German group

An area with study groups for various languages. Group members help each other, share resources and experience. Study groups are permanent but the members rotate and change.
Kraut
Blue Belt
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Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2017 10:37 pm
Languages: German (N)
French (C)
English (C)
Spanish (A2)
Lithuanian
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Re: German group

Postby Kraut » Sun Jan 26, 2020 2:31 am

The Snow Queen

the program guide says it has audiodescription and subtitles

https://www.kika.de/sonntagsmaerchen/sendung118792.html
Die Schneekönigin

Heute, 12:00 Uhr
Gerda und Kay sind Nachbarskinder, die sich sehr lieb haben. An einem Wintertag entführt die Schneekönigin Kay in ihren Eispalast. Alle glauben, Kay sei tot. Doch Gerda macht sich auf, um ihren Freund zu suchen. Ihre Reise führt Gerda in das blühende Reich der Flora, in ein sommerliches Schloss, zu Räubern und in die verschneite Welt des hohen Nordens. Überall begegnen der kleinen Gerda Gefahren und auch Verlockungen.
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CarlyD
Green Belt
Posts: 436
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 5:44 pm
Location: California, USA
Languages: English (N), Spanish--A1/A2, German--now studying (A1.1)
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Re: German group

Postby CarlyD » Mon Feb 03, 2020 5:30 am

For your enjoyment--this review was left for a German textbook. Seriously.

Verified Purchase
I began studying this book so I could go to "Dutchland" but it turns out that "Dutchland" is the Netherlands. I spent 2 semesters reading this book and then I found out that people speak Dutch in the Netherlands and that "Deustch" means German IN THE GERMAN LANGUAGE! I was so baffled. I'm giving 4 stars because of this confusion.
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366 Challenge German and Spanish: 244 / 366
Super Challenge German Films: 20 / 4500
Super Challenge German Books: 223 / 2500
Super Challenge Spanish Films: 0 / 9000
Super Challenge Spanish Books: 0 / 5000

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Chung
Green Belt
Posts: 456
Joined: Mon Jul 06, 2015 9:39 pm
Languages: SPEAKS: English*, French
STUDIES: German, Italian, Slovak
STUDIED: Azeri, BCMS/SC, Czech, Estonian, Finnish, Hungarian, Korean, Latin, Northern Saami, Polish, Russian, Slovenian, Turkish, Ukrainian
DABBLED: Bashkir, Chuvash, Crimean Tatar, Inari Saami, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Latvian, Lithuanian, Meadow Mari, Mongolian, Romanian, Tatar, Turkmen, Tuvan, Uzbek
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Re: German group

Postby Chung » Mon Feb 17, 2020 6:19 am

I thought that I'd share a tidbit that I'm starting to incorporate into my studies..

As an alternative to reading chlldren's fiction (translations of Harry Potter and Le Petit Prince are well-worn recommendations) as the first "real and authentic" text, how about looking at children's non-fiction? One place to start could be a children's encyclopedia (Kinderlexikon in German and similar books contain "Jugendlexikon" or "Grundschulwissen" in the title). Unlike reading a regular encyclopedia with articles meant for adults, articles in kids' enclyclopedias are shorter and explain concepts in simpler language which could be more enticing to someone wanting to read non-fiction but who's only at high-beginner or intermeidate. Another place to start could be any non-fiction book for kids or teenagers about history, botany, anatomy, chemistry etc. - just about any subject/discipline that interests you. German translations of the illustrated non-fiction books that are published by Dorling-Kindersley are easy to find on Amazon, and with a bit of digging you might find German translations of long-lost non-fiction books that you grew up with.

If you don't want to spend money on a cheap second-hand encyclopedia, then how about reading articles for free on Klexikon? It's like German Wikipedia for kids but is controlled tightly enough by its editors that all of its 2,800 articles (and counting) cover the main points of a subject in ways that a pre-teen can understand. The editorial discipline also means that there are no stubs and the differences in quality and length between one article and the next aren't as stark as you'd see in Wikipedia which is more of a free-for-all and littered with stubs and redirections, to say nothing of sockpuppets and anonymous contributors.
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DaveAgain
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Languages: Eng (n)
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Re: German group

Postby DaveAgain » Mon Feb 17, 2020 7:50 am

Chung wrote:As an alternative to reading chlldren's fiction (translations of Harry Potter and Le Petit Prince are well-worn recommendations) as the first "real and authentic" text, how about looking at children's non-fiction?
I've seen this recommended before, by a French tutor on YouTube. She also recommended novels with a lot of dialogue as easier reading, e.g. Georges Simenon. (Professor Arguelles mentioned that conversation requires a smaller vocabulary than reading too.)
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Stefan
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Re: German group

Postby Stefan » Fri Feb 28, 2020 10:38 pm

There's a German site named mydealz.de where people post deals they find and then you can upvote or downvote them. One of the users publishes a weekly summary of recommended free movies available on streaming services - with corresponding imdb rating, trailer and the date it will be removed. They recently also began publishing a similar summary for ebooks (mainly Kindle).

https://www.mydealz.de/search?q=Streams+zum+Wochenende
https://www.mydealz.de/search?q=ebooks+zum+wochenende

My main complain with MediathekView was to actually filter through thousands of published videos to find something decent so this is really useful for me. I'm also subscribed to ARD's weekly newsletter but it's only a handful of selected movies.

At the moment I recommend Babylon Berlin. There's also Das Boot although I haven't seen it. Both with subtitles.
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Sahmilat
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Location: Texas
Languages: English
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Re: German group

Postby Sahmilat » Sat Mar 21, 2020 10:52 pm

Hey, I'm looking for a good reference grammar that's in German. Is something like the Duden Grammatik volume what I'm looking for, or is there a better one? I already have Hammer's, but I assume there's a more authoritative one in German. Thanks.
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Doitsujin
Orange Belt
Posts: 226
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 6:21 pm
Languages: German (N)
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Re: German group

Postby Doitsujin » Sun Mar 22, 2020 7:11 pm

Sahmilat wrote:Hey, I'm looking for a good reference grammar that's in German. Is something like the Duden Grammatik volume what I'm looking for, or is there a better one? I already have Hammer's, but I assume there's a more authoritative one in German. Thanks.
You might want to look into the following books by Joachim Buscha and Gerhard Helbig:

Deutsche Grammatik: Ein Handbuch für den Ausländerunterricht
Übungsgrammatik Deutsch

(Select the HTML5 preview.)
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tungemål
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Location: Norway
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English, German, Spanish, Japanese, Dutch, Polish
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Re: German group

Postby tungemål » Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:26 pm

Sahmilat wrote:Hey, I'm looking for a good reference grammar that's in German. Is something like the Duden Grammatik volume what I'm looking for, or is there a better one? I already have Hammer's, but I assume there's a more authoritative one in German. Thanks.


I am using this one: B-Grammatik: Übungsgrammatik Deutsch als Fremdsprache. It is übersichtlich and covers most aspects of German grammar. There is also a C-Grammatik that goes even more in depth, but I think this one should be sufficient for me.
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Sahmilat
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Re: German group

Postby Sahmilat » Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:00 am

Sorry, I realize I didn't clarify this in my original question. I'm looking for an authoritative reference work that native speakers might use, not really a practice book or book for learners. I'll still check those out though, I'm sure they will be helpful in their own right, so thanks for the suggestions.

EDIT: That said, the Buscha & Helbig book might be what I'm looking for. Thanks. Any other suggestions are of course still welcome.
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DaveAgain
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Re: German group

Postby DaveAgain » Tue May 05, 2020 9:42 am

äste and geäst both translate as 'branches'

does the ge prefix have a meaning?
Man sah die Äste vor sich ...
... mit dem Fuß im tieferliegenden Geäst herumstochern ...

(Quote taken from Die Geschichte von Herrn Sommer ISBN: 9783257226645)
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