Budapest
Languages: Tagalog (Native), English (C2), Hungarian (B1), Japanese (N2), French (A1), German (A1), Spanish (A1)
x 6

Re: Tagalog vs Cebuano

Postby baskerville » Fri May 18, 2018 12:13 pm

Amen to that! ;)
sfuqua wrote:
One advantage you have about learning either language is the wonderful, supportive attitude Filipinos have for anybody trying to learn one of their languages. :D


I am a native Tagalog speaker but never learned any other Philippine language. I wanted to learn Ivatan but the resources are so limited. I like Tagalog because of the level of politeness that you can use depending on who you are speaking to.
1 x
Hungarian Tracker
Glossika Fluency 3: 9 / 104
Gyakorló Magyar Nyelvtan : 23 / 110
Duolingo: 51 / 78
Assimil: 7 / 85

German Tracker
Babbel Beginner 1: 11 / 23

User avatar
leosmith
Green Belt
Posts: 491
Joined: Thu Sep 29, 2016 10:06 pm
Location: Seattle
Languages: English (N)
Actively learning Tagalog (~B2)
Maintaining Spanish (~C1), Thai (~B2+), Russian (~B2+), French (~B2+), Mandarin (~B2), Japanese (~B2), Korean (~B2)
All but forgotten Swahili (~B1)
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=5054
x 1007

Re: Tagalog vs Cebuano

Postby leosmith » Fri May 18, 2018 5:04 pm

baskerville wrote:I like Tagalog because of the level of politeness that you can use depending on who you are speaking to.

Can you use po with ka? If you can, that would give you 3 levels to work with (ka, po+ka, po+kayo)... that's almost Japanesey! :D
0 x
https://languagetools.io/ - try our free multi-language reading tool

User avatar
baskerville
White Belt
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 8:41 am
Location: Budapest
Languages: Tagalog (Native), English (C2), Hungarian (B1), Japanese (N2), French (A1), German (A1), Spanish (A1)
x 6

Re: Tagalog vs Cebuano

Postby baskerville » Mon May 21, 2018 1:40 pm

leosmith wrote:Can you use po with ka? If you can, that would give you 3 levels to work with (ka, po+ka, po+kayo)... that's almost Japanesey! :D

Hello leosmith! :)
"Ka" is more familiar and does not take "po". Let's take the example of asking someone if he/she has already eaten. The levels of politeness would be:
Kumain ka na ba? (asking one person) / Kumain na ba kayo? (asking more than one person)
Kumain na po ba kayo? (asking one or more persons)
Kumain na po ba sila? (asking one or more persons)

Sila, as you already know, is 3rd person plural. But in this context, it is a very polite way of referring to someone you are speaking to.
0 x
Hungarian Tracker
Glossika Fluency 3: 9 / 104
Gyakorló Magyar Nyelvtan : 23 / 110
Duolingo: 51 / 78
Assimil: 7 / 85

German Tracker
Babbel Beginner 1: 11 / 23

User avatar
leosmith
Green Belt
Posts: 491
Joined: Thu Sep 29, 2016 10:06 pm
Location: Seattle
Languages: English (N)
Actively learning Tagalog (~B2)
Maintaining Spanish (~C1), Thai (~B2+), Russian (~B2+), French (~B2+), Mandarin (~B2), Japanese (~B2), Korean (~B2)
All but forgotten Swahili (~B1)
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=5054
x 1007

Re: Tagalog vs Cebuano

Postby leosmith » Mon May 21, 2018 4:53 pm

So you always need to use the plural personal pronoun with po? I did not know that, thanks.

I never use po in conversation, but people often use it when talking to me. In my defense, I almost always "out rank" my conversation partner; I'm older or I'm the customer. What about male vs female - do women tend to use po more often then men?
0 x
https://languagetools.io/ - try our free multi-language reading tool

Online
User avatar
Iversen
Black Belt - 1st Dan
Posts: 1849
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:36 pm
Location: Denmark
Languages: Monolingual travels in Danish, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Romanian and (part time) Esperanto
Ahem, not yet: Norwegian, Afrikaans, Platt, Scots, Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Albanian, Greek, Latin, Irish, Indonesian and a few more...
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1027
x 3755

Re: Tagalog vs Cebuano

Postby Iversen » Tue May 22, 2018 8:33 am

During my first and so far only trip to the Philippines I bought a small booklet named "Conversational English-Cebuano" by C.S. Canonigo. It is in principle a language guide of the same kind as those from Berlitz, Lonely P and others, but it has one advantage: it gives you a sentence or phrase, and then one more that resembles it, and then a third on etc. This means that you get a chance to make inferences about the mechanics of the language, unlike its competitors, who seem to be determined do make the sentences as different as possible (presumably in an attempt to cover more ground).

For instance "Give me a bit" is rendered as "Tagai ako'g diyutau..". And then the next three entries are "A bit more" (Diyutai pa"), "Bit by bit" and "By bits" (both "Sa tinagidyot"). And "Please, write me" ("Palihug, sulati ako") is followed by "Please, answer my letter" ("Palihug, balusi ang akong sulat"), So now I know that "me" and I" and "my" is "ako" or a variation of it ("Akong", "ako'g") , "Sulat" is letter and "Sulati" is write", "Tagai" is give (and the final -i makes it something like an infinitive, because "sulati" has the same thing).

I bought the book, but didn't go on to actually study the Cebuan language. I did study the formation of verbs in Tagalog, but my tiny Tagalog dictionaries turned out to be insufficient for real studies of the language. However in a bookstore in Manila I also bought - almost by chance - my best English <> Latin dictionary and a good Bahasa Melayu dictionary, and I have since also bought a somewhat larger Tagalog<>English one abroad, so one day I might have a second look at Tagalog - unless of course the English part of speech in the Philippines crowd out the Pilipino part.
1 x

Whodathunkitz
Green Belt
Posts: 385
Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2016 7:40 pm
Languages: English (N), Cebuano (basic spoken daily, best L2), Spanish (beginner, but can read), Esperanto (beginner and not maintained)
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=5133&start=30
x 254

Re: Tagalog vs Cebuano

Postby Whodathunkitz » Tue May 22, 2018 4:25 pm

Iversen wrote:During my first and so far only trip to the Philippines I bought a small booklet named "Conversational English-Cebuano" by C.S. Canonigo. It


Someone turned much of the vocab into a Memrise course. I have the book. I may revisit it some time.
0 x
2018 Cebuano SuperChallenge 1 May 2018-Dec 2019
: 150 / 600 SC days:
: 6 / 1250 Read (aim daily 2000 words):
: 299 / 9000 Video (aim daily 15 minutes):

User avatar
baskerville
White Belt
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 8:41 am
Location: Budapest
Languages: Tagalog (Native), English (C2), Hungarian (B1), Japanese (N2), French (A1), German (A1), Spanish (A1)
x 6

Re: Tagalog vs Cebuano

Postby baskerville » Wed May 23, 2018 8:11 am

Hmm, I would say it is about the same between men and women.

leosmith wrote: What about male vs female - do women tend to use po more often then men?
1 x
Hungarian Tracker
Glossika Fluency 3: 9 / 104
Gyakorló Magyar Nyelvtan : 23 / 110
Duolingo: 51 / 78
Assimil: 7 / 85

German Tracker
Babbel Beginner 1: 11 / 23


Return to “General Language Discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: dampingwire, Speakeasy, zKing and 1 guest