Spanish against French: the fight to be the second global language

This is a room for the discussion of travel plans or experiences and the culture of places you have visited or plan to visit.
yong321
Orange Belt
Posts: 104
Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2016 12:42 am
Location: Texas
Languages: English, Chinese. Spanish, French, Italian, German, reading comprehension only.
Language Log: http://yong321.freeshell.org/misc.html#Linguistics
x 103
Contact:

Spanish against French: the fight to be the second global language

Postby yong321 » Thu Apr 26, 2018 7:40 pm

I find this article pretty interesting:
http://www.elmundo.es/papel/cultura/201 ... b45a2.html
Español contra francés: la lucha por ser el segundo idioma global
(Spanish against French: the fight to be the second global language)

The following is a translation of part of the article:

"The great asset of French to remain as an international language is Africa . Africa is the only continent where the population will continue to grow in the 21st century... Anyone who has spent three days in Dakar will have realized that in sub-Saharan Africa, French is a language that is read, that is on the posters and on the restaurant menus, but it's barely heard on the street... among them [the African natives] they speak African languages.

"[According to Duolingo] in how many countries in the world is the Spanish course the most demanded? In 32. And the French? In 36. And in how many countries does Spanish appear in the second position? In 57. French is in 77. However, the interesting thing is to locate those countries on the map. [The article has maps and graphs. Please refer to them.] Then, it is found that French is strong in Africa and in other territories where it's already official, such as Canada, as well as Russia, India and the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America. In contrast, Spanish has its demand in Japan, China, Brazil, Europe and in English-speaking countries, including the United States . Less territories but richer and more influential."

And a reader's comment below the article:

"I work in a British university in China. It's the second Chinese British university where I work. In both cases, Spanish won among various foreign language​s (apart from English, of course). This success has been achieved in spite of lack of promotion policies etc. In fact, soft power and popular culture are much more important. They have slowly done more to promote the Spanish language than any institutional campaign."
5 x

Cavesa
Black Belt - 3rd Dan
Posts: 3411
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2015 9:46 am
Languages: Czech (N), English (C1), French (C2), Spanish (intermediate), German (somewhere on the path), Italian (passive advanced, active basic)
x 9949

Re: Spanish against French: the fight to be the second global language

Postby Cavesa » Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:54 pm

Spanish is gonna win this fight.

The power of popular culture and being "cool" is huge. Spanish is getting more and more popular even in the Czech Republic and similar countries, where it "rationally" makes no sense for it to slowly overtake French. It is not overtaking it in public schools yet, it takes longer there. But the private language schools are already getting to that point.

Truth be told, the French language teaching and culture presenting industry is to blame partially. We've seen a huge rise in the amount and quality of the Spanish teaching materials, while French has been more or less stagnating. A visit to any large and well stocked bookstore shows it well (based on my observation in bookshops in the Czech Republic, Germany, France, and Spain so far). It can be seen on various examples, like Spanish having several mainstream C1 coursebooks, while French has still got only the Alter Ego. Compare the prices of immersion courses in the countries in comparable cities, the French ones are more expensive not only than the Spanish ones. But also more expensive than the German ones and often the English ones.

The French are less supportive towards learners and it is not just switching on people in France. It is an attitude represented everywhere. "French is the most difficult language", "French is the language of arts", and so on. It often feels snobbish. Spanish is being more and more connected to the ideas of having fun and learning easily. And the natives don't switch on people that much.

Learning French is simply more complicated even if we don't start comparing the languages themselves. People usually don't need it that much, they are already learning English. So, why choose tons of obstacles as their second language?

The way France represents itself is in many ways wonderful, at least as long as you look at the export for the "intelectual elite". But they don't bother sharing their great popular culture much. France forgets that the normal people are bored with the Eiffel Tower, baguettes, awesome cuisine (have you noticed how many people will tell you it is great but won't name a single typical meal?), and the romantic photos of Paris. It forgets noone wants to watch Fantomas or Belmondo movies anymore and Celine Dion isn't gonna appeal to the young people. There are tons of tv series and musicians and all the stuff that matters in France nowadays. But they fail to promote it abroad. Somehow, the Latin America and Spain are much more successful in this field. Spanish feels fresh.

This is happening in Europe. And Europe matters. It is rich.

Africa? Sure, the numbers are there. The economical power? not so much. The number of natives? High. The number of monolingual natives? I don't think there will be that many. Plus there is a constant pressure for the original languages to take a more prestigious place in various countries, as the article mentions too.

What the article doesn't mention much are some obviously powerful languages in Africa, such as Arabic. It is rather common not only in the north. English can still strenghten the position. And as China is investing a lot in the eastern african countries, from what I've read, it might become a popular foreign language there.

The position of French is not as strong as it looks. Not even in the north african countries. If some of the countries start patriotically pushing Arabic and/or other languages more strongly into their schools and universities, French is lost. My source, apart from various online reading: my classmates from several african countries in France.

Asia. What major reason for either French or Spanish do they have, apart from coolness and fun? They speak one or more languages already, multilingualism is rather common, they are learning English, and they have several economically and culturally valuable alternatives much closer to their homes. Wikipedia says that the second most commonly studied language in China is Japanese. I don't think the match between Spanish and French is even being really played on this field.

French can still turn this around. With massive support of this project. But I don't think it will.
13 x

yong321
Orange Belt
Posts: 104
Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2016 12:42 am
Location: Texas
Languages: English, Chinese. Spanish, French, Italian, German, reading comprehension only.
Language Log: http://yong321.freeshell.org/misc.html#Linguistics
x 103
Contact:

Re: Spanish against French: the fight to be the second global language

Postby yong321 » Fri Apr 27, 2018 3:00 am

Cavesa's message is quite convincing! My comments are as follows.

> We've seen a huge rise in the amount and quality of the Spanish teaching materials, while French has been more or less stagnating. A visit to any large and well stocked bookstore shows it well (based on my observation in bookshops in the Czech Republic, Germany, France, and Spain so far).

Thanks for making an observation in bookstores in four different countries. My observation, in fact, bookshelf counting, in the US is in
http://english-for-chinese.blogspot.com ... visit.html
Spanish books occupy more than twice the number of shelves than French books.

> The French are less supportive towards learners and it is not just switching on people in France. It is an attitude represented everywhere. .... It often feels snobbish.

It is a stereotype but has some truth in it: the French-speaking people may be less tolerant of or friendly to any one not speaking their language while in France or even Quebec than, say, the Spaniards to one not speaking Spanish in Spain. President Macron's "gran plan nacional dedicado a relanzar el idioma como lengua global" probably does not contain a passage suggesting this attitude be changed. (Personally though, I still like to study French, just for fun if nothing else.)

> Wikipedia says that the second most commonly studied language in China is Japanese. I don't think the match between Spanish and French is even being really played on this field.

I found that statement about Japanese in China at
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages ... _languages
But it's not giving any reference. It's an interesting fact nonetheless. I want to add that nowadays public safety in France is a big concern. It negatively affects French learners that intend to go to France to study. Among these learners, female students are overwhelmingly in the majority. No doubt personal safety in some Latin American countries is even worse. But Spanish learners, whose gender ratio may be more balanced, do not really have a clear destination to study the language as in case of French when they plan to study abroad.
2 x

Online
garyb
Brown Belt
Posts: 1177
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2015 12:35 pm
Location: Scotland
Languages: Native: English
Advanced: Italian, French
Intermediate: Spanish
Beginner: Greek
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1855
x 3477
Contact:

Re: Spanish against French: the fight to be the second global language

Postby garyb » Fri Apr 27, 2018 10:19 am

I usually avoid these kinds of topics, but Cavesa's post is great and as soon as I read the subject line I also thought that it's surely a fight that French cannot win. I thought that Africa was its only chance, but between the article and Cavesa's reply it seems that even that might not be a strong case.

It's a bit of a stereotype but in Europe, and even more so in the USA, it seems like people mostly study French for pleasure (often based on a romanticised and outdated image of France and its culture) and Spanish for utility. Here in the UK, French has traditionally been the main foreign language taught in schools along with German, making it the "go-to" choice for adults who want to learn a language but weren't sure which: picking up one you already have some basics in, even if you barely remember them, is less daunting than starting from scratch. But even that might be changing now.

It's also true that the French are learning English more and more, even if they still have a lot of catching up to do compared to some other countries. I remember that I went to a big music festival in France as a beginner, and it really tested the limits of my A2-level French since I was the only person in my group who could communicate at all with many of the people we met. Yet a few years later I returned there with a much more conversational level but found that I hardly needed it. I did also encounter quite a bit of English when travelling around Spain last year, but my impression was that at least outside touristy areas Spanish is still useful and will continue to be so for a good while. I can't speak for Latin America but very broadly based on what I've heard it seems similar.
3 x

User avatar
reineke
Black Belt - 3rd Dan
Posts: 3434
Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2016 7:34 pm
Languages: Fox (C4)
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... =15&t=6979
x 6089
Contact:

Re: Spanish against French: the fight to be the second global language

Postby reineke » Fri Apr 27, 2018 3:41 pm

Spanish vs French

They both lose.

Introduzione alla didattica dell’Intercomprensione

“A Europe of polyglots is not a Europe of people who speak many languages fluently, but, in the best case scenario, of people who can communicate, each speaking his own language and understanding that of the other, but who, while not being able to speak it fluently, by understanding it, even with difficulty, would understand the “spirit”, the cultural universe that every one expresses when speaking the language of his ancestors and of his own tradition.”

Umberto Eco, In Search of the Perfect Language (Building Europe). Oxford: Blackwell, 1995.

"Molti (più pericolosi per le lingue romanze di quanto non lo siano l’inglese e gli anglisti) si consolavano con i dati (“lo spagnolo è più diffuso dell’inglese”, “il portoghese ha più parlanti del francese”, “l’italiano è in forte ripresa ovunque”): dati veri, ma decontestualizzati.

Se gli ispanofoni sono più degli anglofoni, ma devono parlare in inglese per commerciare nel mondo, il dato iniziale, vero in sé, è reso falso da un altro dato, cioè la vittoria dell’angloamericano (non dell’inglese britannico, sconfitto come tutte le lingue europee) nella battaglia mondiale delle lingue nel ventesimo secolo.

Le glorie passate sono importanti ma nel mondo darwiniano non sono determinanti; gli splendori della cultura danno prestigio e aggiungono attrazione, ma non danno forza..."

https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... ese#p50329

Mutual Understanding
https://www.languagemagazine.com/mutual-understanding/
4 x

Cavesa
Black Belt - 3rd Dan
Posts: 3411
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2015 9:46 am
Languages: Czech (N), English (C1), French (C2), Spanish (intermediate), German (somewhere on the path), Italian (passive advanced, active basic)
x 9949

Re: Spanish against French: the fight to be the second global language

Postby Cavesa » Sun Apr 29, 2018 10:37 pm

yong321 wrote:
> The French are less supportive towards learners and it is not just switching on people in France. It is an attitude represented everywhere. .... It often feels snobbish.

It is a stereotype but has some truth in it: the French-speaking people may be less tolerant of or friendly to any one not speaking their language while in France or even Quebec than, say, the Spaniards to one not speaking Spanish in Spain. President Macron's "gran plan nacional dedicado a relanzar el idioma como lengua global" probably does not contain a passage suggesting this attitude be changed. (Personally though, I still like to study French, just for fun if nothing else.)


That stereotype is no longer true. The Spanish natives are much more welcoming to people speaking various level of Spanish. The French natives are definitely not less tolerant to people not speaking their language. Quite the opposite. They expect people to suck at French, so they prefer to switch even when the foreigner's French is several levels above their English. This stereotype is not true anymore. It is the opposite. It is actually hard to practice French in France even at the higher levels, especially if you have some things against you (for example having a clearly foreign family with you).

A stereotype I have observed to be true is not just the switching (which is a rather common expericence, if you listen to people who have actually tried it out instead of just parroting what generations before them used to experience) but also when it comes to attitudes of teachers (native and non native), coursebooks (not only prefaces with weirdly discouraging passages but also the curriculum they choose, I really think the French ones are not far from creating a self fulfilling prophecy of everything being hard and people unlikely to succeed), the general natives's opinions on learners (this is not just switching, but the honest surprise anyone could actually talk better than a neanderthal expressed directly or indirectly), the attitudes of the French eshops with books and similar stuff (Just a few years ago, the amazon.fr was offering much worse delivery conditions than amazon.de or amazon.es or amazon.it, it is a bit more equal now), and it goes on.

The Spanish natives are not making such a big deal of it. They switch less, but of course it can happen (especially if you are not too advanced). The teachers and coursebooks look at the learner with more optimism, and the amount of astonishment a competent learner provokes is much more reasonable.


> Wikipedia says that the second most commonly studied language in China is Japanese. I don't think the match between Spanish and French is even being really played on this field.

I found that statement about Japanese in China at
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages ... _languages
But it's not giving any reference. It's an interesting fact nonetheless. I want to add that nowadays public safety in France is a big concern. It negatively affects French learners that intend to go to France to study. Among these learners, female students are overwhelmingly in the majority. No doubt personal safety in some Latin American countries is even worse. But Spanish learners, whose gender ratio may be more balanced, do not really have a clear destination to study the language as in case of French when they plan to study abroad.

Public safety? Excuse me but I disagree, based on experience. There are places you won't like in any country. But in general, vast majority of Europe is very safe. And from all I have heard from people either travelling to the south american countries or from their natives in Europe, these two still cannot be compared much, even though the situation in the SA seems to be improving over time, with regional and national variability. And you might also notice an extremely horrible case being discussed in Spain these days and the theme of women's safety being very much alive.

I am a young woman (ok, not that young anymore, but still under 30). Yes, I am sometimes afraid, I am a potential target of violence. But I realise extremely well that I live in the safest region of the world, which is Europe, except for smaller islands of trouble (which tend to not be that safe for men either). I don't find much difference in my safety and well being as a woman in the Czech Republic, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Hungary, or Austria.

This is definitely a valid concern in general, it is one of the reasons why I would definitely hesitate about Arabic, the african languages used in generally unsafe regions, and perhaps some others. Don't get me wrong, but I find this rather laughable, when talking about Europe in this context. In many aspects, Europe is also much safer than the US by the way.

From my observation, the women/men ration among Spanish and French learners is similar. Mostly women. My guesses why: men tend to "make the rational choice" and are likely to go for something else unless forced to sign up for a particular language other than English. In Europe, it can be German or Russian, or sometimes even the asian languages, or a totally different skill than a second or third foreign language. But you are probably right that French is even more "not manly enough" than Spanish. But it is just a marketing fault in my opinion.

And we are back at the original point: the marketing of the countries and languages. Both the French and Spanish speaking countries have tons of stuff traditionally considered interesting for men. Science, industry, and so on. But France is presenting itself far too little and too much in English, from my observation. Sure, I am oriented mostly on medicine, but I am interested in other areas too. And I find it fascinating, how underestimated the country is. For example, people completely underestimate the amount and importance of the French companies in the Czech Republic. And both the French library and the Spanish one here in Prague and vastly more focused on humanities than on science. It's a ton of little things like this, which makes certain kinds of public not appreciate the language enough. And when it comes to switching the science to English, I am afraid French is much more endangered than Spanish. It is not just about the articles, it is also about the languages really spoken by the people.

It's like "hey, want to learn German, the language of BMW, or Spanish, the language of one of the continents with oil? Or you can learn French, the language of art." :-D

garyb wrote:I usually avoid these kinds of topics, but Cavesa's post is great and as soon as I read the subject line I also thought that it's surely a fight that French cannot win. I thought that Africa was its only chance, but between the article and Cavesa's reply it seems that even that might not be a strong case.

It's a bit of a stereotype but in Europe, and even more so in the USA, it seems like people mostly study French for pleasure (often based on a romanticised and outdated image of France and its culture) and Spanish for utility. Here in the UK, French has traditionally been the main foreign language taught in schools along with German, making it the "go-to" choice for adults who want to learn a language but weren't sure which: picking up one you already have some basics in, even if you barely remember them, is less daunting than starting from scratch. But even that might be changing now.

It's also true that the French are learning English more and more, even if they still have a lot of catching up to do compared to some other countries. I remember that I went to a big music festival in France as a beginner, and it really tested the limits of my A2-level French since I was the only person in my group who could communicate at all with many of the people we met. Yet a few years later I returned there with a much more conversational level but found that I hardly needed it. I did also encounter quite a bit of English when travelling around Spain last year, but my impression was that at least outside touristy areas Spanish is still useful and will continue to be so for a good while. I can't speak for Latin America but very broadly based on what I've heard it seems similar.


Thanks :-)

I think Spanish for utility is mostly an american thing. In Europe, it has always been French vs. Germany and it seems like there is little difference between the UK and Central Europe. But that has a few consequences. A part of the interest in Spanish within the US has consequences outside of it. For example more resources for anglophone learners. But I think a larger part of the growth in Europe is the "coolness". Even if it was just the fact that Spain is a very popular destination for tourists, and the Spanish songs getting abroad more often than the French ones, it would already be a constant tiny influence on people.

The French are catching up already. The young ones are. And all the generations assume that their English must be better than the foreigner's French, from my experience, for reasons we have discussed many times. But the young French natives are overall not that bad at English. I would personally say they are on average better than young Spanish or Czech natives.

I agree about the situation in Spain, and I have less experience than you so I wouldn't doubt you. The language will remain very useful for a long time. An example: I was really susprised by the non-existent English among the Spanish medicine students I was staying with during my student exchange years ago. Young people studying at university are usually the best English speakers of any country. And let's not forget that getting to medicine in Spain depends on the grades from highschool. As far as I know, all the subjects and all the years. So, these people couldn't have been less than above average in any obligatory subject including English. So, Spanish is far from being lost :-)

In France, many universities are even teaching the native French students in English :-( Such programs are becoming very popular, especially in the fields of business and marketing, and I find it disturbing. I read an interesting lemonde article some time ago, which was finding it disturbing too. Not only because of the rise of English in the country. But also due to the quality of teaching. Simply put: non native teachers plus non native students, that rarely leads to hyper awesome education in the non native language.

reineke wrote:Spanish vs French

They both lose.

Introduzione alla didattica dell’Intercomprensione

“A Europe of polyglots is not a Europe of people who speak many languages fluently, but, in the best case scenario, of people who can communicate, each speaking his own language and understanding that of the other, but who, while not being able to speak it fluently, by understanding it, even with difficulty, would understand the “spirit”, the cultural universe that every one expresses when speaking the language of his ancestors and of his own tradition.”

Umberto Eco, In Search of the Perfect Language (Building Europe). Oxford: Blackwell, 1995.

"Molti (più pericolosi per le lingue romanze di quanto non lo siano l’inglese e gli anglisti) si consolavano con i dati (“lo spagnolo è più diffuso dell’inglese”, “il portoghese ha più parlanti del francese”, “l’italiano è in forte ripresa ovunque”): dati veri, ma decontestualizzati.

Se gli ispanofoni sono più degli anglofoni, ma devono parlare in inglese per commerciare nel mondo, il dato iniziale, vero in sé, è reso falso da un altro dato, cioè la vittoria dell’angloamericano (non dell’inglese britannico, sconfitto come tutte le lingue europee) nella battaglia mondiale delle lingue nel ventesimo secolo.

Le glorie passate sono importanti ma nel mondo darwiniano non sono determinanti; gli splendori della cultura danno prestigio e aggiungono attrazione, ma non danno forza..."

https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... ese#p50329

Mutual Understanding
https://www.languagemagazine.com/mutual-understanding/


That is an interesting theory. But any ideas about the languages of Europe worded in 1995 are far from reality now. In 1995, there was no widely spread internet(=English). In the 90's, there were far fewer migrants of both european and non european origin and therefore the situation was much more like 1 country=1 language=1 tradition and 2 languages=a dialogue between people from 2 countries. In the 90's, the EU was definitely not what it is now, the general mobility was not that high and I dare say it was not that huge even in the old EU countries.

Back then, you were expected to stay put among people like you and occasionally communicate with a foreigner and somehow get a message across, and enjoy some understanding based on having the same ancestors and tradition with roots a few thousand years ago. Nowadays, it is normal for us to have foreigners around us and/or become a foreigner around someone else in their place of origin. That is totally different.
1 x

User avatar
reineke
Black Belt - 3rd Dan
Posts: 3434
Joined: Wed Jan 06, 2016 7:34 pm
Languages: Fox (C4)
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... =15&t=6979
x 6089
Contact:

Re: Spanish against French: the fight to be the second global language

Postby reineke » Mon Apr 30, 2018 2:02 pm

1990s - the dark ages...

I could agree with that but I don't remember the 1990s as you describe them. I do remember a Croatian soldier discharging a Kalashnikov in combat while being interviewed on Spanish television. He wanted to switch to French but the Spanish reporter ignored his "Parlez-vous français?". The former Eastern Bloc certainly had to work hard to catch up (in both ethnic conflict and polyglottery).The Erasmus Program was established in 1987 and The Maastricht Treaty was signed in 1992. Increased mobility is not necessarily a fertile ground for polyglottery. Thanks to modern communications English is spreading in depth and breadth. In the current context, who wins the second fiddle contest is largely irrelevant.
4 x

SmartRat
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon May 21, 2018 6:45 pm
Languages: Englisn (N) Norwegian (beginner), French (beginner)
x 1

Re: Spanish against French: the fight to be the second global language

Postby SmartRat » Tue May 22, 2018 12:24 pm

Interesting, I would be happy if French wins, as I speak the language, but more likely it will be Spanish...
0 x

User avatar
aokoye
Black Belt - 1st Dan
Posts: 1703
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 6:14 pm
Location: Portland, OR
Languages: English (N), German (~C1), French (Intermediate), Swedish (beginner), Dutch (A2)
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 15&t=10151
x 2882
Contact:

Re: Spanish against French: the fight to be the second global language

Postby aokoye » Tue May 22, 2018 3:33 pm

I don't think it's about which language is cool so much as which language, among these two, has the most economic and potentially geopolitical power. It's also not as if we're talking about a set of languages where one is arguably significantly more difficult to learn for large swaths of people than the other. If that were the case my thoughts would be a bit different.
0 x
Prefered gender pronouns: Masculine

Cavesa
Black Belt - 3rd Dan
Posts: 3411
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2015 9:46 am
Languages: Czech (N), English (C1), French (C2), Spanish (intermediate), German (somewhere on the path), Italian (passive advanced, active basic)
x 9949

Re: Spanish against French: the fight to be the second global language

Postby Cavesa » Thu May 24, 2018 1:57 pm

aokoye wrote:I don't think it's about which language is cool so much as which language, among these two, has the most economic and potentially geopolitical power. It's also not as if we're talking about a set of languages where one is arguably significantly more difficult to learn for large swaths of people than the other. If that were the case my thoughts would be a bit different.


I wholeheartedly agree that the economic and geopolitical power are more important in general. But both French and Spanish are so deep bellow English, that the "coolness" and fun is the main difference in their competition. They are of similar dificulty, that is one more reason. It's like deciding between two candidates for a job. Of course their experience and education are the most important criteria. But when you have two people with very similar CVs, the fact one simply seems to be more pleasant to be around is likely to decide.

The individual learners are making this choice, they are "hiring" a language, and popularity of a language is nothing more than millions and millions of these decisions summed up. So, unless one of the more important criteria changes significantly in the next decades, the less important ones will decide. Therefore it is about the Spanish and French speaking countries and cultures making the languages look as fun as possible at this point.

If Macron wants French to catch up and win this fight (which is logical. People start learning for whatever reason and then the skill will make them more likely to do business with the natives), he is betting on the wrong horse. Hoping that the francophone african countries will suddenly become economical tigers in the next few decades, that is much more than optimism. Hoping they will still be sticking to French so tightly by then, that might be a sign of too high self-esteem of a colonialist country. Instead of trying to convince people all over the world "trust me, French is going to be more important!", his government should just fight for removal of geoblocking on media and give a lot of support to the culture and entertainment industry (the scandinavian countries are a good example these days, they support their cultural export a lot. or if they don't want the state to put that much money into it, they should make the right conditions for the private companies to grow and have the ambition to compete even with the US). Plus, it might be nice to promote use of French in France and not to make it too easy for expats, exchange students, or travellers to get by just with English.

Spanish has the advantage, that should any of the hispanic countries start doing this, it will work. Two or three countries together could produce more than majority of europe together. France is just one country, the others are smaller, or plurilingual, or poor. And Spanish is becoming more important in the US. Once the growing number of natives there fulfill their american dreams, we might even see a part of the Hollywood switching to Spanish.
3 x


Return to “Travel and Culture”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests