Modern Greek Study Group

An area with study groups for various languages. Group members help each other, share resources and experience. Study groups are permanent but the members rotate and change.
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embici
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Re: Modern Greek Study Group

Postby embici » Tue Apr 14, 2020 8:35 pm

A source of Greek content that some might find helpful is the following YouTube playlist by the Greek TV network, ERT. It is called
Μαθαίνουμε στο Σπίτι (We learn at home). It includes videos of Greek school teachers teaching different subjects at all grade levels.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgeq7ezNgWe94VavlcE6HC0k8RVanZWPe
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nooj
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Re: Modern Greek Study Group

Postby nooj » Mon Aug 24, 2020 1:43 am

Does anyone know of a Greek TV show with Greek subtitles? The ones I've found on YouTube so far only have English subtitles.
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Neurotip
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Re: Modern Greek Study Group

Postby Neurotip » Mon Aug 24, 2020 7:13 pm

nooj wrote:Does anyone know of a Greek TV show with Greek subtitles? The ones I've found on YouTube so far only have English subtitles.

I'd be very interested in this too, if anyone knows of one.
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Iversen
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Re: Modern Greek Study Group

Postby Iversen » Tue Aug 25, 2020 12:00 am

embici wrote:A source of Greek content that some might find helpful is the following YouTube playlist by the Greek TV network, ERT.
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgeq7ezNgWe94VavlcE6HC0k8RVanZWPe


I wonder whether the series was made for use by real school kids during the corona pandemy, but whatever the reason: I have so far only listened to part of one lesson, but it was spoken very clearly and not too fast - no histrionics there.

I have been given Greek special attention for a week now, and a few hours of listening to something like this will definitely be beneficial - until now my Greek has been almost exclusively based on the written language. If the rest of the lectures are as easy to listen to listen to as the first one then I'll definitely use this source during the upcoming week.

OK, no subtitles, but I can live without them.
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Re: Modern Greek Study Group

Postby Sunday » Fri Aug 28, 2020 12:35 pm

nooj wrote:Does anyone know of a Greek TV show with Greek subtitles? The ones I've found on YouTube so far only have English subtitles.


For some reasons I also find it very difficult to find original greek material with greek subtitles. You can find something, but it definitely looks like much less compared to other languages.. I understand that not a lot of foreigners are probably studying the language, but I wonder how people with hearing disabilities manage within the country.

In any case, to your point, there is a very famous greek series from the 90' called Sto para pente you can find on you tube. A user has added greek subs for a few episodes of the first series:
https://youtu.be/WjHRkyp0X4w
I remember that some of the comments of the videos were thanking the user for uploading the subs, so finally also who cannot hear can enjoy such a famous show and not be left out (as if also the DVDs and supports did not have greek subs).

I think sto para pente is quite a difficult one to follow - very fast and a lot of slang & specific references to cultural aspects. Not sure about your level but I did find it difficult.

a more accessible one would be το σόι σου (so I have been told) but I could not find any sub. Alphatv.gr has plenty of other original greek series available for free online but, guess what, no subs - which is a pity!
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Re: Modern Greek Study Group

Postby nooj » Fri Aug 28, 2020 1:45 pm

but I wonder how people with hearing disabilities manage within the country.


I asked some Greek people and they say that there are often subtitles for Deaf people in Greece on TV shows when they are transmitted but that they are not made available for public use.
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Re: Modern Greek Study Group

Postby kanewai » Wed Dec 23, 2020 10:53 pm

You all have room for one more in the group? I'm finally taking the plunge into learning modern Greek. So far I've taken the following steps:

  • Used e-credits to buy a ticket to Greece for next September (assuming the world is somewhat more stable by then)
  • Ordered Assimil: Le Grec
  • Downloaded & started working through Complete Greek from Language Transfer
  • And the biggest step: I told the lady who owns the Greek restaurant near my work that I was going to start learning her language.

The restaurant owner immediately dropped half-a-dozen phrases on me that she said I should learn first. That was a positive omen for my first day - it's a good sign when native-speakers are excited to meet a language learner. That is not always the case.

It will probably take me a month or two to finish LT, after which I'll need to look for a nice, concise grammar book. I've looked through the posts on Greek resources here, and haven't seen any course makes me think: this is the one I need. And I inherited the Pimsleur course years back, so I'll need to pull those CDs off the shelf. I'll probably wait until summer for that.
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Neurotip
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Re: Modern Greek Study Group

Postby Neurotip » Thu Dec 24, 2020 7:13 pm

kanewai wrote:You all have room for one more in the group? I'm finally taking the plunge into learning modern Greek.

Awesome! Good decision kanewai. It's a lovely and fascinating language, you won't regret it.

kanewai wrote:The restaurant owner immediately dropped half-a-dozen phrases on me that she said I should learn first. That was a positive omen for my first day - it's a good sign when native-speakers are excited to meet a language learner. That is not always the case.

I agree, and my limited experience is also that Greek people are enthusiastic about ξένοι learning their language. I had a Greek colleague who was very supportive for example. I can't be of much help on the courses front, except to join the chorus recommending LT. Good luck though and happy to help if I can!
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Re: Modern Greek Study Group

Postby Agorima » Fri Dec 25, 2020 8:18 pm

Neurotip wrote:
kanewai wrote:You all have room for one more in the group? I'm finally taking the plunge into learning modern Greek.

Awesome! Good decision kanewai. It's a lovely and fascinating language, you won't regret it.

kanewai wrote:The restaurant owner immediately dropped half-a-dozen phrases on me that she said I should learn first. That was a positive omen for my first day - it's a good sign when native-speakers are excited to meet a language learner. That is not always the case.

I agree, and my limited experience is also that Greek people are enthusiastic about ξένοι learning their language. I had a Greek colleague who was very supportive for example. I can't be of much help on the courses front, except to join the chorus recommending LT. Good luck though and happy to help if I can!


After 6 months of staying in Greece, I went to a restaurant with some local friends.
A woman I never met before started speaking in English to me.
Once I replied in Greek, without doing any mistakes, she was very surprised.
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kanewai
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Re: Modern Greek Study Group

Postby kanewai » Thu Jan 07, 2021 12:37 am

Two weeks in, and I'm still in that happy-excited phase of learning a new language (next up ... the 'oh crap this is hard' phase).

I'm on lesson 25 of Language Transfer. I tend to do each lesson multiple times. For example, if I listen to lessons 1-5 on one day, I'll listen to lessons 3-7 the next, etc. It's not a rigid system; it depends on how much new information is in each one. This style works for me. The only drawback is that I start to think about doing Arabic, and German, and Swahili, et al, all at the same time. But I resist.

And while Mihalis (of LT) says not to try to read, I'm ignoring him & starting in on Assimil. And I'm glad I did: modern Greek spelling is nothing at all like I pictured! I've flirted with Homeric Greek, and have certain pronunciations stuck in my mind. I would have never thought of pronouncing Γειά σου like "ya su." I would have probably gone for "gay-ya sow" if it weren't for the recording.

Once I finish the lesson I transcribe it. Luckily they're only three or four sentences long at this point. I know how to slowly print each letter, but I'd like to develop a more natural system of handwriting. Assimil has a one-page example, but it looks horribly complicated. I've been using this sheet, as well as this video from Easy Greek:



Hopefully these are good resources - I'm open to any recommendations, or ground-checking!
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