Classical Languages - Study Group

An area with study groups for various languages. Group members help each other, share resources and experience. Study groups are permanent but the members rotate and change.
Bulbtismus
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Languages: English, Francais, Deutsch
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Re: Classical Languages - Study Group

Postby Bulbtismus » Wed Nov 16, 2022 3:22 pm

Does anybody study Hebrew? I would need some help at the start. I just can’t differentiate between Vav and Beth. Can someone take the time and fill out the names next to the letters? Thanks a ton.

ק
ר
א
ט
ו
ן
ם
פ
ש
ד
ג
כ
ע
י
ח
ל
ך
ף
ז
ס
ב
ה
נ
מ
צ
ת
ץ

I am also looking for free Ressources to start Greek.
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MorkTheFiddle
Black Belt - 1st Dan
Posts: 1835
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Languages: English (N). Read (only) French and Spanish. Studying Ancient Greek. Studying a bit of Latin. Once studied Old Norse. Dabbled in Catalan, Provençal and Italian.
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 11#p133911
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Re: Classical Languages - Study Group

Postby MorkTheFiddle » Wed Nov 16, 2022 6:19 pm

cito wrote:LingQ/LanguageCrush/Reading With Texts like website for Sanskrit Stories:

https://en.amarahasa.com/
Your post has languished without response or comment since September, but this is a very useful and interesting find. Thanks for posting.
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Many things which are false are transmitted from book to book, and gain credit in the world. -- attributed to Samuel Johnson

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księżycowy
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Location: Earth
Languages: Native: English
Novice: Japanese, German
(rusty: Polish, Irish, Mandarin, Taiwanese (spoken), Vietnamese, Lakota, Seneca (Onödowa'ga))

Learning: Biblical Hebrew, Biblical Greek, German

Language Levels Used: Novice -> Beginner -> Intermediate -> Advanced
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Re: Classical Languages - Study Group

Postby księżycowy » Thu Nov 17, 2022 10:33 am

Bulbtismus wrote:Does anybody study Hebrew? I would need some help at the start. I just can’t differentiate between Vav and Beth. Can someone take the time and fill out the names next to the letters? Thanks a ton.


Wow, really? Vav and Beth look quite different to me.

ק qamets
ר resh
א aleph
ט tet
ו vav
ן nun (final)
ם mem (final)
פ pe
ש shin
ד dalet
ג gamel
כ kof
ע ayin
י yod
ח het
ל lamed
ך kof (finał)
ף pe (final)
ז zayin
ס samekh
ב bet
ה hey
נ nun
מ mem
צ tsade
ת tav
ץ tsade (final)
(Excuse the spelling on a few, I did that fast and loose. I could also be misremembering a name or three.)

I am also looking for free Ressources to start Greek.

I'm afraid I don't know any good free resources, but if you have any cash to spend I can recommend a few resources.
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(Dead Log)
Elements of New Testament Greek (Duff) : 5 / 20
Basics of Biblical Greek (Mounce) : 7 / 36
(Biblical Hebrew - On Hold until the Spring Semester)

DaF Kompakt Neu A1- B1 (Klett) : 0 / 30

Bulbtismus
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Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2022 1:52 pm
Languages: English, Francais, Deutsch
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Re: Classical Languages - Study Group

Postby Bulbtismus » Thu Nov 17, 2022 11:29 am

@księżycowy Thanks a ton

Well, I don`t have any to spend yet, but if you like to share any ressources, I believe, a lot of people might be happy to better their Greek through them and I might come back to them as well. :D
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księżycowy
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Location: Earth
Languages: Native: English
Novice: Japanese, German
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Learning: Biblical Hebrew, Biblical Greek, German

Language Levels Used: Novice -> Beginner -> Intermediate -> Advanced
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Re: Classical Languages - Study Group

Postby księżycowy » Thu Nov 17, 2022 12:51 pm

Rather than reinvent the wheel, I'll repost my suggestions from another thread.

księżycowy wrote:I will suggest some Attic and Koine resources, if you don't mind. In two styles: emphasis on reading -or- emphasis on grammar (all are broadly of the translation style teaching)

For Attic I like:
  • Mastronarde's Introduction to Attic Greek for the more traditional translation method. It is very grammar heavy, and Mastronarde is not afraid to get into detail and I think he covers grammar well over all. Readings are slow to come, but some start getting added to the lessons towards the middle of the book, with more substantial readings shortly following after (though, not in every chapter). Mastronarde also has a website which has additional drills (some with sound), and additional readings for later in the text. Be warned that there are a lot of parsing exercises at the start.
  • Reading Greek by JACT for the more reading focused approach. This textbook gives you adapted Greek material to read from Part 1 Section A. The grammar introduced is usually based off what is found in the reading, rather than going through the parts of speech systematically, like Mastronarde does. It also has audio, if that's any boon. There is also a specific book An Independent Study Guide to Reading Greek by the same authors and publisher, meant to be used by independent learners, which is fantastic IMO. It's much more than just an answer key to the exercises! Oh, and the The World of Athens: An Introduction to Classical Athenian Culture, as a cultural & historical supplement. Certain parts of the text will direct you to parts in the history book. But this is outside of the New Testament and Early Church Fathers.

For Koine I like:
  • Basics of Biblical Greek by Mounce for the more traditional translation method. His style and treatment of Koine Greek is very similar to Mastronarde, with the main difference being the care he takes to explain the English concept and then relate it to the Greek concept. Mounce tends to have most exercises be either parsing or sentence translation, similar to Mastronarde. Mounce will also have readings at certain check points ("reviews") as well. I think this is my go to for beginning Koine Greek, really. Mounce also adds sentences from the Septuagint and other Greek sources relevant to the New Testament for translation, which is an oft overlooked issue in such textbooks. To get the full effect, get the workbook in addition to the textbook. Otherwise you won't have any exercises.
  • I have to admit that I have not really gotten around to using this text much yet (though I do want to take a run through it at some point, as it seems interesting to me), but I'm including it here as it's one of the few reading heavy textbooks that I think is probably one of the better ones. New Testament Greek: An Introduction by B. H. McLean. His textbook is similar in style (roughly speaking) to the JACT course in terms of how it goes through the grammar, and that reading is the primary focus. You'll be reading through the Gospel of John, and parsing things along the way.
Both Mounce and McLean will give you sentences with elements that have not been learned yet, but they always have an appropriate translation (usually in brackets) of the word or phrase so you can just worry about the grammar in focus and translate.

Of course, it goes without saying that these are my personal favorites. Others may not share my affection for some or all of these.
Last edited by księżycowy on Thu Nov 17, 2022 7:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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(Dead Log)
Elements of New Testament Greek (Duff) : 5 / 20
Basics of Biblical Greek (Mounce) : 7 / 36
(Biblical Hebrew - On Hold until the Spring Semester)

DaF Kompakt Neu A1- B1 (Klett) : 0 / 30

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MorkTheFiddle
Black Belt - 1st Dan
Posts: 1835
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 8:59 pm
Location: Southern Mississippi USA
Languages: English (N). Read (only) French and Spanish. Studying Ancient Greek. Studying a bit of Latin. Once studied Old Norse. Dabbled in Catalan, Provençal and Italian.
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 11#p133911
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Re: Classical Languages - Study Group

Postby MorkTheFiddle » Thu Nov 17, 2022 6:12 pm

księżycowy wrote:Rather than reinvent the wheel, I'll repost my suggestions from another thread.

księżycowy wrote:I will suggest some Attic and Koine resources, if you don't mind. In two styles: emphasis on reading -or- emphasis on grammar (all are broadly of the translation style teaching)

For Attic I like:
  • Mastronarde's Introduction to Attic Greek for the more traditional translation method. It is very grammar heavy, and Mastronarde is not afraid to get into detail and I think he covers grammar well over all. Readings are slow to come, but some start getting added to the lessons towards the middle of the book, with more substantial readings shortly following after (though, not in every chapter). Mastronarde also has a website which has additional drills (some with sound), and additional readings for later in the text. Be warned that there are a lot of parsing exercises at the start.
  • Reading Greek by JACT for the more reading focused approach. This textbook gives you adapted Greek material to read from Part 1 Section A. The grammar introduced is usually based off what is found in the reading, rather than going through the parts of speech systematically, like Mastronarde does. It also has audio, if that's any boon. There is also a specific book An Independent Study Guide to Reading Greek by the same authors and publisher, meant to be used by independent learners, which is fantastic IMO. It's much more than just an asnwer key to the exercises! Oh, and the The World of Athens: An Introduction to Classical Athenian Culture, as a cultural & historical supplement. Certain parts of the text will direct you to parts in the history book. But this is outside of the New Testament and Early Church Fathers.
Of course, it goes without saying that these are my personal favorites. Others may not share my affection for some or all of these.

Mastronarde is rich in content, but it has been pointed out that it may not work well for independent learners without an instructor. I keep a copy of it for reference.
Reading Greek was my introduction to Ancient Greek, and I recommend it, too.
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Many things which are false are transmitted from book to book, and gain credit in the world. -- attributed to Samuel Johnson

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księżycowy
Green Belt
Posts: 455
Joined: Fri Aug 25, 2017 3:26 pm
Location: Earth
Languages: Native: English
Novice: Japanese, German
(rusty: Polish, Irish, Mandarin, Taiwanese (spoken), Vietnamese, Lakota, Seneca (Onödowa'ga))

Learning: Biblical Hebrew, Biblical Greek, German

Language Levels Used: Novice -> Beginner -> Intermediate -> Advanced
x 979

Re: Classical Languages - Study Group

Postby księżycowy » Thu Nov 17, 2022 7:02 pm

MorkTheFiddle wrote:Mastronarde is rich in content, but it has been pointed out that it may not work well for independent learners without an instructor. I keep a copy of it for reference.
Reading Greek was my introduction to Ancient Greek, and I recommend it, too.

Is that due to the way he explains things? Or some other reason(s)? I'm curious.

Reading Greek is fantastic. I highly recommend it.
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(Dead Log)
Elements of New Testament Greek (Duff) : 5 / 20
Basics of Biblical Greek (Mounce) : 7 / 36
(Biblical Hebrew - On Hold until the Spring Semester)

DaF Kompakt Neu A1- B1 (Klett) : 0 / 30

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MorkTheFiddle
Black Belt - 1st Dan
Posts: 1835
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 8:59 pm
Location: Southern Mississippi USA
Languages: English (N). Read (only) French and Spanish. Studying Ancient Greek. Studying a bit of Latin. Once studied Old Norse. Dabbled in Catalan, Provençal and Italian.
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 11#p133911
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Re: Classical Languages - Study Group

Postby MorkTheFiddle » Fri Nov 18, 2022 6:37 pm

księżycowy wrote:
MorkTheFiddle wrote:Mastronarde is rich in content, but it has been pointed out that it may not work well for independent learners without an instructor. I keep a copy of it for reference.
Reading Greek was my introduction to Ancient Greek, and I recommend it, too.

Is that due to the way he explains things? Or some other reason(s)? I'm curious.

The book provides good explanations but it does not provide enough examples or exercises or reading.
Textkit has a useful thread about this topic: Mastronarde Group.
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Many things which are false are transmitted from book to book, and gain credit in the world. -- attributed to Samuel Johnson

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księżycowy
Green Belt
Posts: 455
Joined: Fri Aug 25, 2017 3:26 pm
Location: Earth
Languages: Native: English
Novice: Japanese, German
(rusty: Polish, Irish, Mandarin, Taiwanese (spoken), Vietnamese, Lakota, Seneca (Onödowa'ga))

Learning: Biblical Hebrew, Biblical Greek, German

Language Levels Used: Novice -> Beginner -> Intermediate -> Advanced
x 979

Re: Classical Languages - Study Group

Postby księżycowy » Fri Nov 18, 2022 9:01 pm

Thanks. I'll look through that thread. :)
0 x
(Dead Log)
Elements of New Testament Greek (Duff) : 5 / 20
Basics of Biblical Greek (Mounce) : 7 / 36
(Biblical Hebrew - On Hold until the Spring Semester)

DaF Kompakt Neu A1- B1 (Klett) : 0 / 30

User avatar
MorkTheFiddle
Black Belt - 1st Dan
Posts: 1835
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 8:59 pm
Location: Southern Mississippi USA
Languages: English (N). Read (only) French and Spanish. Studying Ancient Greek. Studying a bit of Latin. Once studied Old Norse. Dabbled in Catalan, Provençal and Italian.
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 11#p133911
x 4007

Re: Classical Languages - Study Group

Postby MorkTheFiddle » Sat Nov 26, 2022 1:25 pm

Three modern songs sung in Ancient Greek:

Hot N Cold in Ancient Greek (Θερμος δε Ψυχος)


Let It Go – Parody Music Video – in Ancient Greek


Mamma Mia in Ancient Greek
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Many things which are false are transmitted from book to book, and gain credit in the world. -- attributed to Samuel Johnson


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