Indonesian resources

All about language programs, courses, websites and other learning resources
Speakeasy
Black Belt - 2nd Dan
Posts: 2532
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2015 5:19 pm
Location: Canada (Montréal region)
Languages: English (N), French (C2). Studying: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Polish, and Russian; all with widely varying degrees of application, enthusiasm, and success.
x 6583

Indonesian resources

Postby Speakeasy » Tue Jan 05, 2016 2:28 pm

PARTS I and II
This list of resources was completely revised in March 2020 so as to incorporate the much-appreciated subsequent suggestions and comments by a number of forum members. During the revision, the list of categories was expanded to include grammars, dictionaries, phrasebooks as well as other resources which did not form part of the original lists. Many thanks to the contributors! Owing to the limitation on the number of characters that a post may contain, this presentation of Indonesian Resources has been separated into two parts.

PART I

Indonesia
Indonesia, officially the Republic of Indonesia (Indonesian: Republik Indonesi), is a transcontinental country in Southeast Asia and Oceania, between the Indian and Pacific oceans. It is the world's largest island country, with more than seventeen thousand islands, and at 1,904,569 square kilometres (735,358 square miles), the 14th largest by land area and 7th in the combined sea and land area. With over 267 million people, it is the world's 4th most populous country as well as the most populous Muslim-majority country. Java, the world's most populous island, is home to more than half of the country's population. The country's capital, Jakarta, is the second-most populous urban area in the world. The sovereign state is a presidential, constitutional republic with an elected legislature.

Languages of Indonesia
More than 700 living languages are spoken in Indonesia. A major part of them belong to the Austronesian language family, while over 270 Papuan (non-Austronesian) languages are spoken in eastern Indonesia. The official language is Indonesian (locally known as bahasa Indonesia), a standardised form of Malay, which serves as the lingua franca of the archipelago. The vocabulary of Indonesian borrows heavily from regional languages of Indonesia, such as Javanese, Sundanese and Minangkabau, as well as from Dutch, Sanskrit and Arabic. The Indonesian language is primarily used in commerce, administration, education and the media. Most Indonesians speak other languages, such as Javanese, as their first language. Most books printed in Indonesia are written in the Indonesian language. Since Indonesia recognizes only a single official language, other languages are not recognized either at the national level or the regional level, thus making Javanese the most widely spoken language without official status, with Sundanese the second in the list (excluding Chinese varieties). -- Source: Languages of Indonesia (Wikipedia)

Indonesian Language
Indonesian (bahasa Indonesia is the official language of Indonesia. It is a standardised variety of Malay, an Austronesian language that has been used as a lingua franca in the multilingual Indonesian archipelago for centuries. Indonesia is the fourth most populous nation in the world. Of its large population, the majority speak Indonesian, making it one of the most widely spoken languages in the world. Most Indonesians, aside from speaking the national language, are fluent in at least one of the more than 700 indigenous local languages; examples include Javanese, Sundanese and Balinese, which are commonly used at home and within the local community. However, most formal education, and nearly all national mass media, governance, administration, judiciary, and other forms of communication, are conducted in Indonesian. The term "Indonesian" is primarily associated with the national standard dialect (bahasa baku). However, in a more loose sense, it also encompasses the various local varieties spoken throughout the Indonesian archipelago.[4] Standard Indonesian is confined mostly to formal situations, existing in a diglossic relationship with vernacular Malay varieties, which are commonly used for daily communication. The Indonesian name for the language (bahasa Indonesia) is also occasionally found in English and other languages.

Study Group

Bahasa Indonesia untuk Dunia - Indonesian Study Group

Previous Discussions
It is unlikely that anyone is going to read through the over 2,600 discussion threads on the HTLAL and LLORG which touch upon the Indonesian language. Nevertheless, the following might be of interest to some readers of this file:

Indonesian Language – HTLAL - May 2006

Malay and Indonesian Resources – HTLAL -- November 2009

How Difficult Is Indonesian? - HTLAL - July 2010

Indonesian resources - HTLAL - January 2016

Indonesian & Javanese: Languages of Southeast Asia – Professor Arguelles on YouTube!


Indonesian Resources: LEGACY

Courses

An audio-lingual course in Bahasa Indonesia (1987) by H. Hendrata
Under the separate discussion thread "Audio lingual language programs", PeterBeischmidt made mention of this course: "I found an entry for what appears to be another audio-lingual course for Indonesian … They also seem to have the tapes, unless they've thrown them away without updating the catalogue.:

Code: Select all

Titel: An audio-lingual course in Bahasa Indonesia / H. Hendrata
Sonst. Personen: Hendrata, Hendy
Ort/Jahr: Carlton : Hendrata, [1987]
Land: Australien


Bahasa Tetanggaku: Stages 1 & 2: A Notional-functional Course In Bahasa Indonesia (1988) by Ian J. White

Beginning Indonesian (1960’s) - Isisodre Dyen
Beginning Indonesian, Vol. 1 (1960’s) - Isisodre Dyen
Beginning Indonesian, Vol. 2 (1960’s) - Isisodre Dyen
Beginning Indonesian, Vol. 3 (1960’s) - Isisodre Dyen
Beginning Indonesian, Vol. 4 (1960’s) - Isisodre Dyen
From the description available on the U.S. Government’s ERIC website, this course employed the audio-lingual method. I have not located the audio recordings which would have accompanied this course.

DLI Indonesian Basic, Refresher, etc. (1970’s)
In the 1970’s, the U.S. Armed Forces Defense Language Institute (DLI) published a collection of audio-lingual language courses for the study of Indonesian. The DLI Indonesian Basic course alone comprises over 1,500 pages of text and over 29 hours of audio recordings. Thanks to the efforts of several forum members, these materials are now freely available via the Yojik website.
Daristani wrote: … The DLI Basic Indonesian Course … has been found and made available online for free and legal download. I noted this in an entry on another thread https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 626#p89626 and now forum stalwart Expugnator has sent the materials to the Yojik site, where they can be downloaded: [url= https://fsi-languages.yojik.eu/language ... esian.html
]DLI Indonesian[/url] …
FSI Indonesian Basic Course (1959)
Daristani wrote: … Regarding other public-domain materials, it's evident that the Foreign Service Institute produced an Indonesian Newspaper Reader [see Readers & Related Materials]. It seems that FSI produced a two-volume, 60-unit "Indonesian Basic Course" as well in 1959. I see little mention of this on-line, but my local university library seems to have a copy of it in an auxiliary library facility (evidently used for books that don't circulate very often). I'm hoping to get this after Christmas, and if so, will try to scan it for eventual posting on-line, on the assumption that it's in the public domain just like the other FSI courses. As rare as the books seem to be, the audio is probably even rarer, but I have a sneaking suspicion that the audio Speakeasy found on the Indiana University CeLT website just MIGHT be associated with the FSI course. (The audio-lingual format at least sounds similar, although it appears that the CeLT materials don't extend to the full 60 units of the books.) Whether or not my surmise is valid will only become clear if and when I can get my hands on the books
Daristani wrote:Further to my above message, I regret to advise that my local university library only has volume two of the FSI "Indonesian Basic Course"; volume one has evidently been missing for quite some time. Accordingly, I can't determine whether the audio on the Indiana University CeLT site goes with this course, and I won't be scanning the book, as volume two without either volume one or the audio seems relatively useless.

Should anyone else be interested in tracking down the books in question, the only other libraries listed as having copies are Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah; the Fuller Theological Seminary Library in Pasadena, California; and the International Islamic University in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, so they don't seem to have been very broadly distributed. The audio is presumably at least as rare.
Indonesian Series (revised, 1990’s) by John Wolff - Cornell University, Southeast Asia Program Publications
In the 1970’s, Cornell University published a series of texts by John Wolf for the study of Indonesian. It is highly likely that these courses employed the audio-lingual method of instruction. The courses were very well received. Unfortunately, some of the Amazon Customer Reviewers of the revised editions complained that there was a technical issue with the accompanying DVD which contained the audio files. I do not know whether or not this issue was ever resolved and I suggest that anyone interested in learning Indonesian, send an Email to Cornell asking them about this problem. From my brief research, here is a list of the materials, which can be found on Amazon, AbeBooks, the Cornell University Press, and elsewhere:
Beginning Indonesian Through Self-Instruction (Books 1,2,3)
Formal Indonesian
Indonesian Conversations
Indonesian Readings


Intensive Indonesian Program (1965) by Harsono & Baird
Indonesian Basic Course (Bahasa Dialect) (1960’s) – AUDIO Recordings – Indiana University CeLT
The website of the Indiana University CeLT Recorded Materials Archive hosts the AUDIO recordings for an “Indonesian Basic Course” which was most likely published in the 1960’s. In response to my request for more information, the CeLT staff advised : "Our old card catalog lists those materials simply as ‘Intensive Indonesian Program’ by Harsono & Baird, 1965." This is most definitely an audio-lingual course: dialogues, basic sentences, sentence-pattern drills. The Librarian for South Asian and Southeast Asian Studies, Indiana University, kindly replied to my subsequent enquiry advising me that they have no record of the afore-mentioned textbook. This is quite a shame as the audio recordings, which are about 15 hours in length, are of a very high quality. Perhaps a fellow member will offer to transcribe the recordings and provide an English translation, for posting on the FSI-Languages-Courses database.
Daristani wrote: … I have a sneaking suspicion that the audio Speakeasy found on the Indiana University CeLT website just MIGHT be associated with the FSI course. (The audio-lingual format at least sounds similar, although it appears that the CeLT materials don't extend to the full 60 units of the books.) Whether or not my surmise is valid will only become clear if and when I can get my hands on the books.
Linguaphone Indonesian (1970’s)
Linguaphone used to sell an Indonesian course which, is now out-of-print, comprising three books (textbook, handbook, course book) and either 4 or 6 audio cassettes. In recent years, the publisher has begun offering digitized copies of their courses dating as far back as the 1950’s. Please submit requests directly to the publisher. Otherwise, consult the websites of resellers.
Adrianslont wrote:… Linguaphone: It's from the seventies as there are references to hippies! There are forty lessons and I used it as my first course, though I was a false beginner. Pretty good first course; there's a story thread over the forty units and the storyline and characters are interesting enough. I think it's well graded and the topics and language are good if a little formal. Each unit has a conversation of two or three minutes and some audio-lingual exercises. I don't really like drills so edited them out and just used the conversations. I did my own thing with them, listening to them repeatedly in the car, and also reading the pretty good language and cultural notes that come in the book at home. I sometimes did transcribing and sometimes made Anki cards with audio. After thirty units I got a bit bored with it and just listened to the last ten units in the car. It served me well but sometimes the voice acting is pretty stilted. Other times it's fine.
RAAF Indonesian Language Course (1982) - Royal Australian Air Force School of Languages
Please refer to the entry on PAGE 2 of this file. The RAAF School of Languages began in the 1940s and over the years has trained Australians who went on to be very actively involved in the region.

Spoken Indonesian: Beginning Indonesian (1986?), 906 pages, by John U. Wolff, Dede Oetomo, et al. - Spoken Language Services Inc
I have listed this item with a view to dispelling some possible confusion. The Spoken Language Services (SLS) “Spoken Indonesian” course was a REPRINT of the Beginning Indonesian by John U. Wolff, Dede Oetomo, et al., which was initially published by Cornell University (see listings above).

Sentence Patterns of Indonesian (1978), 434 pages, by Soenjono Dardjowidjojo -- PALI language Texts - University Press of Hawaii
Sentence Patterns of Indonesian (1978) AUDIO CASSETTES
Editor’s description: "Comprehensive presentation of the linguistic system of Indonesian, intended for use in first and 2nd year courses. Despite an initial appearance of being easy to learn, Indonesian has a complex system of affixes that must be mastered before acceptable sentences can be constructed. A major effort of this book is therefore devoted to providing understanding of these affixes, especially those used to form verbs and nouns, and their ramifications in sentence construction. The author's approach to understanding is oral-aural; patterns of structure are immediately followed by extensive drills and other exercises after being introduced. Each chapter also includes sections on pronunciation and useful notes on behavior according to Indonesian culture patterns.". The University Press of Hawaii once offered the audio cassette tapes to accompany this course. In late January 2016, in response to my enquiry, the University of Hawaii Press confirmed that they no longer have copies of audio recordings in any format.

Indonesian Resources: CONTEMPORARY I

Courses (English base)

Authentic Indonesian video (text + 3 videotapes)
This text & 3-video set presents 20 intermediate to advanced lessons based on authentic programming and featuring language-learning activities with a key for self-correction

Bahasa Indonesia Book 1: Introduction to Indonesian Language and Culture (1996), 388 pages, by Yohanni Johns
Bahasa Indonesia Book 2: Introduction to Indonesian Language and Culture (1996), 288 pages, by Yohanni Johns
The editors of this two-volume course, which serves as a standard in many universities, describe it as being: “completely self-contained, providing clear explanations of all basic grammar points. It may be used as a comprehensive series of lessons conducted by an instructor or for self-study. Extensive notes on usage and etiquette as well as copious practical examples make it suitable as an in-depth introduction to both the language and the culture of Indonesia … accessible to those who wish to master the language … at the intermediate and advanced levels.” The Amazon Customer Reviews are quite positive. Unfortunately, I have been unable to locate audio recordings for this course.

Basic Indonesian: An Introductory Coursebook (2010), 288 pages, by Stuart Robinson et al. - Tuttle Publishing[/url]

Beginning Indonesian – University of Victoria, British Columbia [url]http://web.uvic.ca/lancenrd/indonesian/


Colloquial Indonesian (2004) by Sutanto Atmosumarto – Routledge (Taylor & Francis)
Colloquial Indonesian (2004) AUDIO Recordings - Routledge (Taylor & Francis) website
Generally speaking, the Routledge Colloquial series has been well received, provided that the students understand that the scope of these courses is often limited to meet the basic communication needs of a traveller; that is, CEFR A0. Although the Amazon Customer Reviews for this course average about three stars, the complaints seem rather superficial.

Cambridge IGCSE Bahasa Indonesia Coursebook (2016), 216 pages.
Cambridge IGCSE Bahasa Indonesia Teacher's Guide (2016), 126 pages.
by Sofia Sinaga and Basuki, published by Cambridge University Press

Complete Indonesian (2nd ed., 2010) by Christoper Byrnes, Eva Nyimas – Teach Yourself Books
Overall, the Teach Yourself series of introductory language courses has been well-received. In the case of the Complete Indonesian course, a couple of Amazon Customers have mentioned that the CD audio track numbers as printed in the course book are not well-synchronized with the actual tracks on the CDs.

Course in Conversational Indonesian: With Equivalent Malay Vocabulary (2002), 570 pages, by Malcolm W. Mintz - Indonesian / Malay Texts and Resources
Conceived for both classroom instruction and home study. The presentation dialogues are recorded on one audio CD which accompanies the book.

DLI Indonesian Headstart2 – U.S. Defense Language Institute
A “familiarization” course (not a phrasebook), somewhat similar to the Routledge Colloquial series in scope, but which also includes some military terminology. Access is free.

DLI SOLT Indonesian (circa 2000) – U.S. Defense Language Institute
abejo wrote:Hello, everyone. I have been trying to teach Indonesian to some adult learners. After trying some books and audio materials, I found that DLI SOLT I Indonesian a superb resource to help English-speaking learners to learn Bahasa Indonesian. I simply add some introduction to how the language works as far as its word formations, basic sentence patterns and surely its pronunciation. Unfortunately, one pdf file is missing/corrupted from DLI SOLT - that is the manual for module 4 lesson 6. I have tried yojik, livelingua, jlu.wbtrain.com, yumpu.com, and even bought some CD/DVD off ebay without success. I wonder if anybody out there know the right place to find the missing file. Many thanks in advance.
Easy Indonesian: Learn to Speak Indonesian Quickly (Audio CD Included) (2013), 224 pages, by Thomas G. Oey and Katherine Davidsen

Fun! MOOC: Indonésien
Mista wrote:I'm currently doing the Arabic course from FUN, and today I got an email from them, which among other things informed of the following:
FUN wrote:L'arabe, le chinois et le tchèque vous sont actuellement proposés sur FUN. Sont ensuite programmés les MOOC de birman, turc, indonésien, hébreu, mazatec et malgache. Un MOOC de thaï est également en projet. Faites-le savoir autour de vous !
My experience with the Arabic course indicates that A2 in French is probably enough to follow these courses. The link to the website is https://www.fun-mooc.fr/

Indonesian for Beginners: Learning Conversational Indonesian (Free Online Audio) (2019), 208 pages, by Katherine Davidsen and Yusep Cuandani

Indonesian for NGOs & Relief Agencies (2015), 254 pages.
indonesian & Javanese for Professionals (2nd ed., 2013), 392 pages.
Both works by Don Hobbs, Galang Lufityanto, et al., published by Asian Lizard Languages

Kenalilah Indonesia 1: A Language and Culture Course (2001), by Linda Hibbs et al.
Kenalilah Indonesia 1: Audio and Teacher Support Pack
Kenalilah Indonesia 2: A Language and Culture Course (2003), by Linda Hibbs et al.
Kenalilah Indonesia 2: Audio and Teacher Support Pack (2003), by Linda Hibbs et al

Keren! Indonesian Course (2003) by Ian J. White – Pearson Education (Australia) / Cheng & Tsui
Publisher’s description: "Keren! is [a multi-level] Indonesian series for junior secondary students. Written for the LOTE national profiles, Keren! addresses the three strands of listening and speaking, reading and writing. This full colour book has a balance of content, clearly-explained grammar and cultural appreciation." Given the target audience (junior secondary students), the ferociously expensive proposition of acquiring the complete set of materials, coupled with the availability of other resources, this series is probably not a viable option for most adult independent learners of Indonesian.

Let's Speak Indonesia: Ayo Berbahasa Indonesia (2014), 212 pages, by Ellen Rafferty et al. – University of Hawaii Press

Mari belajar sopan santun Bahasa Indonesia
Filmed on location in East Java, Indonesia, the Mari Belajar Sopan Santun Bahasa Indonesia set consists of two videotapes, a manual, and extended notes on the individual video scenarios. The videos present interactions among Indonesian native speakers and foreign language learners as they engage in tasks and activities of everyday life. The purpose of the videos is to model for foreign language learners how to speak politely in Indonesian by drawing their attention to the ways language is used and the ways it varies according to the social context in which the interaction occurs. The manual accompanying the videos includes the pedagogical background of this project, sample lessons, learning focus, suggested activities, and bibliographies on Indonesian pragmatics and on the teaching of pragmatics in foreign language classrooms. A document containing extended notes on the videotaped scenarios is available at no charge online.

Pimsleur Indonesian – Simon & Schuster
Pimsleur presently offers a Level I course (30 units) for Indonesian.

The Indonesian Way by George Quinn and Uli Kozok - University of Hawaii
Adrianslont wrote:…The Indonesian Way: I've had a quick look at this course from the University of Hawaii and it looks pretty good. You seem to be able to do it online or download print, audio and premade Anki decks. And all free. If I hadn't started linguaphone I probably would have done this. Looks like quality and it's totally free! I hope there is someone on the forum who finds that all helpful!

U.S. Peace Corps Indonesian: Books 1, 2, 3
A set of well-prepared “familiarization” courses. Regrettably, there are no audio recordings accompanying these materials.

Courses (French base)

Assimil L'indonésien (2013) by Marie-Laure Beck-Hurault, Muhammad Abduh
This course is currently NOT available in ENGLISH. The customer reviews on Amazon.FR are, for the most part, quite positive.
Adrianslont wrote:… Assimil: I haven't been as a methodical with Assimil, mainly because I found something else I prefer. I did work through about the first twenty units, listening, listening and reading, reading the language and cultural notes. I've listened to later units for practice in the car. I think I will return to it at some point because I think it has something to offer. The language is a little more colloquial than Linguaphone and they even throw in some Javanese. How did I find it? Well, I managed to use it quite readily despite having what is probably only A2 French. I guess I had some Indonesian by then, though. Some lessons were better than others. Some seemed a little forced in order to cover some language point, others quite natural and occasionally humorous. I liked the voice actors and they sounded more everyday than the Linguaphone actors to me. 100 lessons.
Manuel d'indonésien : Volume 1, L'Indonésie au quotidien (2nd ed., 2015), 349 pages
Manuel pratique d'indonésien + 1 CD MP3 (2012), 320 pages.
Available from a FRENCH base only, by Jérôme Samuel et al., published by L'Asiathèquethis, this pair of self-instruction courses has been well-received by Amazon.FR customers.

Méthode d'indonésien (révisée 1998), 276 pages.
Exercices structuraux d'indonésien (+ coffret 3 CD) (2001), 192 pages
Available from a FRENCH base only, by Farida Soemargono, published by L'Asiathèque, this pair of self-instruction courses has been well-received by Amazon.FR customers.

Modernisation Lexicale Et Politique Terminologique: Le Cas De L'indonesien (2006), 589 pages, by J. Samuel - Peeters
Not a course; rather, an in-depth study of the modernisation of Indonesian specialized lexical terms. For Francophiles and Indonesianophiles alike. Did I just write Indonesianophiles?

Parlons indonésien: Langues et culture d'Indonésie (1997), 256 pages, by Anne-Marie Van Dyck – Éditions L’Harmattan
CD Parlons Indonesien
The sole Amazon.FR customer to review this course was quite satisfied. Regrettably, while the CD is still listed, it is no longer available on either the Amazon or the publisher’s websites.

Parlons javanais: Langues, Dialogues, Lexiques (2016), 412 pages, by Eric Sukanda et al. - Éditions L’Harmattan
La culture javanaise et son histoire (2014), 292 pages, by Eric Sukanda et al. - Éditions L’Harmattan

Parlons minangkabau: Sumatra (2004), 272 pages, by Rusmidar Reibaud - Éditions L’Harmattan

Parlons manadonais: Une langue des Célèbes (2008), 192 pages, by Chrisvivany Lasut - Éditions L’Harmattan

Parlons soundanais : Langue et culture (2007), 522 pages, by Viviane Sukanda-Tessier - Éditions L’Harmattan

Courses (German base)
Included here is a very small selection of materials from GERMAN base which include AUDIO recordings. The list also serves, once again, to illustrate that some Assimil courses are available in languages other than English (a market which I would assume represents a high potential).

Assimil Indonesich ohne Mühe
As might be expected, the Assimil Indonesian course was well-received by Amazon.DE customers.

Bahasa Indonesia - Indonesisch für Deutsche (Teil 1) (6th ed., 2001), 248 pages.
Bahasa Indonesia - Indonesisch für Deutsche (Teil 1) 7 Audio-CDs zum Lehrwerk
Bahasa Indonesia - Indonesisch für Deutsche (Teil 2) (3rd ed., 2006), 193 pages.
Bahasa Indonesia - Indonesisch für Deutsche (Teil 2) 4 Audio-CDs zum Lehrwerk
Bahasa Indonesia - Indonesisch für Deutsche: Wörterverzeichnis (5th ed., 2007), 81 pages.
All of the above authored by Bernd Nothofer and Karl-Heinz Pampus, published by Groos, Julius. I get the impression that these materials were conceived for use in a classroom setting and seem to have been well-received. Although the course manuals are accompanied by a total of 11 CDs of audio recordings (approx. 12 hours total duration), which might represent an interesting option for some students, the two Amazon customers who reviewed the CDs were not impressed by the sound quality.

Kauderwelsch Indonesisch Wort für Wort plus Wörterbuch (2nd ed., 2016), 340 pages.
Kauderwelsch Aussprachetrainer Indonesisch
Both by Gunda Urban, published by Reise Know-How. Not a complete course, rather a paired set of phrasebook and audio recordings. This series is generally well-received by Amazon.DE customers. The Wort für Wort booklet includes links to downloadable audio files (selected extracts from the text). The CD, which is available for separate purchase, includes more recordings than the downloadable files. [Mit Links zu Hörbeispielen mit denen man sich ausgewählte Sätze und Redewendungen aus dem Buch anhören kann. Umfangreicheres Tonmaterial ist unter dem Titel Kauderwelsch Aussprachetrainer Indonesisch separat auf CD oder als Download erhältlich.]

Courses (Dutch base)
It occurred to me that, as Indonesia was once a Dutch colony, there might be some interesting Dutch based resources for the study of the Indonesian language. To my surprise, there were only two items on Amazon.NL of any interest.

Indonesisch voor beginners (6th ed., 2010), 284 pages
Uitgesproken Indonesisch (3rd ed., 2010), 70 pages (includes 2 CDs)
These two items, authored by Harmani Jeanne Ham and published by Coutinho, form part of a basic introduction to Indonesian. The second part, Uitgesproken Indonesisch, contains the translations of the texts and the answers to the exercises which appear in the main course manual. The texts and pronunciation exercises from the course book are recorded on the two CDs enclosed in Uitgesproken Indonesisch.

Bahasa Indonesia: basiscursus Indonesisch (Part 1), Textbook, Indonesian Edition (2013), 244 pages
Bahasa Indonesia: basiscursus Indonesisch (Part 1), Workbook, Dutch Edition (2013), 111 pages
Belajar Bahasa Indonesia (Part 2), Textbook, Dutch Edition (2019), 354 pages
According to the publisher’s description, Bahasa Indonesia and its follow-up course, by Rahman Syaifoel, were conceived both for presentation in a classroom and for self-instruction. The materials of Part 1 consist of a textbook, a workbook and a website. Answers to the exercises appearing in the textbook are given at the back of the workbook. The sound files for the texts, pronunciation exercises and songs are located on the accompanying website; however, I have been unable to locate said website. I am not sure whether or not I have located all of the components of this collection but have listed what I have found because this was one of two course which I happened upon from a Dutch base and because it might be of interest to some students. To be quite frank, given the availability of so many other high-quality courses, I would not bother with this one.

Courses (Italian, Portuguese, Spanish bases)
As Portugal played an active part in the history of Indonesia, on the off chance that this heritage might have resulted in the publication of courses for the study of the language, I searched the Amazon.ES and Amazon.IT websites but came up rather short-handed.

Aprende Bahasa Indonésia: Indonésio para Hispanoblantes, Nivel Elemental (2013), 149 pages, by Fitra Ismu Kusumo - Rumah Jade Production

Corso di lingua indonesiana. Livelli A1-B1, Italiano (2019), 352 pages, by Fayzah Soenoto Rivai y Antonia Soriente - Hoepli

Indonesian Resources: CONTEMPORARY II
Phrasebooks, Grammars, Dictionaries, Readers, Supplements, et cetera
While I was in the process of updating this list of resources, I received an automated message from the platform advising me that this post had exceed the maximum of 61,000 characters. With a view to leaving space in this post for the insertion of additional courses, I transferred the lists of resources for “Phrasebooks, Grammars, Dictionaries, Readers, Supplements, Miscellaneous” et cetera, to the post below this one.

EDITED:
Completely Revised, March 2020
Last edited by Speakeasy on Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:10 pm, edited 101 times in total.
8 x

Speakeasy
Black Belt - 2nd Dan
Posts: 2532
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2015 5:19 pm
Location: Canada (Montréal region)
Languages: English (N), French (C2). Studying: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Polish, and Russian; all with widely varying degrees of application, enthusiasm, and success.
x 6583

Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Speakeasy » Tue Jan 05, 2016 6:55 pm

PART II

Indonesian Resources: CONTEMPORARY II

Phrase Books & Related Materials

50 Languages (Book2) Indonesian
English (USA) - Indonesian for beginners: A Book In 2 Languages
Book2 English - Indonesian For Beginners

BahasaKita - Indonesian Language Online Resource

Berlitz Phrase Book & Dictionary Indonesian

Casual Indonesian: Spoken Indonesian for Daily Life

DLI Indonesian Language Survival Kit
A phrasebook containing downloadable PDFs and MP3 audio files as good as most civilian phrasebooks.

Easy Indonesian: A Complete Language Course and Pocket Dictionary in One - Free Companion Online Audio

Essential Indonesian Phrasebook & Dictionary

Everyday Indonesian

Guides With Exercises To Learn Bahasa Indonesia

Hello Indonesia!

ielanguages - Indonesian Lessons

Indonesian Flash Cards: Learn the 300 most common Indonesian words with all their derived forms (Audio CD Included)

Indonesian phrase book: Bahasa Indonesia, by Paul Werny
Learn Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia): Work book, by Paul Werny

Innovative Learning Indonesian

Instant Indonesian: How to Express 1,000 Different Ideas with Just 100 Key Words and Phrases!

Learn Indonesian: Start Speaking Today. Absolute Beginner to Conversational Speaker Made Simple and Easy!

Learning Indonesian

Let's Learn Indonesian Kit: A Complete Language Learning Kit for Kids (64 Flashcards, Audio CD, Games & Songs, Learning Guide and Wall Chart)

Linguanaut Learn Indonesian

Lonely Planet Indonesian Phrasebook & Dictionary
Lonely Planet Indonesia (Travel Guide)

Mango Languages Indonesian

Omniglot Indonesian

Practical Indonesian Phrasebook: A Communication Guide

Survival Indonesian: How to Communicate Without Fuss or Fear Instantly!

Useful and Usable Indonesian 1: Bahasa Indonesia for English speaking Learners
Useful and Usable Indonesian 2: Bahasa Indonesia for English speaking learners
Useful and Usable Indonesian 3: Bahasa Indonesia for English speaking Learners
Useful and Usable Indonesian 4: Bahasa Indonesia for English speaking Learners
Indonesian for Expatriates: Learning bahasa Indonesia for foreigners

U.S. Army Special Forces 200-Hour Indonesian Familiarization Course

Welcome to Indonesian: A Beginner's Survey of the Language

Grammars & Related Materials

Indonesian: A Comprehensive Grammar (2nd ed., 2015), 438 pages, by James Sneddon et al. - Routledge

Indonesian Grammar Made Easy ( 1996, 2004), 294 pages, by Liaw Yock Fang - Marshall Cavendish Editions

Indonesian Reference Grammar (2008), 416 pages, by James Sneddon - Allen & Unwin

Indonesian Reference Grammar (2nd ed., 1976), 173 pages, R. Ross Macdonald - Georgetown University Press

Searching for Structure: The problem of complementation in colloquial Indonesian conversation (Studies in Discourse and Grammar) ( 2003), 215 pages, by Robert Englebretson - John Benjamins Publishing

Understanding Indonesian Grammar: A Student's Reference And Workbook (2008), 256 pages, by James Sneddon - Allen & Unwin

Top 100 Most Common Indonesian Verbs (2020), 59 pages, by Maria Tan

Dictionaries

A Comprehensive Indonesian-English Dictionary (2nd ed., 2010), 1128 pages, by Alan M. Stevenset al. - Ohio University Press

An Indonesian-English Dictionary (3rd ed., 1989), 624 pages, by John Echols et al. - Cornell University Press

English / Indonesian Dictionary: Kamus Bahasa Inggris (2018), 381 pages, by John C. Rigdon- Independently published

Indonésien/Français: Dictionnaire générale (1995), 934 pages, by Pierre Labrousse - Association Archipel
According to the Amazon.FR customer who expressed great satisfaction with this dictionary, a German commentator evaluated it as being the best bilingual dictionary for Indonesian in a European language.

Indonesian Pocket Dictionary (2017), 76 pages, by John Shapiro - Independently published

Javanese English Dictionary (2013), 829 pages, by Stuart Robson and Singgih Wibisono - Periplus Editions

Kamus Indonesia Inggris Dictionary (2014) by John Echols et al. - PT Gramedia Pustaka Utama

Mini Indonesian Dictionary: Indonesian-English / English-Indonesian (2018), 384 pages, by Katherine Davidsen - Tuttle Publishing

Periplus Pocket Indonesian Dictionary: Indonesian-English English-Indonesian (2nd ed., 2017), 192 pages, by Katherine Davidsen - Periplus Editions

The Learner's Dictionary of Today's Indonesian (2001), 1176 pages, by George Quinn - Allen & Unwin

Tuttle Concise Indonesian Dictionary: Indonesian-English English-Indonesian (2007), 704 pages, by A.L.N. Kramer Sr. et al. - Tuttle Publishing

Readers & Related Materials

Asian Languages Reading Level Rated Children’s Books
Pinecone wrote:I was introduced to Let's Read: Asia's Free Digital Library for Children today. It has digital children's books in the following languages … Bahasa Indonesia …[inserted: amongst numerous others]

Children’s Bilingual Readers by Maria Tan et al.
Annabell And The Five Rabbits: Annabell Dan Lima Kelincinya
The Story of Timun Mas
Golden Snail (Keong Mas)
Piruru the Nightmare Eater
Mayur the Greedy and Arrogant Peacock

BBC – Online News in Indonesian

Contemporary Indonesian Poetry: Poems in Bahasa Indonesia and English

DLI Indonesian Basic Course: The Indonesian Constitution
DLI Indonesian Basic Course: Volume XVI. Supplementary Reader
DLI Indonesian Basic Course: Volume XVII. Readings in Social and Political Problems

Episodes in Indonesian : a Pre-intermediate Proficiency Practice (2000), by Emalia Iragiliati Sukarni - Gramedia Pustaka Utama, Jakarta

Essential Indonesian Reading: A Learner's Guide 1: Revised (2008), 296 pages
Essential Indonesian Reading: A Learner's Guide 2: Revised (2005), 303 pages
This two-volume series, authored by Liaw Yock Fang und Leo Suryadinata and published by Times Editions, “… is ideal for learners who have acquired a basic knowledge of Bahasa Indonesia but wish to master its finer points. Selected and edited by well-known scholars of Indonesia, this series not only enables learners to read newspaper and books in Bahasa Indonesia but also to understand the colourful culture and lifestyle of the people of Nusantara.” Although now out-of-print, copies can still be found by diligently searching the internet (hint: AbeBooks).

FSI Indonesian Newspaper Reader (1968), 276 pages, by Joseph M Harter et al.

First Indonesian / Malay Reader for Beginners (vol. 1)

Ibu Kani's Kitchen: Dual Language English-Indonesian Cookbook

Indonesian - English Bilingual Bible / ALKITAB Terjemahan Baru - New International Version

Indonesian Writing in Translation (2009), 212 pages, by John Echols - Equinox Publishing

Intermediate Indonesian 1 - Passages and Stories for Reading, Comprhension and Precis (1975) by J Ikhsan

Kompas – Online Newspaper in Indonesian

Languages on the Web: Parallel Readers

Learn Indonesian with Beginner Stories: Interlinear Indonesian to English (2017) by Kees Van den End

Mastering Indonesian: A Guide to Reading Indonesian Language Newspapers

Modern reader in Bahasa Indonesia, Book 1 (1975) by Sarumpaet and Hendrata
Modern reader in Bahasa Indonesia, Book 2 (1975) by Sarumpaet and Hendrata

Nah, Baca! Authentic Indonesian Readings Vol. I, II (1997) by Ellen Rafferty et al. – University of Hawaii Press
Nah, Baca! Authentic Indonesian readings (vol. 1, student workbook plus reading packet)
Nah, Baca! Authentic Indonesian readings (vol. 1, teacher’s edition plus readings packet)
Nah, Baca! Authentic Indonesian readings (vol. 2, student workbook plus reading packet)
Nah, Baca! Authentic Indonesian readings (vol. 2, teacher’s edition plus readings packet)

Readings in Indonesian Culture. Pack (Book and 2 CDs) (2nd ed., 2002), 211 pages, by Malcolm W. Mintz - Indonesian / Malay Texts and Resources
Readings cover different geographical areas of Indonesia and discuss various ethnic groups. Reading selections are recorded on two audio CD's which accompany the book. Although no longer available via the websites of major online booksellers, it is possible that the publisher might still have copies. NOTE: a previous edition is available.

Vocabulary Building in Indonesian: An Advanced Reader (1984), 664 pages, by Soenjono Dardjowidjojo- Ohio University Press

Wikipedia in Indonesian - Selamat datang di Wikipedia

Supplemental Practice

Bahasa Inggris until Studi Di Australia - Radio Australia
As this is actually an English course for Indonesians, I have listed it (avec remerciements à Adrianslont) amongst the supplemental practice materials.
Adrianslont wrote:… Bahasa Inggris until Studi Di Australia: BIUSDA as I like to abbreviate it is actually an English language course for Indonesians planning to study at university, language college or technical college in Australia. It was broadcast on Radio Australia and is available for download online. Although students of Indonesian are not the intended audience, I have got fantastic use out of it using it to learn Indonesian at an intermediate level. There are 26 episodes, each 20 minutes long. There are a bunch of characters that are featured throughout in a kind of narrative as they come to Australia, study and do stuff. Each episode has bilingual dialogues, advice for the intending overseas student in Indonesian, an interview with a student about their experiences in Australia and a little pronunciation. Each episode is about 80 per cent Indonesian and the English really doesn't get in the way. Fantastic and free!


BBC Radio Player in Indonesian

Digital Dialects - Bahasa Indonesia language - Online Study Games

DLI GLOSS Indonesian Files – U.S. Defense Language Institute
The DLI GLOSS website currently hosts 274 (downloadable) exercise sets for the practice of Indonesian. Access is free.

NFLC Indonesian Files - University of Maryland
The NFLC (National Foreign Language Center) website presently hosts 20 (downloadable) exercise sets for the practice of Indonesian. Access is subject to payment of a monthly subscription fee of $5.00 which can be cancelled at any time.

Indonesian Tongue Twisters with English Translations, by Marie Tan

Top 100 Indonesian Idioms, by Maria Tan

Nickelodeon Bahasa - YouTube

Titan Tira - YouTube
Axon wrote:I have a resource here that might be useful to those of us struggling with fast informal Indonesian: Titan Tyra. She's a vlogger from (I believe) Jakarta who produces a lot of content on different subjects and travels to a lot of places. Most excitingly, she's started putting dual subtitles on her videos!

Watch out for her code-switching, though. Like many Indonesians, she speaks English very well and mixes the two languages frequently. Here's one subtitle: Dan aku gugup banget karena aku pikir tuh aku bisa keren gitu lho di akhir video

She actually says: Dan aku nervous banget karena aku pikir tuh aku bisa keren gitu lho di at the end of this video

Indonesian Resources: MISCELLANEOUS

Airsip Semarang

Colloquial Jakartan Indonesian (2006), by James Sneddon - Pacific Linguistics

Indonesian Internet Slang Words and Acronyms (Colloquial Indonesian Book 1) by Maria Tan

SEAsite - Indonesian Learning Language Website - Northern Illinois University

The Indonesian Language: Its History and Role in Modern Society (2003), 248 pages, by James Sneddon - University of New South Wales Press

The Makings of Indonesian Islam (2013), 326 pages, by Michael Laffan - Princeton University Press

List of resources copied from the Bahasa Indonesia untuk Dunia study group.
Axon wrote:Resources:

Citybooks (Thanks, Iguanamon!) narrated short stories:
Jakarta
Semarang

Easy Indonesian street interviews playlist

Easy Malay street interviews playlist

Doraemon episodes dubbed into Indonesian with soft subs

EpicVice - light listicle content with accurate hard subs

Watchdoc Documentaries - short documentaries. Some have accurate hard subs, sometimes the subtitles don't quite match

SBS Your Language- Australian radio programs, downloadable, no transcripts

LINE Kamus Inggris - The best available Indonesian-English dictionary, available only as an app.

More to come...


EDITED:
Completely Revised, March 2020
Last edited by Speakeasy on Tue Mar 17, 2020 11:18 pm, edited 10 times in total.
0 x

Daristani
Orange Belt
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2015 3:43 pm
x 362

Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Daristani » Thu Jan 07, 2016 9:33 pm

I'm commenting a bit late on this thread because I've been searching my computer files in vain for the old DLI Indonesian Basic Course, which I was pretty sure I had but haven't been able to find.

Back in 2009, Fat-Tony, a member on the "old" HTLAL forum, uploaded a lot of DLI language courses, including Indonesian, for members to download; per my recollection, the Indonesian course was a single and rather lengthy course, rather than the assortment of disparate materials for Indonesian now available on the DLI site (https://jlu.wbtrain.com/sumtotal/langua ... an%20SOLT/).

I recall having sent this course to another forum member after Fat-Tony's links had expired. Unfortunately, I can't find it anywhere in my current files, and assume that it somehow went astray in computer crashes, migrating from one computer to another, etc., over the last few years.

I don't know whether or not Fat-Tony is still around very much on this or the older forum, or whether anyone else might have downloaded the Indonesian course at the time, but it may well be that someone on the forum has a copy of these materials that could be made available.

Also, looking at the description of the Indonesian course offered on EBay that Speakeasy found, I suspect that this may well be the original DLI Basic Course. The seller provides no useful information on the origins of the course, but given the brief description buried in all the verbiage ("1578 pages in PDF format and over 29 hours of MP3 audio"), it looks like it might well be a DLI course. In any event, the price is very cheap for that much PDF/MP3 material, even if the seller is profiting from material that might otherwise be in the public domain.
2 x

Online
User avatar
Adrianslont
Blue Belt
Posts: 717
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2015 10:39 am
Location: Australia
Languages: English (N), Learning Indonesian and French
x 1440

Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Adrianslont » Fri Jan 08, 2016 3:58 am

I can add a little to this, based on my own Indonesian studies.

Linguaphone
It's from the seventies as there are references to hippies!

There are forty lessons and I used it as my first course, though I was a false beginner. Pretty good first course; there's a story thread over the forty units and the storyline and characters are interesting enough. I think it's well graded and the topics and language are good if a little formal.
Each unit has a conversation of two or three minutes and some audio-lingual exercises. I don't really like drills so edited them out and just used the conversations. I did my own thing with them, listening to them repeatedly in the car, and also reading the pretty good language and cultural notes that come in the book at home. I sometimes did transcribing and sometimes made Anki cards with audio.
After thirty units I got a bit bored with it and just listened to the last ten units in the car.
It served me well but sometimes the voice acting is pretty stilted. Other times it's fine.

Assimil
I haven't been as a methodical with Assimil, mainly because I found something else I prefer.
I did work through about the first twenty units, listening, listening and reading, reading the language and cultural notes. I've listened to later units for practice in the car. I think I will return to it at some point because I think it has something to offer. The language is a little more colloquial than Linguaphone and they even throw in some Javanese.
How did I find it? Well, I managed to use it quite readily despite having what is probably only A2 French. I guess I had some Indonesian by then, though. Some lessons were better than others. Some seemed a little forced in order to cover some language point, others quite natural and occasionally humorous. I liked the voice actors and they sounded more everyday than the Linguaphone actors to me. 100 lessons.

Bahasa Inggris until Studi Di Australia

BIUSDA as I like to abbreviate it is actually an English language course for Indonesians planning to study at university, language college or technical college in Australia. It was broadcast on Radio Australia and is available for download online. Although students of Indonesian are not the intended audience, I have got fantastic use out of it using it to learn Indonesian at an intermediate level.
There are 26 episodes, each 20 minutes long. There are a bunch of characters that are featured throughout in a kind of narrative as they come to Australia, study and do stuff. Each episode has bilingual dialogues, advice for the intending overseas student in Indonesian, an interview with a student about their experiences in Australia and a little pronunciation. Each episode is about 80 per cent Indonesian and the English really doesn't get in the way. Fantastic and free!

http://m.radioaustralia.net.au/indonesi ... -australia

The Indonesian Way
I've had a quick look at this course from the University of Hawaii and it looks pretty good. You seem to be able to do it online or download print, audio and premade Anki decks. And all free. If I hadn't started linguaphone I probably would have done this. Looks like quality and it's totally free!

I hope there is someone on the forum who finds that all helpful!
4 x

Online
User avatar
Adrianslont
Blue Belt
Posts: 717
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2015 10:39 am
Location: Australia
Languages: English (N), Learning Indonesian and French
x 1440

Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Adrianslont » Fri Jan 08, 2016 12:22 pm

I forgot to say that Bahasa Inggris untuk Studi di Australia has the bonus of transcripts. This is gold for students of Indonesian as it's basically native speaker podcast material with transcripts and I don't know of any other Indonesian podcast that has them. I only know of news podcasts from SBS in Australia, the Japanese outfit that does various languages and there is an American origin podcast, too. None of them have transcripts. And Indonesia doesn't seem to produce podcasts. If I'm mistaken about that, please put me straight!
1 x

Speakeasy
Black Belt - 2nd Dan
Posts: 2532
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2015 5:19 pm
Location: Canada (Montréal region)
Languages: English (N), French (C2). Studying: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Polish, and Russian; all with widely varying degrees of application, enthusiasm, and success.
x 6583

Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Speakeasy » Fri Jan 22, 2016 10:46 pm

Unpaid Labour ... Yours Perhaps?

A couple of weeks ago, I noticed that there had been increased “chatter” on the language forum concerning audio-lingual courses for a number of languages, including Indonesian. Although I have not studied Indonesian myself and have no particular plans to do so, I decided to open the discussion thread “Indonesian Resources” above.

During my search for materials and links under this topic, I came across the Indonesian audio recordings that are freely available on the Indiana University CeLt Recorded Archives website: http://www.iu.edu/~celtie/indonesian_archive.html. In my communications with the CeLt staff, they advised me that they had an index card record of the origin of these recordings but that they did not have the corresponding textbook. I consulted the Librarian of the Indiana University’s Southeast Asian faculty and they, too, did not have a copy of the textbook, nor apparently do any of the faculty. Between them, they surmised that this was a project that was never completed, possibly for lack of funding. I find this somewhat of a shame as, upon a quick review of the recordings themselves, it becomes abundantly clear that the audio-lingual method was employed. It occurred to me that an opportunity exists to restore a portion of the original textbook through the preparation of a transcript of the Indonesian audio files accompanied by an English translation. Obviously, only someone who possess both languages could prepare such a document … and my thoughts turned to all of you … well, okay, to some of you!

Would anyone be interested in “volunteering” for such a project? I appreciate that it would represent an investment of personal time and we all experience multiple demands on this precious resource. My hope is to find someone who would take on this task and that the resulting document would be offered to the Indiana University for hosting on their website to accompany the audio recordings. So, who’s “all in” on this project? Thank you for your consideration.
2 x

Daristani
Orange Belt
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2015 3:43 pm
x 362

Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Daristani » Sun Dec 24, 2017 4:49 pm

I apologize for reviving such an old thread, but since the heading is "Indonesian resources", I thought this would be a good place to add a couple of items in case they might be useful to people seeking just such resources:

The DLI Basic Indonesian Course cited above has been found and made available online for free and legal download. I noted this in an entry on another thread https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 626#p89626 and now forum stalwart Expugnator has sent the materials to the Yojik site, where they can be downloaded:

https://fsi-languages.yojik.eu/language ... esian.html

To reiterate, this is the Indonesian Basic Course, which is NOT available on the DLI courses website at https://jlu.wbtrain.com/sumtotal/langua ... 20courses/

Regarding other public-domain materials, it's evident that the Foreign Service Institute produced an Indonesian Newspaper Reader; this can be downloaded at https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED024932.pdf

It seems that FSI produced a two-volume, 60-unit "Indonesian Basic Course" as well in 1959. I see little mention of this on-line, but my local university library seems to have a copy of it in an auxiliary library facility (evidently used for books that don't circulate very often). I'm hoping to get this after Christmas, and if so, will try to scan it for eventual posting on-line, on the assumption that it's in the public domain just like the other FSI courses.

As rare as the books seem to be, the audio is probably even rarer, but I have a sneaking suspicion that the audio Speakeasy found on the Indiana University CeLT website just MIGHT be associated with the FSI course. (The audio-lingual format at least sounds similar, although it appears that the CeLT materials don't extend to the full 60 units of the books.) Whether or not my surmise is valid will only become clear if and when I can get my hands on the books.

In the meantime, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to one and all.
3 x

Daristani
Orange Belt
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2015 3:43 pm
x 362

Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Daristani » Fri Jan 05, 2018 9:21 pm

Further to my above message, I regret to advise that my local university library only has volume two of the FSI "Indonesian Basic Course"; volume one has evidently been missing for quite some time. Accordingly, I can't determine whether the audio on the Indiana University CeLT site goes with this course, and I won't be scanning the book, as volume two without either volume one or the audio seems relatively useless.

Should anyone else be interested in tracking down the books in question, the only other libraries listed as having copies are Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah; the Fuller Theological Seminary Library in Pasadena, California; and the International Islamic University in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, so they don't seem to have been very broadly distributed. The audio is presumably at least as rare.
1 x

Speakeasy
Black Belt - 2nd Dan
Posts: 2532
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2015 5:19 pm
Location: Canada (Montréal region)
Languages: English (N), French (C2). Studying: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Polish, and Russian; all with widely varying degrees of application, enthusiasm, and success.
x 6583

Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Speakeasy » Sat Jan 06, 2018 12:22 am

FSI Indonesian Basic Course

Daristani, thank you very much for your efforts in tracking down the FSI Indonesian Basic Course.

Daristani wrote: ... It seems that FSI produced a two-volume, 60-unit "Indonesian Basic Course" as well in 1959. I see little mention of this on-line, but my local university library seems to have a copy of it in an auxiliary library facility (evidently used for books that don't circulate very often). I'm hoping to get this after Christmas, and if so, will try to scan it for eventual posting on-line, on the assumption that it's in the public domain just like the other FSI courses.

As rare as the books seem to be, the audio is probably even rarer, but I have a sneaking suspicion that the audio Speakeasy found on the Indiana University CeLT website just MIGHT be associated with the FSI course. (The audio-lingual format at least sounds similar, although it appears that the CeLT materials don't extend to the full 60 units of the books.) Whether or not my surmise is valid will only become clear if and when I can get my hands on the books ...


Daristani wrote:Further to my above message, I regret to advise that my local university library only has volume two of the FSI "Indonesian Basic Course"; volume one has evidently been missing for quite some time. Accordingly, I can't determine whether the audio on the Indiana University CeLT site goes with this course, and I won't be scanning the book, as volume two without either volume one or the audio seems relatively useless.

Should anyone else be interested in tracking down the books in question, the only other libraries listed as having copies are Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah; the Fuller Theological Seminary Library in Pasadena, California; and the International Islamic University in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, so they don't seem to have been very broadly distributed. The audio is presumably at least as rare.


Indian University CeLT website (Indonesian Resources)
In January 2016, I submitted a request to the Indian University CeLT for information regarding the source of the "Indonesian Basic Course (Bahasa Dialect)" audio files that are available on their website (publisher, author, verification of title, copyright status, et cetera) to which the Language Materials Coordinator replied: “Our old card catalog lists those materials simply as “Intensive Indonesian Program” by Harsono & Baird, 1965. I hope this little bit of information is helpful.” My searches of the internet have not revealed any information on this title.

The CeLT sound files themselves do not seem to identify the title of the course. Rather, they simply begin, in English, as; “Basic sentences, Unit 1” et cetera. There are 15 units in the CeLT collection. These audio files may very well turn out to be those of the FSI Indonesian Basic Course; however, in the absence of the corresponding course manuals and the lack of a transcription, they remain a mystery and of little practical use to would be learners of the language.

EDITED:
Typos.
0 x

abejo
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2019 6:55 pm
Languages: Indonesian, English
x 3

Re: Indonesian resources

Postby abejo » Sat Feb 02, 2019 7:23 pm

Hello, everyone

I have been trying to teach Indonesian to some adult learners. After trying some books and audio materials, I found that DLI SOLT I Indonesian a superb resource to help English-speaking learners to learn Bahasa Indonesian. I simply add some introduction to how the language works as far as its word formations, basic sentence patterns and surely its pronunciation. Unfortunately, one pdf file is missing/corrupted from DLI SOLT - that is the manual for module 4 lesson 6. I have tried yojik, livelingua, jlu.wbtrain.com, yumpu.com, and even bought some CD/DVD off ebay without success. I wonder if anybody out there know the right place to find the missing file.

Many thanks in advance.
3 x


Return to “Language Programs and Resources”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Teango and 1 guest