Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

An area with study groups for various languages. Group members help each other, share resources and experience. Study groups are permanent but the members rotate and change.
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Chung
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby Chung » Tue Apr 16, 2019 3:33 pm

Axon wrote:A Korean family has opened a cozy little cafe a few minutes from my apartment. They speak some English and good Mandarin but I would like to learn a couple of polite phrases in Korean to order food, pay, and thank them. It's clear that if I could speak Korean, we would use Korean - they're far more comfortable in Korean than other languages.

I can't realistically get any kind of Pimsleur or Teach Yourself shipped to me here in China. This week I'll have the chance to go to a bookstore and check out some courses from a Chinese base.

At this point, I'm only concerned with this one very specific aspect of the language, though of course I know it would serve me well to have a basic foundation. What are some free online audio-based resources that can help me with polite "transactional" Korean? And, taking into account what you folks know about Korean, should I start by memorizing cafe phrases or start with general beginner materials?


Try DLI Headstart Korean

It's a good example of a typical survival course for military personnel (and their families) when they need to deal with locals. Audio is of decent quality overall, and if you put in the work you can build a small but useable repertoire of vocabulary fairly quickly.

A couple of notes are that it's all romanized (*eeeewwww*) and the register is pretty damned formal, in addition to being polite even though I think that these Koreans would be happy to hear any foreigner put in a good effort to speak Korean even if it's pretty formal. Among Koreans (especially in Seoul) it's quite common to encounter something less formal but still polite even in situations where you might think that the more formal register is appropriate.

For something more substantial, and if you don't mind learning online, then try out Korean From Zero (all three volumes are available to use for free online but only the 1st volume is available as a complete free download. If you want the other two volumes, only their audio is a free download; the books aren't free.)

There is some good discussion here about beginners' material for Korean.
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eido
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby eido » Tue Apr 16, 2019 4:54 pm

Axon wrote:What are some free online audio-based resources that can help me with polite "transactional" Korean? And, taking into account what you folks know about Korean, should I start by memorizing cafe phrases or start with general beginner materials?

I don't know necessarily about audio-based resources...

TTMIK is based on podcasts, but they talk a lot and take a long time to get to the point. When they do, it can be cursorily done. The PDFs are the most helpful. They have both romanization and Hangul the last time I looked. They have both free and paid content.
I liked Coursera's courses when I first started out. If Coursera is available in China, it might be a good resource to use. I understand since you asked for audio-based courses you may not want to learn to read Hangul, but it can be pretty easy. If this family lists their menu items in Hangul, it might impress them if you showed them your Hangul reading fluency -- even if it was just reading '카페라떼'. Coursera's courses cover Hangul and very basic shopping situations, like using numbers, a bit of bargaining, eating at a restaurant, and looking at clothes. Both courses are structured differently, and the 'second' (though really still basic and not any more advanced) assumes knowledge of Hangul. You can go through these courses at your own pace and I believe they're still free. They're both video-based, with quizzes interspersed throughout.
If Udemy is available in your country, there's a course another LLORG learner recommended upon a time called "Core Korean". If they're having one of their many sales, you can purchase all four courses in the series for $40-$50. The instructor is a native Korean and his English leaves something to be desired (as some of the translations of Korean sentences in the course seem to lack nuance), but the format of the course is very cool. This course is like an updated FSI/DLI that uses more relaxed drilling and less formal language. You don't have to know Hangul to use it, but it would be helpful. Since it's Udemy, the course is composed of a series of videos. The first course doesn't require you to really watch the screen while you work with it since the instructor goes through the concepts very deliberately in English and Korean, repeating often the important points. The teacher is very active on Udemy and answers any questions you may have. Though, of course, you might ask here and get an answer ;)

That's all I can think of for now.
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eido
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby eido » Sat Apr 20, 2019 11:53 pm

David1917 wrote:In this thread, Prof A suggests using that Francis Park series so, I'd say you made a wise purchase.

I bought the first three books, and they seem very well made. They're in good condition and I enjoy looking through them. The first book, at least, has a guide on how to write Hangul, which I've never learned. I can recognize the letters and read okay, but I don't know how to write them -- that is, proper stroke order and everything. It has a very serious linguistic take on pronunciation. I looked briefly through my Hanja book, the third book in the series, and it seems good, but with all the shiny apps and shortcuts made for learning the Chinese characters these days it makes me waver. It's surely interesting and a good reference.
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olusatrum
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby olusatrum » Tue Jul 16, 2019 3:35 pm

Hi all! I'm trying to pick back up after a while of not studying, and just discovered this forum. I don't really know how to quantify my level of Korean, but in terms of studying I'm mostly focusing on vocab and lots and lots of input right now. I look up grammar principles occasionally as I come across stuff I don't know, but I feel like I'm pretty well set up there.

Why are you interested in Korean?
I really like Korean music, and at some point I thought I might look into learning some word or phrases just for fun. I'd never thought I was interested in languages before but I guess I discovered a passion for it. 2 years later and still going strong
What is your goal for this language?
I'd like to be able to read works of history, nonfiction and literature, especially poetry. I also want to be able to communicate effectively with native speakers. My ultimate stretch goal is to have a firm enough grasp of the language to understand humor and carry my own sense of humor (more or less) into Korean
Do you have a favorite Korean language song?
I like lots of Korean music from all genres. Lately I've been enjoying more and more older music, 노래방 classics, old OSTs and ballads, stuff like that. I love how Hong Jin Young marries old and new and her songs never fail to make me smile

What is your favorite feature of the Korean language that you've encountered so far in your studies?
I like how many words are built out of components that have their own meanings. Not just hanja, but also pure Korean words are often built up like this too. It makes vocab acquisition sort of a satisfying puzzle sometimes, and I like how it almost adds a little bit of meaning underneath the word itself
Have anything else you'd like to share about yourself? Go ahead!
My embarrassing pipe dream is to someday make music in Korea. Not really realistic, but it's fun to daydream about and in a weird way it's kind of a motivator for me. In my free time, my Korean study has to compete with piano and other music stuff. But I have no problem studying on work time, and I do plenty of Anki and reading at work :p
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leosmith
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby leosmith » Mon Sep 02, 2019 3:01 am

Axon wrote:What are some free online audio-based resources that can help me with polite "transactional" Korean? And, taking into account what you folks know about Korean, should I start by memorizing cafe phrases or start with general beginner materials?

Pimsleur is downloadable and there is probably a kindle version of Teach Yourself, but it sounds like you're after phrases. Korean From Zero is a great free online course. They have a lesson on starter phrases, with audio. You'll probably want to add on to those eventually, but it's a good start.

edit: oops, looks like I'm 5 months late :lol:
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Mocha
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby Mocha » Thu Nov 14, 2019 12:33 am

안녕하세요! It's been a long time since I spoke Korean, and seeing this group while looking for a Russian one may have peaked my interest once more! I've been very inconsistent with my studies, so I hope this group can help me out more.
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leosmith
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby leosmith » Thu Nov 14, 2019 10:49 am

Mocha wrote:seeing this group while looking for a Russian one

Welcome, but fyi there is a Russian one here
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Christi
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Re: Korean Study Group / 한국어 스터딩

Postby Christi » Sun Nov 24, 2019 12:39 am

Mocha wrote:안녕하세요! It's been a long time since I spoke Korean, and seeing this group while looking for a Russian one may have peaked my interest once more! I've been very inconsistent with my studies, so I hope this group can help me out more.


Hi, nice to meet you!

I haven't been very active in this group. Never know what to share. I usually share resources (sites I found, books I want to get) and recently what I've learned on my blog. I haven't been all that consistent though :oops:

Edit: I tried reviving the Korean group in the multilingual sub forum to get some kind of running chat going in Korean. If anyone is interested, go check it out and reply!
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