German group

An area with study groups for various languages. Group members help each other, share resources and experience. Study groups are permanent but the members rotate and change.
User avatar
alexkelbo
Orange Belt
Posts: 160
Joined: Sun Apr 24, 2016 10:42 pm
Location: Germany
Languages: German (N), English (C1, CAE), Russian (A), Spanish (B), Mandarin (beginner)
x 195
Contact:

Re: German group

Postby alexkelbo » Mon May 03, 2021 1:17 pm

It's a little difficult but it took only a few seconds to get used to it.
0 x

Kraut
Brown Belt
Posts: 1261
Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2017 10:37 pm
Languages: German (N)
French (C)
English (C)
Spanish (A2)
Lithuanian
x 1584

Re: German group

Postby Kraut » Thu May 13, 2021 6:20 pm

https://www.daserste.de/live/live-de-102.html#

German Cup Final Dortmund-Leipzig now
0 x

Doitsujin
Green Belt
Posts: 260
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 6:21 pm
Languages: German (N)
x 474

Re: German group

Postby Doitsujin » Fri May 14, 2021 7:17 am

If you have at least B2 skills in German, you might find the following Berliner Zeitung article interesting:

Linguist Peter Eisenberg: „Die Genderfraktion verachtet die deutsche Sprache“

BTW, the studies that the interviewer refers to are most likely the studies carried out by Sapir-Whorf hypothesis proponents such as Lera Boroditsky.
A summary of their ideas can be found in the following Zeit article:

Die Macht der Worte
1 x

User avatar
tungemål
Blue Belt
Posts: 600
Joined: Sat Apr 06, 2019 3:56 pm
Location: Norway
Languages: Norwegian (N)
English, German, Spanish, Japanese, Dutch, Polish
x 1204

Re: German group

Postby tungemål » Fri May 14, 2021 8:52 am

Doitsujin wrote:If you have at least B2 skills in German, you might find the following Berliner Zeitung article interesting:

Linguist Peter Eisenberg: „Die Genderfraktion verachtet die deutsche Sprache“


I actually agree with him that words like "Student" should be considered gender neutral.
Meiner Meinung nach hat Norwegen eine bessere Lösung gefunden. Norwegisch nutzte auch Formen wie "Lehrerin" und "Schülerin" genauso wie in Deutsch, aber die wurden vor 40 Jarhren abgeschafft. Heutzutage sagt man nur "Lehrer" und das wird neutral aufgefasst. Man hat auch alle Berufsbezeichnungen, die "-mann" enthielten" (und es waren viele) mit einer geschlechtsneutralere ersetzt.

(corrections welcome)
Last edited by tungemål on Fri May 14, 2021 1:00 pm, edited 2 times in total.
1 x

Doitsujin
Green Belt
Posts: 260
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 6:21 pm
Languages: German (N)
x 474

Re: German group

Postby Doitsujin » Fri May 14, 2021 9:38 am

tungemål wrote:Meiner Meinung nach hat Norwegen eine bessere Lösung gefunden. Norwegisch nutzte auch Formen wie "Lehrerin" und "Schülerin" genauso wie in Deutsch, aber die wurden vor 40 Jarhre abgeschafft. Heutzutage sagt man nur "Lehrer" und das wird neutral aufgefasst. Man hat auch alle Berufsbezeichnungen, die "-mann" enthielten" (und es waren viele) mit eine geschlechtsneutralere ersetzt.
Ich finde diese Lösung wesentlich besser als die derzeitigen Varianten mit Sternchen und Doppelpunkten. Ich hätte auch kein Problem damit, wenn im offiziellen Sprachgebrauch zukünftig die femininen Singular- und Pluralformen als geschlechtsneutrale Formen verwendet würden.
Die Universität Leipzig hat das schon vor Jahren gemacht, allerdings nur in einem Dokument, der Grundordnung [= the by-law].

Sprachreform an der Uni Leipzig: "Wir waren nüchtern"
1 x

User avatar
Iversen
Black Belt - 3rd Dan
Posts: 3258
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:36 pm
Location: Denmark
Languages: Monolingual travels in Danish, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Romanian and (part time) Esperanto
Ahem, not yet: Norwegian, Afrikaans, Platt, Scots, Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Albanian, Greek, Latin, Irish, Indonesian and a few more...
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1027
x 8132

Re: German group

Postby Iversen » Fri May 14, 2021 9:42 am

Danish has basically done the same as Norwegian, but apparently less consistently. For instance a "landmand" (farmer) doesn't have to be a man, but the word itself contains the name for a certain gender. Some female "formænd" have demanded to be called "forkvinde", while others se the solution in simply accepting the word "formand" as a gender neutral name - which looks odd, but may function as the number of female something-mænd grows. To my eyes it would however be better to find totally gender neutral names, which in practice means using the male term for everybody) - but this has not always been prossible. Especially in some artsy professions where gender does play a role the old titles on "-inde" still are used, but now with the male title used for both genders if you speak salary and the two different forms when it comes to a specific role. For instance you see both "sanger" and "sangerinde" about female singers (at least in classical choirs) and "danser" and "danserinde" about dancers - maybe because they still are employed as either male or female performers. But I look forward to the day where at least the postfix -inde is scrapped everywhere.

Another complication has been eliminated: in the bad old days an "oberstinde" wouldn't be a female "oberst" (colonel), but the wife of a colonel. And there simply weren't any female coronels at the time so the meaning was clear. Ditto for other highranking professions like mayors and professors. Luckily that dubious practice has ceased, and women can take up a job in the armed forces so now an "oberst" actually could be a woman.

The process can also in a few cases go to other way: in the old days a "sygeplejerske" (nurse) would always be a female and a "sygeplejer" always was a man, but their functions and educations were different. Since 1991 the job function "sygeplejer" has been abolished, and even before that a certain number of men had become "sygeplejersker" - and nowadays no male nurse frowns at being called "sygeplejerske" (if it weren't for the salary, which has remained fairly low since the days were it was a typical female job).

And then there is the special case of the late Henri Marie Jean André de Laborde de Monpezat, who married our crown princess Margrethe in 1967 and promptly was dubbbed "prins Henrik". When she become ruling queen in 1972 his title became "prinsgemal", maybe under inspiration from the English court, and when he later quibbed that it would have been more logical to call him "king" he was mercilessly ridiculed by the usual gang of not-too-smart court correspondents from that lowly section of the printed press which to this day is called "dameblade" (ladies' magazines). But of course he was right: if you can accept that a queen can be ruling queen, then it is against all logic to exclude the possibility that a king might be non-ruling. The simple solution to this could be to use the gender neutral denomination "majestæt" instead, but I think that the words king and queen are too deeply entrenched for that to happen (like "prins" and "prinsesse"). And there will only be kings for at least the next two generations so the question will not arise again soon. However our "statsminister" (Mette Frederiksen) is never ever called anything that might allude to the fact that she is female, and I think she would be fulminating if somebody called her *statsministerinde.

But the Germans have followed another path, so be it, which implies that all female professions are specifically marked as female, and the consequence of this decision is that any group containing a mixture of genders is called by the male denomination, which of course is a discriminatory practice, even when defended by staunchly conservative linguists.

GER: übrigens habe ich auch den Vater des Bierbrauer von Tungemål verstanden, nur nicht das Wort "süffig" - vielleicht weil ich zu wenig Bier in Bayern getrunken habe (und gar kein Wein).
1 x

Doitsujin
Green Belt
Posts: 260
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 6:21 pm
Languages: German (N)
x 474

Re: German group

Postby Doitsujin » Fri May 14, 2021 10:00 am

Iversen wrote:But the Germans have followed another path, which implies that all female professions are specifically marked as female, and the consequence of this decision is that any group containing a mixture of genders is called by the male denomination, which of course is a discriminatory practice, even when defended by staunchly conservative linguists.
According to some surveys, many women are actually against using asterisks for marking gender-neutral terms.
Mehrheit der Frauen will keine Gendersternchen

@Iversen und @tungemål: gab es in euren Ländern größere Widerstände gegen diese Änderungen oder sind Skandinavier einfach vernünftiger oder pragmatischer als Deutsche?

@Iversen, da dies ein Forum zum Deutschlernen ist, könntest Du bitte auf Deutsch antworten?
0 x

User avatar
Iversen
Black Belt - 3rd Dan
Posts: 3258
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:36 pm
Location: Denmark
Languages: Monolingual travels in Danish, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Romanian and (part time) Esperanto
Ahem, not yet: Norwegian, Afrikaans, Platt, Scots, Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Albanian, Greek, Latin, Irish, Indonesian and a few more...
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1027
x 8132

Re: German group

Postby Iversen » Fri May 14, 2021 10:07 am

Doitsujin wrote:@Iversen, da dies ein Forum zum Deutschlernen ist, könntest Du bitte auf Deutsch antworten?


Gern, aber es wird einige Minuten dauern wiedermals so viel Text zu produzieren.



* * '
Gut, ans Arbeit! Die Dänen haben grundsätzlich dasselbe als die Norweger getan, nämlich Professionsbezeichnungen soweit möglich Geschlechtsneutral zu gestalten, aber wir haben dabei die alten Professionsbezeichnungen auf "-mann" beibehalten, obwohl das Wort für ein gewisses Geschlecht unbestreitbar drinne eingehalten sei. So eine Frau kann in Dänemark problemlos als "landmand" (Bauer) gelten, und niemand findet das merkwürdig. Das wort "Bonde" wäre als Alternativ möglich, aber es hat einen etwas altmodischen Ton an sich- was einige natürlich als Vorteil sehen (Öko-Bauer). Einige weibliche "formænd" (Vorsitzenderinnen) haben gefordert, immer als "forkvinde" genannt zu werden, während andere die Lösung darin sehen, das Wort "formand" einfach als geschlechtsneutralen Namen zu benutzen, bis allen sich daran gewöhnt haben und niemand sich mehr an der Etymologie kümmert. Fehlt nur, daß die Frauen auch das Wort "Mann" okkupieren - wie man mit das unbestimmte Pronomen "man" bereits getan hat (wie die Deutschen übrigens).

Nur vereinzelt ist die Bewegung in die entgegengesetzten Richtung gegangen, wie z.B. mit die "sygeplejersker" (Krankenschwester), die jetzt auch männlich sein können (Krankenbrüder ??). Es gab bis 1991 auch "sygeplejere" (immer männlich), aber das war eine andere Profession mit andere Aufgaben und einem anderen Ausbildungsverlauf.

Es gibt immer noch "danserinder" und "sangerinder", aber meistens wo es um bestimmte Rollen geht - sie sehen immerhin nicht gleich aus und haben auch Stimmen, die generell nicht gleich hoch sind. Die Schauspieler sind hier ein bissel weiter gekommen, obwohl es auch hier etwas überraschend wäre,ein Mann als Julie und eine Frau as Romeo zu sehen - und gerade deshalb ist es vermutlich schon auf irgendwelche Szene irgendwo vorgekommen. Aber es wird immer mehr nur "dansere" und "sangere" und "skuespillere" gesagt, wenn es um ihren Beruf geht. Personlich möchte ich, daß nur mit Geschlechtsneutralen bezeichnungen operiert würde, und die Entwicklung geht in dieser Richtung. Außer im Königshaus, wo es immer noch mit "konger" und "dronninger" und "prinser" und "prinsesser" operiert wird, und ein König plus eine Königin wird immer als "kongepar" bezeichnet, auch heute wo unser Majestät eine hoch geehrte Frau namens Margrethe ist. Es wird auch immer vom "kongerige" (Königsreich) gesprochen, wobei die Logik eher "Dronningerige" und "dronningehus" bieten würde.

Unsere Margrethe hat in 1967 den Graf Henri Marie Jean André de Laborde de Monpezat geheiratet, der prompt als "Prins Henrik" umbenannt wurde (die Dänen könnten sein Name ganz einfach nicht aussprechen). Als sie 1972 regierende Königin wurde, wurde des Mannes Titel "prinsgemal", vielleicht unter Inspiration des englischen Hofes, und als er später äusserte, daß es logischer gewesen wäre, ihn als König zu bezeichnen, wurde er von der üblichen Bande Journalisten gnadenlos verspottet. Aber natürlich hatte er Recht: Wenn eine Königin regierender Königin sein kann, sollte es für anständige Mennschen kein Problem sein, ihren Ehemann als nicht-regierenden König anzuerkennen. Aber die betroffenden Journalisten konnten sich offenbar nicht von dem Vorurteil befreien, daß Könige notwendigerweise immer regierende Monarken seien, und nur unsere Verfassung von 1953 zwang sie dazu, widerwillig regierende Königinnen zu anerkennen. Aber nach Margrethe wird es ein König Frederik und danach sein sohn König Christian geben, so die widerlichen alte Sitten können dann unbehelligt jahrzehntelang weiterleben.

Übrigens ist diejenige, die in Dänemark zurzeit wirklich regiert, eine Frau, nämlich unser 'statsminister' Mette Frederiksen, und sie würde es als eine grobe Beleidigung aufnehmen und wütend werden, wenn jemand ihr als 'statsministerinde' bezeichnen würde. Und niemand hier im Mettemark möchte das erleben ... :shock: :( :roll:

..zufrieden?
2 x

User avatar
tungemål
Blue Belt
Posts: 600
Joined: Sat Apr 06, 2019 3:56 pm
Location: Norway
Languages: Norwegian (N)
English, German, Spanish, Japanese, Dutch, Polish
x 1204

Re: German group

Postby tungemål » Fri May 14, 2021 1:04 pm

Doitsujin wrote:@Iversen und @tungemål: gab es in euren Ländern größere Widerstände gegen diese Änderungen oder sind Skandinavier einfach vernünftiger oder pragmatischer als Deutsche?


Eine gute Frage, aber das weiss ich nicht. Es ist schon lange her.
1 x

User avatar
tiia
Blue Belt
Posts: 560
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2016 11:52 pm
Location: Finland
Languages: German (N), English (?), Finnish (~B2), Spanish (B1), Swedish (A2?)
Language Log: viewtopic.php?t=2374
x 1020

Re: German group

Postby tiia » Sat May 15, 2021 10:22 am

Iversen wrote:Fehlt nur, daß die Weiber auch das Wort "Mann" okkupieren - wie man mit das unbestimmte Pronomen "man" bereits getan hat (wie die Deutschen übrigens).


Ich bin mir jetzt nicht sicher, ob dir das bewusst ist, aber das Wort "Weib" gibt diesem Satz einen sehr negativen Unterton. Selbst der Duden warnt davor, dass dieses Wort heutzutage als diskriminierend aufgefasst werden kann.
Wenn dieser Satz von einem Muttersprachler gefallen wäre, würde ich ihn auch zunächst als diskriminierend auffassen.

In speziellen Phrasen oder auch bei Bezug aufs Mittelalter/frühere Zeiten, ist das Wort in Ordnung. In einem Text, der sich aber auf die jetzige Zeit bezieht, ist es das aber normalerweise nicht.
Ich vermute, dass der Satz auch ein wenig humorvoll gemeint sein könnte. Mit dem Wort "Frauen" würde man den selben Effekt erziehlen, nur ohne diesen diskriminierenden Unterton.
2 x
Corrections for entries written in Finnish, Spanish or Swedish are welcome.
Project 30+X: 22 / 30


Return to “Study Groups”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest