Swedish & Icelandic in pomodoros

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Ani
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Re: Swedish & Icelandic in pomodoros

Postby Ani » Mon Jun 11, 2018 3:17 am

Morgana wrote:
Been at 226 pages SV reading since last weekend or Monday. I did a little bit of reading last night but it didn't budge the %, it was that little. If I were "keeping pace" with the 8.2 pages required per day to stay on track for 5,000 after 20 months, I would be at 336 pages :lol:

SV films are better, 15.2. "Pace" would be 6.7 at this early stage, so no worries here.

I should just quit based off of where my reading is at, both because I'm skeptical I'll get caught up any time soon and because it would relieve me of feeling the pressure to get caught up.


Honestly, one super challenge worth of reading is hardly a super challenge. I'm sorry you're feeling pressure. You could honestly quit right now and start again in 10 months and still finish it. If you do stick it out, your pace will dramatically improve by the end. A gap of 100 pages is no big deal. Sometimes I think short binges are less stress then trying to do so many different things in a day :/
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Re: Swedish & Icelandic in pomodoros

Postby Morgana » Thu Jun 14, 2018 7:29 pm

Bab.la has some bugs to work out in their "context sentences" section:
Rådet bör upplysa Turkiet om att den dörr som har öppnats går att stänga igen om inte de mänskliga rättigheterna respekteras.Therefore, the Council is not yet able to provide the honourable Member with details of the timetable or an assessment of progress with regard to the European Youth Pact.

The Swedish sentence is actually in the context sentences section twice, and for the other occurrence it does have the correct translation. But obviously if one does not read through all of the sentences or read very carefully or if one is extremely new to Swedish then this section could lead one astray. It's too bad. Otherwise, Bab.la has been filling in a lot of gaps that Ord.se leaves.

(Thanks to arthaey for kindly posting the table code in her log for all us technologically-challenged folks.)

Ani's post above got me thinking about what I was trying to do everyday, and that it didn't make sense. I've now split up the components of my routine into different days, ie. reading through the week, watching on the weekends, etc. It's working out since I put it in place earlier this week as evidenced by the fact that I am no longer avoiding doing any work at all :P I'm also splitting things up in terms of intensive and extensive reading. It's very easy to accumulate a long list of new words or phrases so I'm only keeping such a list on certain days, and the other days I just don't! Oh, and uh yeah. I'm not going Anki-crazy just to get through the 5,000+ "new" reverse cards as I originally intended, because I tried that for two days last weekend and it was the pits, so I'm doing a more moderate approach while also adding in 20 actual new words every day.

My reading pace for Odinsbarn slowed down, I think the vocab set changed. But I hit 50% yesterday. I may just finish this book before the end of the summer. (And now that I've said that, it will take me to December :lol: :lol: :lol: )

Ditto on the Anki pace for Icelandic, there are so many words in each unit of Colloquial Icelandic but I just can't tolerate more than 20 new cards/day (40, with reverse cards, but they're the same cards so it's still only 20). I'm reviewing each unit again as I work through the vocab, because I didn't want to push forward with unit 4 and just be even more behind with Anki. Reviewing unit 1 again was very boring. It was an easy-ish unit the first time around too so I'm not surprised it's very boring the second time. However, I did pick up a couple of extra bits of information that I must have glossed over the first time through. It's such a small book but it's absolutely packed with information.

I've been watching Fréttir every night for at least 10 minutes, and a couple of nights this week they've had clips of Swedes talking about stuff (forget the first night, but last night it was about the World Cup), and it's funny because with Icelandic I'll catch a word every few sentences, maybe, but then the Swedish comes on and I'll of course default to futilely reading the subtitles in Icelandic because I don't realize it's about to be a Swedish clip. It takes my brain a second or two before I consciously register that "hey, this sounds familiar," and I stop reading and just listen. It is rather reassuring that listening to Swedish feels like a vacation compared to listening to Icelandic! (It better be by now, right??? ;) )

Speaking of the World Cup, I'm looking forward to catching as many matches as possible. Iceland and Sweden both qualified. Iceland for the first time ever. It's been an exciting time being an Iceland fan the last couple of years, since they qualified for the Euro in 2016. I'm German via my ancestry, so once Iceland and Sweden lose (sorry, but they always lose eventually) I default to cheering for Germany. It's easy to do since they win so much :twisted: But until then, áfram Ísland!
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Re: Swedish & Icelandic in pomodoros

Postby eido » Fri Jun 15, 2018 12:21 am

I know you probably couldn't read it because of the language my log was in, but I remembered a few Icelandic things from my teenhood.

Here's part of an Icelandic comedy I remember watching:

And here's part of the annual comedy special, Áramótaskaup:

Have you seen any of these?
I don't think I was able to watch the latter 'cause to my knowledge they never sub it.
Apparently I like to laugh. But I can't laugh if I'm not smart enough to get the joke. I can laugh if it's in another language, but only if it's screwball (I define this as 'screwy' - not 'battle of the sexes' as it's defined by film scholars) comedy like this (forgive the k-pop):

If you need context for the direct above, I can give it to you.
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Re: Swedish & Icelandic in pomodoros

Postby Morgana » Sat Jun 16, 2018 1:09 am

eido wrote:Have you seen any of these?

Nah, I haven’t watched anything in Icelandic before beginning my studies. I’m familiar with the New Year’s program by reading about it though. (Mostly I’m familiar with the annual fireworks Reykjavík does though :) ) Thanks for the rec’s though, I’ve now got a couple more things to check out when I’m a bit further along!

———

I had a really long and unintentional rant here but decided to re-write that into some kind of point-form... something. Voila:
  • Phrasal verbs! What are they?:
    So let’s talk about particle verbs. Technically, they’re called phrasal verbs and include prepositional verbs and particle verbs. If the phrasal verb uses a particle, it’s called a particle verb; if it uses a preposition, yup, you guessed it, it’s called a prepositional verb.
  • But how do I know it’s a phrasal verb and not just a verb with a preposition after it?:
    So how do you tell the difference? When speaking (and listening) one important thing to listen for is stress. What word is the stress put on? If the stress is on the verb, it is just a normal verb with a preposition. If the stress is on the particle, you’ve got yourself a particle verb.
  • But I’m reading, not listening!:
    Many dictionaries include the phrase “med betonad partikel,” which goes on to define the word if stress is put on the particle.
    Well... I guess that’s something I’ll have to look for next time I have to brave SAOB... :(
  • Here’s a list of phrasal verbs, possibly not exhaustive, and most of them lack definitions (rats).
The last bit of my original rant was about synonyms and Anki. SAOB (monolingual Swedish dictionary) is too opaque for me at this stage, I usually spend several minutes per word working out the abbreviations and translation of the definition given (heavy use of Google Translate which kind of defeats the purpose). But as usual, there’s a thread for that. I might be trying to run before I can walk. I think I’ll try some sentence cards from now on for synonyms, and not worry about SAOB. It will be a grand enough task using SAOB for the phrasal verbs!

ETA: prepositional verbs and particle verbs do not have the same point of stress

Edit 06172018: Deleted some stuff.
Last edited by Morgana on Mon Jun 18, 2018 2:47 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Swedish & Icelandic in pomodoros

Postby Neurotip » Sat Jun 16, 2018 10:44 pm

Morgana wrote:
If the stress is on the verb, it is just a normal verb with a preposition. If the stress is on the particle, you’ve got yourself a particle verb.

[*]But I’m reading, not listening!:
Many dictionaries include the phrase “med betonad partikel,” which goes on to define the word if stress is put on the particle.
Well... I guess that’s something I’ll have to look for next time I have to brave SAOB... :(

If you should happen across an Icelandic dictionary which makes that distinction, do let me know. The online dictionaries I use, namely wisc.edu and ordabok.is, are excellent but this is a major flaw of both. This became apparent to me the other day when I needed to look up 'koma fyrir'...
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Re: Swedish & Icelandic in pomodoros

Postby Morgana » Mon Jun 18, 2018 3:30 am

Interesting thread over on Reddit about language learning values:
Values. What do I mean by that? I mean, simply, writing down what you are trying to get out of the language. I think for some of us, this might be painfully obvious. But if you look at the questions asked here, I think a lot of the issues is that people don't know what they want. Why? Well, I think this is probably common in a lot of areas, but language in particular encompasses so much, and a lot of us first were exposed to language study in the worst environment possible: middle school language classes. People tend to take for granted what it means to study a language. But as I matured in my langauge studies, I realized that a key decision making tool was being explicit with my values.

Values really just means writing down what you want out of the language. They can and often will change, but serve as a key tool to force yourself to evaluate how decisions line up with the values.
This line stood out to me in particular:
When you aren't explicit with your values, you still have them, but they'll be defined by others, often by predominant ideas about how a language should be learned.
Still have to read through all of the comments. I did read some; I thought the OP did an excellent job of replying to someone learning German.

——

@Neurotip: I certainly will let you know if I find a good resource for Icelandic phrasal verbs. Ah, the joys of learning a language at the beginner or lower intermediate stages... being at the mercy of available L1 resources.

Edit: follow-up on that dictionary situation. Unfortunately this probably doesn’t help you, Neurotip, but I quickly checked koma fyrir in ISLEX and it’s there. Of course the trick with ISLEX is you need to know another North Germanic language! I will still look out for anything that translates to English.
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