Dutch Golden Age paintings and painters (for Dutch learners)

This is a room for the discussion of travel plans or experiences and the culture of places you have visited or plan to visit.
User avatar
tommus
Blue Belt
Posts: 808
Joined: Sat Jul 04, 2015 3:59 pm
Location: Kingston, ON, Canada
Languages: English (N), French (B2), Dutch (B2)
x 1448

Re: Dutch Golden Age paintings and painters (for Dutch learners)

Postby tommus » Fri Aug 09, 2019 4:05 pm

How did Rembrandt's language sound?

Hoe klonk de taal van Rembrandt?

For the 350th anniversary of Rembrandt's death, researchers developed a series of Rembrandt Tutorials where Rembrandt "himself" teaches how to paint. These Tutorials are on YouTube. To be realistic, they used the Dutch language as spoken in the 15th century, and even reconstructed, as best they could, how Rembrandt's actual voice would probably have sounded.

The story of the preparation of these tutorials also contains links to the Tutorials themselves.

Rembrandt Tutorials
3 x
Dutch: 01 September -> 31 December 2020
Watch 1000 Dutch TV Series Videos : 6 / 1000

Nogon
Yellow Belt
Posts: 64
Joined: Sat May 13, 2017 6:21 pm
Languages: German (N), Swedish (C), English (?), French (A1), Esperanto (A1). Reading Danish, Norwegian, Dutch, Afrikaans. Learning Polish, Yiddish, Greek
x 146

Re: Dutch Golden Age paintings and painters (for Dutch learners)

Postby Nogon » Fri Aug 09, 2019 5:35 pm

Wow! That is utterly fascinating! Thanks for telling us about it, tommus!

I'm extra happy about, that I not only could read the article with quite good understanding, but even get the gist of the "De ‘making-of’ van de Rembrandt Tutorials" without reading the subtitles - without ever having learnt any Dutch. (Except a little Clozemaster for a few weeks.) German as a native language makes Dutch almost (but not entirely) transparent. I think, I could acquire an okay reading ability without too much work. Should buy a dictionary and a beginners' grammar and check the library for some nice Dutch books.
0 x
2020
: 1281 / 2000 Pages read in Afrikaans
: 1278 / 2000 Pages read in Dutch
: 617 / 1000 Pages read in Esperanto
: 4595 / 5000 Pages read in French

SC 2020/2021
: 55 / 100 Books
: 26 / 100 Films

User avatar
tommus
Blue Belt
Posts: 808
Joined: Sat Jul 04, 2015 3:59 pm
Location: Kingston, ON, Canada
Languages: English (N), French (B2), Dutch (B2)
x 1448

Re: Dutch Golden Age paintings and painters (for Dutch learners)

Postby tommus » Sat May 16, 2020 11:45 am

The Night Watch: Rijksmuseum's high tech photo

Here is a BBC article and a link to a new technology to display Rembrandt's The Night Watch (De Nachtwacht) in amazing detail (hyper-resolution). It is as if you were standing in front of the painting with a magnifying glass.

BBC article

Direct link to Nachtwacht

Dutch Wikipedia article about De Nachtwacht
1 x
Dutch: 01 September -> 31 December 2020
Watch 1000 Dutch TV Series Videos : 6 / 1000

User avatar
Iversen
Black Belt - 2nd Dan
Posts: 2883
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:36 pm
Location: Denmark
Languages: Monolingual travels in Danish, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Romanian and (part time) Esperanto
Ahem, not yet: Norwegian, Afrikaans, Platt, Scots, Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Albanian, Greek, Latin, Irish, Indonesian and a few more...
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1027
x 6541

Re: Dutch Golden Age paintings and painters (for Dutch learners)

Postby Iversen » Sat May 16, 2020 2:45 pm

Thanks for publishing the link to the reconstruction of the speech of mynheer Rembrandt van Rijn. It is actually hard to find genuine texts from his era even though it was one of the most glorious golden ages any country has been able to muster so hearing a reconstructed voice from that time was even more unexpected. I was however surprised that the short speech à la 'Rembrandt* wasn't more oldfashioned (and guttural), and that it was so easy to understand it. But I was also slightly surprised at the voice itself. Maybe it should illustrate Rembrandt's voice from a late period in his life and maybe his teeth weren't quite as complete then as in his younger days, but the voice I heard suggested that he had a lisp and also that he may have had a tendency to spit and wiggle his upper lip when talking, and he may have sounded differently in his younger years. But now that the methodology has been developed it may be used on other famous persons from the time, including young Rembrandt.

Btw: Long ago I got my Dutch listening breakthrough (epiphany) by listening for five hours to AVRO Museum TV in Dutch (the site still exists, but has changed a lot). This time the fun was over after just a few minutes, but I noticed and bookmarked the link to Nemo Kennislink near the bottom of the page, and then I can listen some more to small scientific lectures in Dutch.
1 x


Return to “Travel and Culture”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest