Italian study group

An area with study groups for various languages. Group members help each other, share resources and experience. Study groups are permanent but the members rotate and change.
dampingwire
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Re: Italian study group

Postby dampingwire » Sat Sep 07, 2019 11:12 pm

The Corriere della Sera used to have a feature where you could click on a word in an article and you'd get the definition in Italian but also in English and French. That no longer seems to be there.

If you're OK with just Italian then these seem to be quite good:

http://www.grandidizionari.it/Dizionario_Italiano/

and

http://www.treccani.it/vocabolario/
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StringerBell
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Re: Italian study group

Postby StringerBell » Sat Sep 07, 2019 11:47 pm

Are you talking about for use on a computer or a device? On the computer I often use Reverso Context. It's not perfect, but it's decent at recognizing idioms and expressions, and even what I'm trying to type when I misspell something.

https://context.reverso.net/translation ... n-english/
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Re: Italian study group

Postby IronMike » Sun Sep 08, 2019 12:05 am

StringerBell wrote:Are you talking about for use on a computer or a device? On the computer I often use Reverso Context. It's not perfect, but it's decent at recognizing idioms and expressions, and even what I'm trying to type when I misspell something.

https://context.reverso.net/translation ... n-english/

I'm talking about on my iPhone. Mostly because I need one while I'm on the train. I will try the Reverso Context on the computer though. Grazie!
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jeff_lindqvist
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Re: Italian study group

Postby jeff_lindqvist » Sun Sep 08, 2019 7:22 am

dampingwire wrote:lascio loro un messaggio would work but not loro lascio un messagio, which is where the blank would lead you.

gli is what I would probably say. I suspect that's acceptable in speech but perhaps not in writing now (and not acceptable in either for my parents' generation).


Grazie. So, gli in speech, but in writing? Loro?
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dampingwire
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Re: Italian study group

Postby dampingwire » Mon Sep 09, 2019 11:05 pm

jeff_lindqvist wrote:
dampingwire wrote:lascio loro un messaggio would work but not loro lascio un messagio, which is where the blank would lead you.

gli is what I would probably say. I suspect that's acceptable in speech but perhaps not in writing now (and not acceptable in either for my parents' generation).


Grazie. So, gli in speech, but in writing? Loro?


That would be my gut feel, but as with all these things, I expect that you'll encounter both "gli" and "loro" in both forms, with the former on the way up and the latter on the way down.
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dampingwire
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Re: Italian study group

Postby dampingwire » Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:12 pm

PfifltriggPi wrote:I've been using Wordreference. So far it's been quite nice, although I must admit the website is a bit more userfriendly than the app. In addition to bilingual Italian-English/English-Italian modes, it also has an Italian monolingual dictionary and a verb conjugator. I'm still trying to find a good French-Italian dictionary, either online, in paper or preferably both though, so I'll update if I do.


As you like wordreference, perhaps its IT<->FR dictionary will do:

https://www.wordreference.com/itfr/

?
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PfifltriggPi
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Re: Italian study group

Postby PfifltriggPi » Fri Oct 11, 2019 12:30 am

dampingwire wrote:
PfifltriggPi wrote:I've been using Wordreference. So far it's been quite nice, although I must admit the website is a bit more userfriendly than the app. In addition to bilingual Italian-English/English-Italian modes, it also has an Italian monolingual dictionary and a verb conjugator. I'm still trying to find a good French-Italian dictionary, either online, in paper or preferably both though, so I'll update if I do.


As you like wordreference, perhaps its IT<->FR dictionary will do:

https://www.wordreference.com/itfr/

?

I did not know it had such a thing. I still want a paper one though, but thank you for pointing this out.
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mentecuerpo
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Re: Italian study group

Postby mentecuerpo » Fri Oct 11, 2019 4:43 am

jeff_lindqvist wrote:
dampingwire wrote:lascio loro un messaggio would work but not loro lascio un messagio, which is where the blank would lead you.

gli is what I would probably say. I suspect that's acceptable in speech but perhaps not in writing now (and not acceptable in either for my parents' generation).


Grazie. So, gli in speech, but in writing? Loro?


I found this on my babbel italian, maybe is relevant.
"Do you remember? The 3rd pers., pl. of unstressed indirect object pronouns can be either gli or loro. Loro always comes after the verb, whilst gli comes before."
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golyplot
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Re: Italian study group

Postby golyplot » Sat Oct 12, 2019 6:08 pm

When I was researching Italian, I saw a lot of people saying it was less regular and more difficult than Spanish, and they weren't kidding. Italian is crazy!

As if having four endings wasn't enough, half the words don't even follow the normal o/a/i/e pattern. And there's a lot of random spelling changes too between the different declensions of a word. How do you all keep track of it? Just brute force practice?
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Ccaesar
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Re: Italian study group

Postby Ccaesar » Sat Oct 12, 2019 6:21 pm

Actually Italian is pretty regular in that regard.
Rule of thumbs:
the majority of substantives ending with a/trice or are female by nature are feminine. Exceptions are word borrowed from Greek "Problema, poeta.."
most titles ending in "-e" can be both masculin or feminin, but always end in the plural "i" (like the "e" adjectives).

Most borrowed words are invariable "il computer i computer"
The majority of words ending in "o" are masculin.
A big exception are words that have been reduced. Such as "il radio", which used to be a longer word ending with an "a".
Those rules will get you pretty far. I don't have time for a long explaination, but this convers a large portion
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