Spanish Group

An area with study groups for various languages. Group members help each other, share resources and experience. Study groups are permanent but the members rotate and change.
NoManches
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Re: Spanish Group

Postby NoManches » Mon Aug 06, 2018 9:06 pm

I'd like to share a cool podcast series I found, and I'm hoping that the rest of you might be able to share some similar podcasts with me and the rest of the group.

For me, I really need something that holds my interest. I can only force myself to listen to things that don't interest me for a short period of time. Regular podcasts can be helpful if the topic is something that interests me. If it's not something interesting but has good audio quality, I'll listen simply for the sake of improving my Spanish. However I have found that when it comes to language learning, finding native content that interests you is key.

A few days ago, I came across what I will label a "podcast mini series". It's called <<El Gran Apagón>> and it is available on iVoox, online, and through a smartphone app that includes other podcasts produced by the same group. This is the website where you can find the app, and a bunch of podcasts including the one I mentioned:


https://www.podiumpodcast.com

I really like the idea of a podcast with a story to it, and I should mention that this way different than an audiobook or a "short story'. This is nothing more than a radio show, something that was popular "back in the day" (look up the "Golden Age of Radio")

Another cool "mini series' I found is called <<Mejore vete, Christina>> . This is definitely a mini series that gets you hooked and makes you want to find out what happens next, although it is way different than El Gran Apagón.


https://www.univision.com/noticias/inmi ... e-cristina


I definitely like the format of Radio Ambulante, but this is a little different and I really hope I can find some similar programs.

So the question is: Is anybody familiar with any Spanish radio programs or mini series? Or any cool podcasts in general? I'm hoping to download a bunch and spend a few days binge listening.
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Jaleel10
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Re: Spanish Group

Postby Jaleel10 » Wed Aug 08, 2018 8:32 am

Por fin, encontré algo, ¡ostras!

Finding serialised/story-telling podcasts is hard lol. Especially with my limited Spanish skills haha.

Sangre Celestial. An 8-part radio novela. Love. Lies. A secret recipe. Join Kate del Castillo and follow the adventures of the twins, Sol y Mundo Lucero, as they try to discover the truth about the death of their father, Arthur. It seems like it was pretty popular last year. Mexican Spanish but people have commented that there are some English and Spanglish as well.

Bienvido a la vida peligrosa10 - part radio drama. Professor Uribe arrives in Mexico to give a lecture on philosophy at the university. But what was to be a quiet visit to the northern lands becomes a story of love, violence and drug trafficking from which it is impossible to escape. Spain and Mexican Spanish.

Tentación a medianoche 13-part radio novela, It tells the story of a group of Spanish tourists who, on their journey through Romania, begin to live through multitude of supernatural and paranormal experiences that will lead them to situations of temporary insanity and even endanger their own lives. Spain Spanish.

A podcast I couldn't really find any information on but judging by the comments it seems people seem to love it:
La Llama Viva . 4 episodes

Just gonna leave you guys with this popular saying in my country, translated to Spanish of course: ¡Nunca volváis a decir que no hago nada por vosotros! :lol: Espero que os gusten y os parezcan divertidos.
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Jaleel10
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Re: Spanish Group

Postby Jaleel10 » Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:35 am

This morning I came across some text and audio showing some differences between Standard Spanish and Colloquial Spanish (from Spain). Thought I'd share with you guys

Audio

Versión estándar:

José: Hola Jorge, ¿qué tal estás?

Jorge: Bien, estoy en casa como de costumbre.

José: Muy bien, te llamaba por si te apetecía ir un rato al centro y tomarnos unas cervezas en un sitio que me gusta mucho.

Jorge: Me parece un buen plan, voy a coger el abrigo y en media hora estoy en el centro.

José: Perfecto, tráete si puedes tus altavoces portátiles por si vamos más tarde al parque.

Jorge: Pero ¿tú quieres ir de fiesta por la noche?

José: No sé, luego lo decidimos según nos parezca.

Jorge: De acuerdo, pues ahora nos encontramos.

José: Vale, en la estatua del centro a las cinco como siempre.

Jorge: Hasta ahora.

------------------------------------------------------------------

Versión coloquial:

José: Qué pasa chaval, ¿cómo lo llevas?

Jorge: Bien tío, aquí ando en casa como siempre.

José: De buti, es que he dicho, voy a llamar a este, pa ver si le hace ir un ratejo pal centro y pillarnos unas birras en un sitio que me mola mazo.

Jorge: Guay tío, pillo la chupa y en media hora estoy allí.

José: Genial tío, pilla si puedes la movida que tienes para escuchar música por si vamos al parque luego.

Jorge: pero ¿quieres ir de farra o qué?

José: No sé tío, luego ya lo vemos.

Jorge: Ok tío, pues ahora te veo.

José: Vale, en la estatua del centro a las cinco como siempre.

Jorge: Venga, taora macho.

(Sorry for the formatting)
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Ser
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Re: Spanish Group

Postby Ser » Mon Aug 27, 2018 3:00 pm

Very interesting. I especially liked ando en casa.

Here is what the dialogue would be in my dialect (El Salvador). I don't recommend learning my dialect, there's not that many Salvadorans and we're not exactly an economically important country, but maybe you'll find something interesting as well.

    José: Qué ondas Jorge, ¿cómo te va, vos?
    Jorge: Bien vos, aquí toy en la casa como siempre.
    José: Chivo, te llamaba para ver si te sonaba ir al centro un rato por un patín, a un lugar que me llega.
    Jorge: Plantoso, ai vamos. Solo dejá que agarre una chumpa y como en media hora toy en el centro.
    José: Tá bueno, ai traete también los speakers [loh esˈpikeɾ] por si vamos al parque después.
    Jorge: ¿Y que querés ir de parranda en la noche?
    José: No sé vos, luego ai vemos si nos dan ganas.
    Jorge: Va pues, ai nos vemos entonces.
    José: Va, en la estatua del centro a las cinco como siempre.
    Jorge: Salú.

The adverb ai, pronounced [aj] (the same as ay), means something like "at some/that point (in time)" or "when you/we find it convenient". In El Salvador we do use second-person pronouns (and only second-person pronouns) at the end of a phrase or a sentence very often, and these pronouns mean something like "would you believe it?". The linguist John M. Lipski in his survey of Spanish dialects said these Salvadoran second-person pronouns often translate well as simply "dude(s)" (What's up, dude?... I don't know dude...), but I think the range is a bit larger than that (and it's equally common for women to use these pronouns too).
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Navik
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Re: Spanish Group

Postby Navik » Tue Aug 28, 2018 5:56 pm

Jaleel10 wrote:Versión coloquial:

José: Qué pasa chaval, ¿cómo lo llevas?

Jorge: Bien tío, aquí ando en casa como siempre.

José: De buti, es que he dicho, voy a llamar a este, pa ver si le hace ir un ratejo pal centro y pillarnos unas birras en un sitio que me mola mazo.

Jorge: Guay tío, pillo la chupa y en media hora estoy allí.

José: Genial tío, pilla si puedes la movida que tienes para escuchar música por si vamos al parque luego.

Jorge: pero ¿quieres ir de farra o qué?

José: No sé tío, luego ya lo vemos.

Jorge: Ok tío, pues ahora te veo.

José: Vale, en la estatua del centro a las cinco como siempre.

Jorge: Venga, taora macho.

(Sorry for the formatting)

Very colloquial indeed. Personally, I don't speak like this, I don't even use some of these words when speaking to my friends. It's true that some people shorten "para" to "pa", which I sometimes do, but ONLY if I speak to certain people. "De buti" should be "Dabuti" which comes from "Dabuten". I looked it up and apparently it comes from "Da Butti" which was understood as "very good", rather than the name of a wine in the 17th century. I do believe, however, that some of the words that appear in this dialogue might be in use in other parts of Spain.

I would say:

fiesta instead of farra.
chaqueta instead of chupa.
la cosa instead of la movida.

To be honest, I firmly believe that none of my friends would speak like this and if I was ever addressed by someone in that way, I would burst into laughter.
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Jaleel10
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Re: Spanish Group

Postby Jaleel10 » Tue Aug 28, 2018 6:40 pm

Navik wrote:Very colloquial indeed. Personally, I don't speak like this, I don't even use some of these words when speaking to my friends.
To be honest, I firmly believe that none of my friends would speak like this and if I was ever addressed by someone in that way, I would burst into laughter.


Thanks, Navik. It's probably as you said, very colloquial. Online, I have 2 Andalusian friends, one from Sevilla, one from Cadiz - I practically have to beg them each time to 1) try and speak normally and 2) stop using slang :lol: I have a few other friends from the other parts of Spain and they never use slang with me. So it's nice to hear there is no pressure on me to speak like that :)

Ser wrote:Here is what the dialogue would be in my dialect


Oh, interesting. I will admit that I have never really exposed myself to Salvadoran Spanish, in fact, upon reading your message last night, I decided to watch a few Youtube videos. It's quite the accent you guys have there :lol: I picked up a lot of slang too and I could definitely see what you meant by the second-person pronouns thing.
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Jaleel10
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Re: Spanish Group

Postby Jaleel10 » Thu Sep 06, 2018 7:39 am

Quick questions (excuse the lack of technical terms).

Is the r at the end of words trilled or flapped? (hablar, operador, etc.)
Ayudarle or ayudarlo? (ignoring leísmo because I have heard ayudarle from latin americans)
What the hell is 'yeísmo'? (Explícamelo como si tuviese 5 años :oops:, all these IPA symbols confuse the heck out of me )
What's up the verb renunciar in this context? Why isn't it "nunca te renunciaré"
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Ogrim
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Re: Spanish Group

Postby Ogrim » Thu Sep 06, 2018 9:55 am

Jaleel10 wrote:Quick questions (excuse the lack of technical terms).

Is the r at the end of words trilled or flapped? (hablar, operador, etc.)
Ayudarle or ayudarlo? (ignoring leísmo because I have heard ayudarle from latin americans)
What the hell is 'yeísmo'? (Explícamelo como si tuviese 5 años :oops:, all these IPA symbols confuse the heck out of me )
What's up the verb renunciar in this context? Why isn't it "nunca te renunciaré"


In Spain it is certainly flapped in most (all?) dialects. Some people may use trilled r for emphasis, or jokingly.

Definitely ayudarle.

Yeísmo describes the phenomenon whereby the palatal sound rendered as double l in Spanish, like in the word calle is pronounced like a -y- sound rather than a sound similar to pronouncing /ly/ as a single consonant. (Note that the -y- here is to be pronounced as in English yes). In Spain most people nowadays practice yeísmo.

Renunciar is a verb that requires the preposition a. You can't say *Renuncio el vino, it is always Renuncio al vino, el presidente renuncia a presentarse a las próximas elecciones, no renuncio a ella, etc.
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Jaleel10
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Re: Spanish Group

Postby Jaleel10 » Thu Sep 06, 2018 9:58 am

Thanks, Ogrim :) Really appreciate it.
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iguanamon
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Re: Spanish Group

Postby iguanamon » Fri Sep 07, 2018 12:34 am

I wrote in my log about a website with free and legal ebooks- novels and short stories downloadable in epub, kindle format (mobi), and text:
Recently, while helping someone else here on the forum, I remembered a website with free and legal ebooks in Spanish, back when I got my first kindle and needed something to put on it. The website badosa.com has 34 ebooks in Spanish downloadable in several formats and can be read online also. The authors are generally contemporary- there are a couple of classic public domain books there too. These authors/writers are generally not established and the site has given them a platform for exposure. They're not all novels, some are short stories.
I've read a few of these books in the past and liked them. I downloaded a short story- a murder mystery called Asesinato en el laboratorio de idiomas by Alm@ Perez. I'm about halfway finished with it and I'm enjoying it... not bad for free and legal.
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