Le groupe français 2016 - 2019 Les Voyageurs

An area with study groups for various languages. Group members help each other, share resources and experience. Study groups are permanent but the members rotate and change.
User avatar
Klara
White Belt
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Aug 27, 2018 10:28 am
Languages: German (N), English (C1), Danish (adv.), Spanish (interm.), French (A2), Russian (beginner)
x 111

Re: Le groupe français 2016 - 2019 Les Voyageurs

Postby Klara » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:35 am

C'est la rentrée littéraire en France ! De ce fait, j'ai acheté mon premier roman français.

After I had watched the video "Le roman, une passion française" on TV5 Monde, I thought why not start with a French novel right now?

RentreeLitteraire.PNG
RentreeLitteraire.PNG (28.36 KiB) Viewed 277 times
2 x

Speakeasy
Black Belt - 1st Dan
Posts: 1985
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2015 5:19 pm
Location: Canada (Montréal region)
Languages: English (N), French (C2). Studying: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Polish, and Russian; all with widely varying degrees of application, enthusiasm, and success.
x 5327

Re: Le groupe français 2016 - 2019 Les Voyageurs

Postby Speakeasy » Wed Sep 11, 2019 11:24 am

Klara wrote:C'est la rentrée littéraire en France ! ...
Just a bit of clarification for those students of French who might not be familiar with the term "la rentrée": this refers to the "start of the new school year" which, as we all know, is a period filled with a great deal of emotion and activity, not to mention substantial expenditures by students, parents, and many others.

It has become something of a tradition, at least in France and Québec, for commercial and other establishments to announce their own "rentrées" to capitalize on the wide-spread excitement and the generalized tendency to disburse funds without much caution. Some sectors of the economy time the release of new products/services with this period (such as the publishing industry, but they're far from alone).

Accordingly, the "rentrée littéraire" has more to do with generating sales revenues than it does with French literature. By the way, I see no absolutely harm in this use of the term in this manner, particularly as it is established practice. Nonetheless, seeing it here in the language forum, I thought that some members might appreciate a bit of clarification. Aux études! ;)

EDITED:
Erreurs de frappe, comme toujours!
Puis, encore d'autres!
Last edited by Speakeasy on Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:50 pm, edited 2 times in total.
4 x

User avatar
Klara
White Belt
Posts: 28
Joined: Mon Aug 27, 2018 10:28 am
Languages: German (N), English (C1), Danish (adv.), Spanish (interm.), French (A2), Russian (beginner)
x 111

Re: Le groupe français 2016 - 2019 Les Voyageurs

Postby Klara » Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:56 pm

Thanks for the clarification, Speakeasy! And it is of course a marketing thing ;) , also according to the text:

Pour certaines maisons d'édition, environ 50% du chiffre d'affaires peut être réalisé dès l'automne. Cette rentrée littéraire est une tradition bien française. Les prix qui l'accompagnent aussi.

In Germany, we have the yearly book faires in Frankfurt and Leipzig. Those two events are like the rentrée littéraire in France. By the way, the word rentrée could be translated into German as Saisonbeginn, Start der Saison.
3 x

User avatar
joecleland
White Belt
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2019 3:09 am
Location: Saint Petersburg, FL
Languages: English (N), French (A1)
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 18#p147718
x 40

Re: Le groupe français 2016 - 2019 Les Voyageurs

Postby joecleland » Wed Sep 11, 2019 7:55 pm

Sarafina wrote:I think I've already posted links for some of the shows listed before. But this is just a bunch of links to cartoons that are available for free on YouTube and are in French.

Arthur (12 episodes and French subtitles are available)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byDzuHo ... JDB4G94aSj
Mes parrains sont magiques (13 episodes)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20E_1An ... vsG2sxLdmL
Magic La Famille (21 episodes),
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pciWnFg ... _sBC1n-7q7
Le Monde selon Kevin (24 episodes but half of it is blocked in my location),
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4R94vFu ... sk&index=5
TIMOTHÉE VA À L'ÉCOLE (25 episodes and French subtitles are available),
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vsJJEV- ... Yf4WrWoJ80
D'Artagnan et les Trois Mousquetaires (26 episodes),
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0p0t3g9 ... 968861B864
Bouba le petit oursan (26 episodes),
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLRUDwH ... czBD6lP5ha
Ed Edd Eddy (29 episodes),
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fh0SsRz ... FseqSZZHrV
Tib et Tatoum (29 episodes and French subtitles are available),
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7o_Cojz ... AxTQ-QIXO9
Les jumelles de St-Clare (33)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h8diJ06 ... BSs9KiE5tS
Petite Bonne Femme (40),
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apgYwtP ... qDMsUDSDks
Tico et Ses Amis
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVzC0_U ... 9dsKDcdk8a
Il était une fois (41),
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m0pUKsM ... 0879116BAB
Sindbad (42)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPqyT2s ... GCTIZyvbOI
Le Petit Lord (43)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wCgZcc1 ... QM4-aBKd8K
Princesse Sarah (47 episodes),
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBRUsyI ... hN3w5nxXf4
Raconte-moi une histoire (47)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MxgD1v ... Ugx0GKs9QA
Vanessa et la magie des rêves
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23tcFkz ... CgBNopQ4_K
Les 4 filles du Dr March (48)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gz_74c5 ... dArOMJuWI7
Karine l'aventure du Nouveau Monde (50)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMCa7Ve ... 9WDy8GznbY
Pollyanna
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKyyCkh ... Nzicb_y-h-
Heidi fille des Alpes (52 episodes),
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_eNEHUV ... 230c2M_dCY
Les Jumeaux du bout du monde (52)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrmVx0C ... -JFm7z968o
Totally Spies (52 in total)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=inKCn1N ... fT6GGmWxG1 (Season 1)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VKPvR3 ... TnZKkOFUFu (Season 2)
Mew Mew Powers (53)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nMlcMU ... MegrF7-02l
Gigi (63 episodes)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E9b9BP- ... OwA6eQXZYZ
Maya l'abeille (104)
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... yoCGl_QN9Y

A playlist that has random clips of Caillou but they also have French subtitles availabe. I found them to have really helpful if you are at the A1/A2 stages
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXv6RgJ ... qjSGv_ojmb
This channel has various clips of children TV shows (mainly Caillou and Le Petit Nicholas) with French subtitles
https://www.youtube.com/user/buenovelazquez/videos


This is gold! Thank you for this!
4 x

    Complete
  • Pimsleur French Level 1 - 30/30 Lessons

    Currently Using
  • Assimil French with Ease - 36/113 Lessons (32%)
  • The Most Awesome Word List You Have Ever Seen - 300/625 Words (48%)

    Thinking about using
  • Glossika
  • Assimil Using French

User avatar
MorkTheFiddle
Blue Belt
Posts: 896
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 8:59 pm
Location: usa
Languages: English (N). Read (only) French and Spanish. Studying Ancient Greek, aiming for mastery by 2424. Studying a bit of Latin and Japanese. Once studied Old Norse. Dabbled in Catalan, Provençal and Italian.
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 11#p133911
x 1425

Re: Le groupe français 2016 - 2019 Les Voyageurs

Postby MorkTheFiddle » Wed Sep 11, 2019 11:40 pm

Les Belles Lettres have just published Journal de guerre (1939-1945) by Evelyn Waugh, translated by Julia Malye.
In addition there is a trilogy Sword of Honour, avec Hommes en armes, Officiers et Gentlemen et La Capitulation.. It isn't clear whether Les Belles Lettres carries them nor whether Malye translated them. FWIW.
2 x
Tu sabes cuando sales pero no sabes cuando regresas.

DaveAgain
Green Belt
Posts: 429
Joined: Mon Aug 27, 2018 11:26 am
Languages: English (native), French (intermediate), German (beginner).
x 690

Re: Le groupe français 2016 - 2019 Les Voyageurs

Postby DaveAgain » Thu Sep 12, 2019 9:24 am

Just come across a new-to-me word that seems an important one:

baragouiner > speak badly, speak pidgin. :-)

https://www.wordreference.com/fren/baragouiner

.. là j'ai commencé un petit peu à baragouiner vraiment c'est ça il y a des trucs qui était clair, qui était correct mais j'ai beaucoup de trucs un peu des trucs un peu j'ai bidouillé. Je chantais des phrases avec quoi
quote from YouTube video Mon Parcours Linguistique.
2 x

Arnaud
Blue Belt
Posts: 894
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 11:57 am
Location: France
Languages: French (N), Russian (int)
Language Log: viewtopic.php?t=1524
x 1917

Re: Le groupe français 2016 - 2019 Les Voyageurs

Postby Arnaud » Thu Sep 12, 2019 3:19 pm

DaveAgain wrote:Just come across a new-to-me word that seems an important one:

baragouiner > speak badly, speak pidgin. :-)

https://www.wordreference.com/fren/baragouiner

And from which language come the words bara and gwin ? ;)
3 x

Speakeasy
Black Belt - 1st Dan
Posts: 1985
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2015 5:19 pm
Location: Canada (Montréal region)
Languages: English (N), French (C2). Studying: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Polish, and Russian; all with widely varying degrees of application, enthusiasm, and success.
x 5327

Re: Le groupe français 2016 - 2019 Les Voyageurs

Postby Speakeasy » Thu Sep 12, 2019 6:02 pm

DaveAgain wrote:Just come across a new-to-me word that seems an important one: baragouiner > speak badly, speak pidgin. https://www.wordreference.com/fren/baragouiner
Arnaud wrote:And from which language come the words bara and gwin?
La légende populaire est certainement née d’une coïncidence linguistique au lendemain de la guerre de 1870. A cette époque, les parlers de France se rencontraient… et ne se comprenaient pas toujours ! On a ainsi affirmé que « baragouin » viendrait du breton « bara », pain et « gouin »/ « gwin », vin ; ce que les soldats bretons auraient réclamé souvent sans se faire comprendre, rendant le terme synonyme de « parler indistinctement, d’une manière incompréhensible ». Une note de M. Roulin au Littré évoque également une autre hypothèse proche : « Composé, non de « bara », pain, et « guin », vin, mais de « bara », pain, et « gwenn », blanc, les miliciens de la Basse-Bretagne, qui arrivaient à Rennes ou à Laval, et qui étaient logés et nourris chez les bourgeois, témoignant leur surprise et leur satisfaction à la vue du pain blanc et répétant « bara gwenn ».
Source: Les Lyriades de la langue française
http://www.leslyriades.fr/spip.php?article605&var_recherche=baragouiner
10 points à DaveAgain pour avoir suggéré le mot.
10 points à Arnaud pour avoir posé la question piège.
10 points à Speakeasy pour avoir trouvé la réponse.
Last edited by Speakeasy on Fri Sep 13, 2019 4:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
5 x

User avatar
Cèid Donn
Green Belt
Posts: 282
Joined: Thu Nov 15, 2018 10:48 pm
Languages: native: eng-US; adv: gaelic. french; adv-int: irish, breton, german, spanish; int: welsh, indonesian, swedish; 6WC: russian; beg/dabbling: japanese, navajo, hawaiian, manx, yoruba, faroese. italian; eventually: darija; long ago: latin, biblical hebrew, ancient greek
x 824

Re: Le groupe français 2016 - 2019 Les Voyageurs

Postby Cèid Donn » Fri Sep 13, 2019 3:34 am

That sounds like as much nonsense as the popular story about the origin of "kangaroo." This word is much, much older than the 1900s, dating some 500 years earlier, so its real origin is likely lost to history. But that it stems from Breton words seems largely uncontested.
0 x
French SC: Films : 117 / 100 Books : 103 / 100
Gaelic SC: Films : 81 / 100 Books : 55 / 100
Spanish SC: Films : 61 / 100 Books : 22 / 100

Speakeasy
Black Belt - 1st Dan
Posts: 1985
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2015 5:19 pm
Location: Canada (Montréal region)
Languages: English (N), French (C2). Studying: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Polish, and Russian; all with widely varying degrees of application, enthusiasm, and success.
x 5327

Re: Le groupe français 2016 - 2019 Les Voyageurs

Postby Speakeasy » Fri Sep 13, 2019 4:01 am

Cèid Donn wrote:That sounds like as much nonsense as the popular story about the origin of "kangaroo." This word is much, much older than the 1900s, dating some 500 years earlier, so its real origin is likely lost to history. But that it stems from Breton words seems largely uncontested.
Well, you're right! So was Serpent when she commented that no one clicks on the links and, even when they do, they don't read the articles...

Les Lyriades de la langue française
http://www.leslyriades.fr/spip.php?article605&var_recherche=baragouiner

La légende populaire est certainement née d’une coïncidence linguistique au lendemain de la guerre de 1870. A cette époque, les parlers de France se rencontraient… et ne se comprenaient pas toujours ! On a ainsi affirmé que « baragouin » viendrait du breton « bara », pain et « gouin »/ « gwin », vin ; ce que les soldats bretons auraient réclamé souvent sans se faire comprendre, rendant le terme synonyme de « parler indistinctement, d’une manière incompréhensible ». Une note de M. Roulin au Littré évoque également une autre hypothèse proche : « Composé, non de « bara », pain, et « guin », vin, mais de « bara », pain, et « gwenn », blanc, les miliciens de la Basse-Bretagne, qui arrivaient à Rennes ou à Laval, et qui étaient logés et nourris chez les bourgeois, témoignant leur surprise et leur satisfaction à la vue du pain blanc et répétant « bara gwenn ».

N’y aurait-il pas une pointe de mépris dans cette étymologie un peu facile ? Le terme est en fait plus ancien : en 1580, Montaigne l’utilise dans Les Essais (Livre II), non sans dérision, évoquant un « livre basty d’un espagnol baragouiné en terminaisons latines ». Et même avant lui Rabelais faisait affirmer à Pantagruel au chapitre 9 de l’œuvre éponyme « Mon amy, ie n’entens poinct ce barragouin ». Remontons enfin le cours de l’Histoire de la langue de quelques siècles pour trouver la forme attestée de « barragouyn » chez Du Cange en 1391 (« Beaux seigneurs, je ne suis point Barragouyn : mais aussi bon chrestian ») alors synonyme de « sauvage », « grossier » ou « barbare ».

Ainsi l’histoire étonnante du mot a une origine bien plus lointaine mais toute aussi orgueilleuse : si l’on convient que le mot provient du latin « barbarus » emprunté lui-même au grec « β α ́ ρ ϐ α ρ ο ς » (dont le bégaiement interne habille le mot de ridicule), il signifie donc à l’origine « étranger », c’est à dire « n’étant pas grec » et, par extension, « non-civilisé » !

Nous pouvons achever cette petite recherche étymologique sur une autre coïncidence aux allures de vengeance : en effet en breton, « baragouiner » se dit « GREGACHat, -iñ » et signifie littéralement « parler grec »…
:mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
3 x


Return to “Study Groups”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest