German group

An area with study groups for various languages. Group members help each other, share resources and experience. Study groups are permanent but the members rotate and change.
gsbod
Green Belt
Posts: 487
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 3:22 pm
Location: UK
Languages: English (native)
German (C1)
French (B1)
Spanish (A1)
Japanese (N2)
Language Log: viewtopic.php?t=1152
x 1424

Re: German group

Postby gsbod » Thu Aug 20, 2020 9:05 pm

księżycowy wrote:Any recommendations for readers that are at the A1 level?


I quite like the Lernkrimis from Circon Verlag. For German there are now volumes available from A1-B2, all monolingual German, but once you've mastered German you'll be able to use the Lernkrimis they publish for other languages too, which include vocabulary and grammar notes in German.
3 x

User avatar
mentecuerpo
Blue Belt
Posts: 500
Joined: Sun Jun 23, 2019 6:15 am
Location: El Salvador, Centroamerica, but lives in Phoenix, Arizona.
Languages: Spanish (N) English (B2) Italian (A2) German (A1)
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 18#p155218
x 643

Re: German group

Postby mentecuerpo » Sun Aug 30, 2020 9:19 am

Bach: St. Matthew Passion - 20. Ich will bei meinem Jesu wachen - Herreweghe

Since I was a teenager, I have listened to Bach, thanks to my father.
This is my favorite passage.

My question is, how much has changed from this work regarding sound compared to modern German?

Does it sound different in modern language standards?

Just curious.

https://youtu.be/pl9pFtkAsiE

https://youtu.be/JMZhWpg9OsM

https://youtu.be/SguNpDynB2k
0 x

gsbod
Green Belt
Posts: 487
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 3:22 pm
Location: UK
Languages: English (native)
German (C1)
French (B1)
Spanish (A1)
Japanese (N2)
Language Log: viewtopic.php?t=1152
x 1424

Re: German group

Postby gsbod » Mon Aug 31, 2020 1:05 pm

For those interested in a German podcast on the theme of learning how to learn, a recent podcast episode in the SWR2 Wissen series called "Neuronale Fitness - Wie lernt das Gehirn?" may be of interest.

Recent podcasts in the series can be found here: https://www.swr.de/swr2/programm/podcast-swr2-wissen-100.html
4 x

User avatar
tungemål
Green Belt
Posts: 440
Joined: Sat Apr 06, 2019 3:56 pm
Location: Norway
Languages: Norwegian (N)
English, German, Spanish, Japanese, Dutch, Polish
x 725

Re: German group

Postby tungemål » Mon Aug 31, 2020 2:09 pm

mentecuerpo wrote:Bach: St. Matthew Passion - 20. Ich will bei meinem Jesu wachen - Herreweghe

Since I was a teenager, I have listened to Bach, thanks to my father.
This is my favorite passage.

My question is, how much has changed from this work regarding sound compared to modern German?
...


Hi.
Do you mean how the written German has changed, or really how the sound of the language has changed? We've only got the text from Bach, no recording, so we can't really know exactly how they pronounced the words in Bach's time.
0 x

User avatar
mentecuerpo
Blue Belt
Posts: 500
Joined: Sun Jun 23, 2019 6:15 am
Location: El Salvador, Centroamerica, but lives in Phoenix, Arizona.
Languages: Spanish (N) English (B2) Italian (A2) German (A1)
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 18#p155218
x 643

Re: German group

Postby mentecuerpo » Tue Sep 01, 2020 4:51 am

tungemål wrote:
Hi.
Do you mean how the written German has changed, or really how the sound of the language has changed? We've only got the text from Bach, no recording, so we can't really know exactly how they pronounced the words in Bach's time.


Good point! Has written German from Bach's time changed a lot compared to modern German? Probably, yes.

Can a modern German speaker understand the songs singed in Bach's pieces?

Just curious.

Thanks.
0 x

Dragon27
Orange Belt
Posts: 228
Joined: Tue Aug 25, 2015 6:40 am
Languages: Russian (N)
English - decent
Polish - decent comprehension, basic speaking
Spanish - passive intermediate
Tatar and German - false beginner, actively studying
x 451

Re: German group

Postby Dragon27 » Tue Sep 01, 2020 5:47 am

mentecuerpo wrote:Good point! Has written German from Bach's time changed a lot compared to modern German? Probably, yes.

What do you mean by "a lot"? Without looking at any examples, Johann Sebastian Bach lived in 1685 – 1750, which is relatively not that long ago for the language to change a lot. If we compare it to English, Jonathan Swift (1667 – 1745) and Daniel Defoe (1660 – 1731) are popular writers and their novels (Gulliver's Travels and Robinson Crusoe, for instance) are pretty much readable to these days.

mentecuerpo wrote:songs singed

Irregular verb, "sung". The verb bothered me, so I couldn't help correcting :)
Last edited by Dragon27 on Tue Sep 01, 2020 11:33 am, edited 1 time in total.
0 x

User avatar
tungemål
Green Belt
Posts: 440
Joined: Sat Apr 06, 2019 3:56 pm
Location: Norway
Languages: Norwegian (N)
English, German, Spanish, Japanese, Dutch, Polish
x 725

Re: German group

Postby tungemål » Tue Sep 01, 2020 8:17 am

I would also say that the language has hardly changed at all since Bach's time. Here is the text of die Matthäus-Passion with a translation:
http://www.emmanuelmusic.org/notes_tran ... bwv244.htm

There may be couple of words that are oldfashioned or in a literary or religious style, but I guess native Germans would be familiar with them. Then there are a few variants: for instance "Herze" instead of "Herz".
0 x

DaveAgain
Blue Belt
Posts: 816
Joined: Mon Aug 27, 2018 11:26 am
Languages: Eng (n)
x 1409

Re: German group

Postby DaveAgain » Wed Sep 09, 2020 11:18 am

„Dieser schreckliche Hut! Wo hat sie ihn her?

https://www.dw.com/de/etwas-durch-die-b ... l-18745487

Deepl.com translates "wo hat sie ihn her?" as "Where did she get it?"

Can you please tell me what "her" means in the sentence above?
0 x

User avatar
tungemål
Green Belt
Posts: 440
Joined: Sat Apr 06, 2019 3:56 pm
Location: Norway
Languages: Norwegian (N)
English, German, Spanish, Japanese, Dutch, Polish
x 725

Re: German group

Postby tungemål » Wed Sep 09, 2020 2:34 pm

DaveAgain wrote:
„Dieser schreckliche Hut! Wo hat sie ihn her?

https://www.dw.com/de/etwas-durch-die-b ... l-18745487

Deepl.com translates "wo hat sie ihn her?" as "Where did she get it?"

Can you please tell me what "her" means in the sentence above?


"her" means "from" - indicating coming from somewhere far from the speaker. Can also refer to time.

Compare "woher" which means "where from".
Last edited by tungemål on Thu Sep 10, 2020 2:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
2 x

User avatar
BalancingAct
Orange Belt
Posts: 109
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2017 6:37 am
Languages: Mandarin (N), Cantonese (N), English (prof.), French (Adv.- prof.), Italian (Adv.), German (Adv. receptive), Spanish (Int., reading only)
x 164

Re: German group

Postby BalancingAct » Wed Sep 09, 2020 4:32 pm

"Wo hat sie ihn her?" means "where did she find it?"
1 x


Return to “Study Groups”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests