French listening and oral production

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Severine
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Re: French listening and oral production

Postby Severine » Sun Mar 24, 2024 4:41 am

DaveAgain wrote:I just came across a short video that has an early recording of the Parisien accent, made by Ferdinand Brunot in 1912.

A search of the bnf.fr website brings up more recordings, and publications by Mr Brunot.


Thank you for sharing this. Absolutely delightful.

tastyonions wrote:A nice little discussion of the word dompter and the social nuances of pronunciation:


I really enjoyed this! For anyone who is fascinated by discussions of pronunciation, vocabulary, spelling, etc. as they relate to history, etymology, and class and other social factors, I recommend the fantastic though sadly discontinued podcast 'Parler comme jamais'. You can find it on any major podcast platform, and it's also on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLyCRmK8pIHdYtKC0JEIfZV92OhMoM_GTW

The host is easy to understand, and her rotating selection of guests offers a nice exposure to different voices. I was a low to medium B2 when I listened to it and had no real issues. I think my favourite episode was #28, 'À qui la faute?', on orthography and the complex role it plays in French society.
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Re: French listening and oral production

Postby Kraut » Sun Mar 24, 2024 12:16 pm

This is an analysis of the football friendly France-Germany on YouTube. The transcript is by riverside.ai, which offers larger spaces of text in its transcript, thus much easier to follow the content when reading. About 20 minutes and for free.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ZRYVd6ifAc
On a du boulot... (France 0-2 Allemagne)

https://riverside.fm/transcription
-------------------
There's a player, Lingo Player, that allows you to pause and continue the play by simply moving the mouse into the black field and out of it.
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Le Baron
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Re: French listening and oral production

Postby Le Baron » Wed May 01, 2024 8:18 pm

I just listened to an interesting podcast - Un élément clé et négligé de la justice : la traduction on France Culture about the problems of translation in legal settings and by extension policy between nations and diverse language areas. Where breakdowns in translation can be a cause of friction or injustice.

It interested me (enough to listen) because I remembered when I had legal bother here in NL I was infuriated by the use of the word 'fact' (feit) in place of 'claim' (noun) or assertion. At the time in the court I brought this up and insisted that 'fact' means something ascertained and not something waiting to be demonstrated.
However like in French, and actually in English, it is specific legal terminology for 'events' even if only presumed true.

There's a bit of discussion around Ai translations in a legal setting and the serious drawbacks when meaning is garbled. and also the general lack of resources given to what is a rather important part of presenting accurate information.
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Re: French listening and oral production

Postby DaveAgain » Wed Jul 03, 2024 4:42 pm

The French legislative election has introduced me to Éric Ciotti, he comes from Nice and has an unusual accent:

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Re: French listening and oral production

Postby Le Baron » Wed Jul 03, 2024 11:34 pm

It's not very unusual considering his origins. It's quite standardised in terms of pronunciation and not much like a southern accent at all. He also speaks more clearly in terms of enunciation than the interviewer. However, you probably listened to more of the interview than I did (around 5 minutes), what did you pinpoint as noteworthy?
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Re: French listening and oral production

Postby DaveAgain » Thu Jul 04, 2024 8:14 am

Le Baron wrote:However, you probably listened to more of the interview than I did (around 5 minutes), what did you pinpoint as noteworthy?
I just chose that interview as it was the most recent one. I tried to find some other examples of a Nice accent that sounded like him, and I couldn't.
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Re: French listening and oral production

Postby Le Baron » Thu Jul 04, 2024 2:18 pm

DaveAgain wrote:
Le Baron wrote:However, you probably listened to more of the interview than I did (around 5 minutes), what did you pinpoint as noteworthy?
I just chose that interview as it was the most recent one. I tried to find some other examples of a Nice accent that sounded like him, and I couldn't.

I'd never heard of him before so I looked him up. Another centre-right merchant. I listened to a podcast about a month ago about accents and there was a fellow from Nice on that who was saying he'd altered his accent when he got a media job up in Paris in the 1980s, but that after moving back down south and working for Sud Radio it gradually returned. That station's studios moved to Paris not long ago, but he has retained his accent.
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Re: French listening and oral production

Postby Kraut » Sun Jul 07, 2024 10:52 am

dictation exercices

https://www.dictaly.com/
Dictaly. Des dictées en ligne gratuites pour jouer avec l’orthographe
Dictaly est un site de passionnés. Des amoureux des textes et des mots qui vous proposent un site ludique pour travailler et vous aider à améliorer votre orthographe.

Il s’agit d’un site d’entraînement à l’orthographe qui propose des dizaines de dictées en ligne gratuites. Variété des exercices. Mises à jour régulières. Réalisation impeccable. Entièrement gratuit. Que demander de plus ? Suivez le guide.
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Kraut
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Re: French listening and oral production

Postby Kraut » Sun Jul 07, 2024 11:02 am

https://outilstice.com/2024/03/liste-me ... s-vacances
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Prends en de la graine donne la parole aux ados
Ma vie d’Ado, le podcast du magazine Okapi
Conseils pour une utilisation optimale des podcasts en classe
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Re: French listening and oral production

Postby Le Baron » Sun Jul 14, 2024 12:01 pm

In the direction of more complicated listening I'm dropping the suggestion here of France Culture's 'Les pieds sur terre' podcast. The good thing in these half hour programmes is that they speak to a lot of different people in ordinary circumstances. Such as in bars or their homes or at work. Not always in an interview capacity, so people relax and talk as they would in ordinary life, especially in groups. Of course this probably also makes it more complicated than more structured listening. Though for intermediate-on-the-way-to-advanced I think it likely provides a good source of ordinary speech input.

Often the people they talk to have regional accents and turns of speech. Here's the list of recent episodes:

https://www.radiofrance.fr/francecultur ... -terre?p=2
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To have talked much and read much is of more value in learning to speak and write well than to have parsed and analysed half a library.


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