The 2019 365 Day Language Challenge

Ongoing language-learning challenges, and team challenge logs (but not individual logs)
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PeterMollenburg
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The 2019 365 Day Language Challenge

Postby PeterMollenburg » Thu Dec 27, 2018 11:35 pm

The following in parts is copied from my log and pasted here (please reply here):

I've had an idea for a new challenge... (edit: I've not been alone in this idea, nor the first)

Perhaps it's been done before, or a variation of it. There was something on HTLAL along the lines of a consistency challenge or whatever.

A "365 day challenge"

The main goal: Study your chosen language(s) for at least 30 minutes a day for every single day of the year.

Over the years of language study the one thing that seems most important in language learning is remaining consistent. I've never been perfect, and I'd like to aim for a perfect year. A year without missing day I think would see vast improvements to one's chosen language(s), as I think a lot is lost when momentum wanes or comes to a grinding halt. Thus, it's become soooooo absolutely important that if you want to progress and progress well, you must NOT skip days, must NOT make exceptions, you MUST study every single day! Hate late nights? Hate the idea that there will be special days like Christmas in which you won't have time? Well, actually the idea is, no, there are no excuses, you must find the time.

Perhaps I could have a kind of log, but it would be a group one, if others were willing to join in on such a challenge. If the response is bigger than anticipated, then it wouldn't be my log, it would be a shared challenge. Well, these are just some thoughts I've had of late.

If you had not studied by midnight, that's okay, as long as you study before sleep would be the rule. If you nap 30 min after midnight but then suddenly wake to do your study, that would be okay, provided your longest period of sleep came after your study session.

Study would have to be discussed/defined more clearly as it would potentially be open to much debate.

Perhaps one could join with several languages, but have an order of priority so that if you come to a day in which you simply cannot make it through all your languages, failing the challenge in less important languages while surviving for the remaining important one(s), wouldn't be the end of the world.

Whoever makes it the furtherest through the year, wins. If there were more than one who made the entire year, then it might come down to either granting several winners of equal standing, or granting an overall winner based on who had studied the most by the end in terms of languages, hours, or everything combined.

If people express interest in such a challenge, I may post this in a separate thread, if not, it could fizz away into nothing, or I may even attempt it just by my lonesome.

Get a foot on, or two,
who am I even?
PM

Sarafina wrote:That's a really good challenge. I really like it. I definitely need something like that for 2019.


Cool, okay, based on the overwhelming response (and I've given this like, what, half an hour)... okay, joking of course (not about the half an hour).... either way i've decided to post this as a new thread as there are only limited days left in the year.

Given it's very late in the game and some people may want to join later, I think the official start date should be 1st Jan 2019, but for those who come late to the party allow for an extension perhaps, which sees them finish later as well.

Probably about the only exception I can think of is if you are changing time zones and lose a day. In such circumstances, I'd be inclined to recommend either doing 2 days worth of study while in transit (most likely flying, really), or to add a day to when you were due to finish the challenge. So, if you started originally on Jan 1st 2019, you'd not finish on 31st Dec 2019, but your last day of study would be 1st Jan 2020.

Edit:
I’m not alone in this idea for a challenge, so I don’t feel like its all my brand new exciting invention (I clearly was not the first - see below). In fact, I’m sure it’s quite common among personal language learning NY’s resolutions, to aim to be super-consistent.

ロータス wrote:Its like you read my mind from across the world lol. Was planning to do this for 2019 as well so will be nice to see how others do.


CarlyD wrote:On the 1st I'm starting my 365-Day Challenge, which, other than German every single day, I haven't totally worked out yet.
Last edited by PeterMollenburg on Sat Dec 29, 2018 1:27 am, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: The 2019 365 Day Language Challenge

Postby PeterMollenburg » Thu Dec 27, 2018 11:41 pm

RULES

Main principle of the challenge:
1. Choose one or more languages to study every single day for a year with a minimum requirement of 30 minutes per day.


Start and end dates:
1. The competition start date is 1st January, 2019, but will extend out for late-comers to January 31st 2019. The end date comes after 365 days of study, so if you begin studying on Jan 1st 2019, your last day of study is 31st Dec 2019.

2. Those who begin later than 1st of January 2019, but before the cut off date of Jan 31st 2019, must finish after 365 days of study, so if ou begin yon Jan 20th 2019, your last day of study will be Jan 19th 2020.

3. You can start after 31st of January 2019, but you must finish 31st Jan 2020. Therefore, you can still participate, you just won't be participating for a full year.

4. If you post that you want to join the challenge on a date earlier than your post, you can do so. For example if it's February 17th and you post that you want to join but your start date is January the 31st, this is acceptable. If you have studied every day since January 31st the same language(s) you are announcing to participate with and you have been completing 30 minutes a day for your language(s), then there are no penalties. If you have missed days, then the usual penalties apply from your back-dated commencement date (in this case January 31st).

As a reminder, if your official start date is between Jan 1st 2019 and Jan 31st 2019, your finish date will be after 365 days of study (if you take one day off the same date the following year - eg. you first day of study is Jan 27th 2019, your last day of study will be on Jan 26th 2020) However if you sign up for a commencement date after Jan 31st 2019, the latest possible competition end date remains Jan 31st 2020, so the competition will not be a full year for such competitors.

There is currently no limit set on retrospective start dates, as to how far back your start date can be, so for the moment this will be a case by case discussion until further notice.


Time required to study each day:
1. 30 minutes per day minimum of language study for each of your announced chosen language(s)...
...and/or 30 minutes per day minimum of language study for each 'generic study block' which allows for learning a combination of pre-announced (by the competitor) languages without having to necessarily study all of your announced languages every day, just so long as you meet the minimum time requirements of 30 minutes for the block. (see The 'generic’ option, below for further details).

2. Daily study must be completed not necessarily before midnight, but before your longer period of sleep. Therefore you may have fallen asleep after midnight, realised you've not completed your study upon waking after a short period of sleep, then go ahead and complete it, say from 2am - 2.30, and then return to sleeping for a lengthy (longer) period. As long as the study is completed before your main block of sleep!

3. Studying 30 minutes per day does not have to be in one continuous block. As long as you reach a total of 30 minutes minimum (you can do more if you like).

4. More than 30 minutes learning a day is fine, but the minimum requirement is 30 minutes, so no double, triple challenges. You can opt to do as much as you like (I'll personally be aiming for more), but for this challenge it's just 30 minutes you need, beyond that is your own business, since the idea is to develop a super strong habit of unbroken daily study - it's not to chase study hours per sé (although, sure, more time on task is better), the aim is to create consistent effort EVERY DAY OF THE YEAR, or as close to that mark as possible.

5. Studying 29 minutes (or less) is not acceptable. You can't make up that minute or few minutes the next day. That's a fail - loss of 7 days (see 'penalties' below)

6.There’s no loss of time for any narration/instructions in a langauge other than your target (announced) language(s) (excluding TV, see paragraph below). For example a French course with lots of English instructions, bilingual dictionaries, a podcast with loads of English narration. If you do an hour of ‘French’ and you’ve been going over detailed grammatical explanations or introductory background of a course and it’s all in English, it still counts for your French study session, as that’s what you’re reading about, and using, content to learn your target language.

However, when counting movies and or series you must count only the time you hear or read (subtitles) in your target language(s) you are counting towards this competition. This doesn’t mean you have to eliminate short pauses in dialogue (a long pause of many minutes is different- use your own judgement), but a movie in Mandarin and Korean with 20 minutes of Mandarin and 90 minutes of Korean can only count as 20 minutes of Mandarin learning if Mandarin is your target language (unless of course you’re learning both languages, in which case you can also count 90 minutes of Korean study). What you can’t do is count 110 minutes for Korean or 110 minutes for Mandarin.

If you’re using a TV-like program to study with, such as Yabla, then if you learn German as your target language with Yabla for 30 minutes and again there’s lots of English instructions, translations and ‘guidance’, then it still counts as 30 minutes of German study.

What constitutes as acceptable study/learning?
1. As long as you are doing an activity in which you feel you are learning, then it is acceptable. In other words, if speaking is how you want to spend your learning/study time, then that's fine (provided it's not something that comes so easy to you that you're not really learning much at all- be honest with yourself and this challenge). So, yes you can read, watch, speak, use grammar books, whatever. As long as you are learning!

2. You do not have to do the same type of activity every day or even within one day. Do what you like/want. The idea here is to stay motivated, so stay in the game using whatever keeps you engaged with the language. Use grammar books but you're now on holiday? Read something, speak to people in your TL if you're on location. Just ensure you're learning and you're meeting the minimum requirement of 30 minutes/day.

Other language competitions/challenges:
1. Study/learning time can overlap with any other language challenges (eg Super Challenge, 6 week challenge, Output Challenge). 30 minutes of reading for example which equates to x nbr of pages for the SC can definitely be seen as your daily requirement. Speaking out loud for language exchanges to add to the Output Challenge? Again - are you learning? (or at least trying to learn ;) - we don't always actually appear to have learned much, but if you're trying that's fine), it counts for this challenge.


Requirements for competitors in this or other threads :
1. Announce your intention to join here in this thread, for which language(s), and your start date.

2. You do not need a reply from me or anyone else of your announced intentions before you can start. Start on the date you announce and at some point you will appear on the List of Competitors with your announced start date. I say this in case of my absence.

3. It is encouraged that you announce when you fail to study here in the The 2019 365 Day Language Challenge - SCORING thread and deduct the days accordingly (see 'penalties'). Although this can simply be done at the end of the month scoring (see below).

4. If you wish to withdraw (at any time), please announce it in this thread or the scoring thread: The 2019 365 Day Language Challenge - SCORING

5. A monthly update of contenders and their 'scores' can be found in this thread: The 2019 365 Day Language Challenge - SCORING to keep track of scoring.

6. At the end of each month each person should announce their score for the month and their overall score (so keep track of your own scoring!) in the thread above in point 5. The second person to do so should copy the first person, so that the second person’s score is listed with the first (and placed in the correct position, so it works as a leaderboard), the third person copies the first two and adds themself and their scores, the fourth copies the first three and adds themself and their scores, and so on.


Studying more than one language each day:
1. There are two options for studying more than one language -
*30 minutes a day per language, or
*generic, which means 30 minutes of any language (see 'generic' option further down - more than 30 minutes of 'generic' is possible).


The 'generic' option:
1. You can opt to join with 'generic' language if you cannot foresee being able to study your chosen languages (plural) every day (30 minutes each), for example, or perhaps you want to study one language for a while then swap to another later in the year (and not have to do both all year).

2. Choosing 'generic', like choosing one specific language, means that it's one 30 min block each day of study that's required, you just happen to be changing languages (either within the same day or not - you could study one for months and then change to another later in the year for example, or study 10 minutes of three languages in a day).

To clarify, if you specifically choose two separate languages (not generic), Say German and French, then it's one hour a day (30 min of each language), not 30 min of any, as would be the case with 'generic'. Thus, generic is choosing to study a mixture of languages as per the 30 minute minimum (30 minutes total), while stated specific languages are studied separately 30 minutes each per day.

3. You can choose a language twice if you have it within a generic group and as an individual language as well. So if you have Spanish and Generic x 1, you would have to study Spanish 30 minutes a day and all your other languages (including Spanish as well) within you generic group of languages, so it might look something like this on a daily basis: 30 minutes of Spanish + 30 minutes of any of the following: Spanish, French, Russian, Swahili.

4. You can change at any point during the competition and go from generic to specific languages or specific languages to generic. See the section Adding languages, removing languages, not studying languages for long periods, dropping out (of one language or altogether) or changing study 'modes' below on how to go about this.

5. Those who choose generic are encouragef to announce their languages up front of the competition but it is not obligatory.

6. You can join for more than one block of generic. Why? Well you may want to challenge yourself to get an hour of study done each day, or 90 minutes, for example, since you could be studying 10 languages at once, all of which are very important to you.

If you join with 2 blocks of generic, you must study 60 minutes per day of your mixture of languages. If you join with 3 blocks you must study 90 minutes per day.

7. You can join for 'generic' and (an)other language(s). Eg. I want to join for 'generic' because I will be studying Spanish over summer and then later on I'll be in Russia, so i'll be switching to Russian. I also want to study French throughout the year, so I want to join for 'generic' and 'French'. This equates to 1 hour of study a day throughout the year (30 min for generic comprising of two languages and 30 min for French).


Scoring:
1. One day of study = 1 day/point

2. Keep track of your own 'score', including deductions for missed days. I don't want to chase people for their scores and I'm sure no-one else really wants to put their hand up for it either. So please be honest.

3. See 'Penalties' (below) for how much to deduct when missing days or blocks of study.

4. If you have announced you’ll be studying/learning more than one language (and not as the ‘generic’ option) for this challenge, keep your scoring separate for each language, as some days you could miss one language, but not the other(s).

5. If you’ve chosen ‘generic’ and a dedicated sole language (eg generic and Japanese), keep your scoring for Japanese and generic apart, since as with the previous point above you might not study any languages from your generic block of 30 minutes one day but do manage to complete your 30 minutes of Japanese study. Thus, the penalty would only apply to ‘generic’ and not Japanese.

6. A monthly update of contenders and their 'scores' can be found in this thread: The 2019 365 Day Challenge SCORING to keep track of scoring.

7. At the end of each month each person should announce their score for the month and their overall score (so keep track of your own scoring!) in the thread above in point 6. The second person to do so should copy the first person, so that the second person’s score is listed with the first (and placed in the correct position, so it works as a leaderboard), the third person copies the first two and adds themself and their scores, the fourth copies the first three and adds themself and their scores, and so on.


Exceptions to missing days of study:
1. The only possible exception to studying every single day, is if you lose a day flying crossing the international date line, in which case, you can either add one day to your finish date, or do two days worth of study while travelling. Be reasonable, if you're just flying for a heck of a long period of time, this doesn't constitute actually losing a day. You can study in flight.


Penalties:
1. If you skip a day, you lose 7 days/points for each 30 minute block(s) of study you have missed .

Explanation: Basically, let's say you're up to 100 days in a row, but on day 101 you miss a day of study, and you’ve signed up for one language or one block of generic stidy, you get impose a 7 day (or ‘points’) penalty on yourself, so your 'score' becomes 93. On day 102 if you study properly again, you score would be 94. The idea is to punish you (by taking 7 days/points off your 'score') for skipping a day. The idea is to discourage one from missing days so we remain consistent.

Thus, if you do miss/skip a day, you must study the next day, you cannot take a break and study 7 days later. You lose 7 days (or 'points'), but must continue. You can take a break if you want, but each lost 30 min block of study = another 7 days off your score.

2. Studying 29 minutes (or less) is not acceptable. You can't make up that minute or few minutes the next day. That's a fail - loss of 7 days (see 'penalties' below)

3. If studying more than one language and you have announced it as such at the beginning of the challenge, such as French and German, which is a total of 60 minutes study per day (30 min each) and you miss a day for all of them, deduct 7 days for each language missed, since scoring for each language is separate. For the ‘generic’ option and missed days, read furher below.

4. If studying more than one language, and you miss a day, but not with all your languages, you’re only penalised for the languages you’ve not studied that day. Thus you will have separate scores for each of your languages. Therefore, it’s advisable to study your languages each day in order of priority on any given day. This isn’t a rule, just advice, as it would be a shame to be penalised for missing days with your priority language(s) while you remain unscathed regarding less important languages.

5. If you’ve chosen ‘generic’ and a dedicated sole language (eg generic and Japanese), keep your scoring for Japanese and generic apart, since as you might not study any languages from your generic block of 30 minutes one day but do manage to complete your 30 minutes of Japanese study. Thus, the penalty of 7 days/points would only apply to ‘generic’ and not to Japanese.

6. For those studying multiple blocks of generic and missing some of your studying on a given day, but not all-
Example; If you have joined with generic x 3 blocks and one day you only get one block (i.e. 30 minutes) completed, you will be penalised 14 days. Why? Well if you had chosen 3 languages instead of generic x 3 blocks, say French, German and Italian and you only got to study French for 30 minutes on a particluar day, then you'd be penalised 7 days each for the languages you missed, which would be both German and Italian, and that's a total penalty of 14 days. So the penalty is the same for those who choose multiple blocks of generic but don't get all their study done it just ends up applying to ‘generic’ and not to specific languages.


I did some reflecting and felt that competitors who really are sick of certain languages, or really really want to add a new one, seem to be too restricted, so I added the follwing section (below) to the rule book. It provides more flexibility and removes penalties for those studying the generic option, affording them the same flexibility. Why no penalties? Well, really by default, if adding a language later than Jan 31st 2019, you're at a disadvantage, as the end date won't move from any later than Jan 31st 2020. And removing languages means they stop gaining days/points. That is enough to discourage frequent changes, imo. Furthermore those studying generic, their idea is simply to study every day, not necessarily one language, so adding and removing languages for them makes no difference either.

I also feel such rules provide the freedom to continue studying without stifling momentum.


Adding languages, removing languages, not studying languages for long periods, dropping out (of one language or altogether) or changing study 'modes'
1. There are no penalties for such changes.

2. As with joining the competition for the first time, you may add (a) new language(s) after the initial start date of January 1st 2019 at any point of the competition.

The initial start date is January 1st 2019, but you can still join the competition for the first time or add a new language for a full year of the competition up to the cut off date of January 31st 2019. If you add a new language between January 1st and January 31st 2019, your end date for the newly added language(s) would be one year from your start date. Thus, you may have different end dates for your languages if you had commenced with (an)other language(s) earlier.

3. If you want to add a new language later than January 31st 2019, then your end date remains January 31st 2020 no matter when you started after January 31st 2019. The reasoning here is that there needs to be a fair end-date for everyone in the competition, thus a cut-off date avoids a never-ending competition.

4. You are free to remove languages from your list.

5. If you do not study a language on your list, there's no consequence apart from the fact that the days you have not studied the language, if numerous, will soon see your score plumet. If you are not interested in continuing with the language (or the competition), please advise so and it will be noted on the competitors list.

6. There is no penalty for adding or removing languages with the generic option of study either.

7. Please announce any changes to your list of languages (including those who study using the generic option)

8. If you want to change from generic study to individual languages, you must do your best to calculate, honestly, roughly how much time you spent up to the date of change studying each language and convert it to individual scores.

Example. You were studying French and Spanish, you're on day 100. You studied French 60% of the time and Spanish 40% of the time (no need to be too technical, a fair estimate will suffice). Your generic score (you hadn't missed a single day) on day 100 was 100. On day 100 your French score is calculated to be 60 and your Spanish score, 40. You then must go on to study 30 minutes a day of each of your two languages (1 hour total).

Example 2. Same as above, but you only want to continue with French (and drop Spanish altogether). Your French score is again 60 at day 100.

Example 3. You did Norwegian for 3 months and Japanese for 1 month, you now want to study them individually and add Danish. You begin day 101 before studying with a score of 75 for Norwegian, 25 for Japanese and 0 for Danish. You must now do 3 blocks of 30 minutes of study a day for each language.

9. If you want to change from individual languages to generic.
Example. You are learning two languages - Korean and Irish. It is day 100. You have missed three days for Korean (100 - 21 = 79) and one day for Welsh (100 - 7 = 93). You want to combine both languages into one block of generic study. Add both language scores together and divide by the number of languages. Thus 79 + 93 = 172. 172/2 = 86.


Elimination:
1. You won't be eliminated for continually missing days, but your score will look dismal and obviously be of no threat to others in terms of 'winning'.


---------------------------------------------------------------------
These rules are open to being altered but preferably not after the 31st Dec 2018. Realistically however, given the late notification of this challenge, there may be adjustments after that date, so they must be fair to those who've already started.

This entry is to be edited, expanded upon, revised, redefined etc in an ongoing nature

***I may be absent for long periods in 2019, in which case I am suggesting that this challenge and it's rules are not solely under my control. I'd be happy for others to nominate themselves/ be nominated now or later for consulting on technicalities of rules. The challenge is pretty straightforward, so I think with some common sense and the occasional clarification, post initial commencement, it should almost take care of itself***
Last edited by PeterMollenburg on Wed Jan 16, 2019 5:12 am, edited 40 times in total.
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Re: The 2019 365 Day Language Challenge

Postby PeterMollenburg » Thu Dec 27, 2018 11:58 pm

LIST OF COMPETITORS

Total competitors = 52

Start date: January 1st, 2019: (46 competitors)
Adrianslont - French, Indonesian
aloysius - Russian, French
Ani - Spanish
Aravinda - German
Asarena - Korean
atiekay - Japanese
avalon - Modern Greek
CarlyD - German
Cèid Donn - Generic x 1 (Celtic languages, French, Indonesian)
chamomile232 - Korean

coldrainwater - Spanish
Elsa Maria - Danish, Dutch
Fenderman - Spanish
fjib - Korean
Iceberg - Generic (German + other languages)
IronMike - Generic x 1 (Russian, Esperanto, Italian)
Iszlak - Russian
jacquemarie - French
Jaleel10 - Spanish, German
Jim - French

-JM- - French
JohannaNYC - Croatian, French
kanewai - Spanish, German
kathrs - Portuguese, Italian
koolawant - Japanese
languist - Generic x 1 (Spanish, Russian, French)
lavengro - Italian
Lianne - French
lingua - Italian
LunaMoonsilver - Mandarin

miho - English, French, Swedish, Italian, Persian, Japanese
mjfleck2000 - Spanish
NoManches - Spanish
Neurotip - Greek
PeterMollenburg - French, Dutch, Arabic (withdrew these 2 on 16/01/19 after 15 days of study, no missed days)
Radioclare - Russian
rdearman - Mandarin withdrew on Jan 06 (see top P16 for rdearman's comments)
Sarafina - French, Generic x 1 (Spanish and Japanese)
Serpent - Generic x 1 (English + other languages), English
Skynet - German, French
Soclydeza - Generic x 1 (German, Italian, Norwegian)

Spoonary - German withdrew. Final official day Jan 13th. Score -3 (see P18 for Spoonary's comments)
strannik - French, Russian, German
Teango - Generic x 1 (French, German, Hawaiian, Irish, Japanese, Middle Egyptian, New Zealand Sign Language, Persian, Russian, Spanish, and Zulu)
thoughtlessboy - Generic x 1 (French, Russian, Dutch)
tomgosse - French
Virat - French
ロータス - Mandarin

Start date: January 2nd, 2019:
Cavesa - German
ilolwhat - German

Start date: January 4th, 2019:
inkypod - Italian

Start date: January 7th, 2019:
Xenops - Japanese

Start date: January 10th, 2019:
SDPhil - Portuguese
zenmonkey - Generic x 1 (German, Hebrew, Setswana, Tibetan, Portuguese, Ladino, Yiddish, Tzotzil, Norwegian)
Last edited by PeterMollenburg on Wed Jan 16, 2019 3:26 am, edited 78 times in total.
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Re: The 2019 365 Day Language Challenge

Postby PeterMollenburg » Fri Dec 28, 2018 12:05 am

I am joining this challenge, am to begin on 1st Jan 2019 with these languages:

French
Dutch
Arabic
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Re: The 2019 365 Day Language Challenge

Postby kanewai » Fri Dec 28, 2018 12:22 am

I might be in, but first: how would you define "studying" for the challenge? Specifically, would reading or listening to a podcast for 30" count? And would immersion count? (e.g., if we're abroad and speaking our t.l. everyday, but not necessarily hitting the books).
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Re: The 2019 365 Day Language Challenge

Postby PeterMollenburg » Fri Dec 28, 2018 12:37 am

kanewai wrote:I might be in, but first: how would you define "studying" for the challenge? Specifically, would reading or listening to a podcast for 30" count? And would immersion count? (e.g., if we're abroad and speaking our t.l. everyday, but not necessarily hitting the books).


Yes, this is the tricky part.

I think if you are doing something intensively then it's easily determined as study. Output and extensive activities are harder to ascertain. I think everything should be allowed as long as you see it as a learning session- meaning that was the main objective. If you're out hanging out with friends and speaking your target language and that's something you'd usually do and have done for a while, I don't see that as study. If you're out hanging out with some new friends and your main objective is to improve the language, and the conversation is challenging at least at times, then I think that counts. Basically if the main objective is to improve your language, then it's study. If it's as easy as your native language then question yourself whether or not it's really study. Everyone is different, so if it is study for you, then fine. Watching a TV series extensively, but it's improving your language, then I think that could be deemed as study. Watching TV because you're avoiding other modes of study and the TV is absolutely no challenge at all, then are you really studying/learning? Ideally, I feel that intensive study should be the focus, but i'm biased as I prefer these forms of study. So, everything goes as long as you are learning and that was your intention with the chosen activity.

I can't question too much how others choose to learn even if I cannot fathom how one can learn using methods with which I can't envision how it's even possible to learn that way.

Some other examples- you travel to paris on a holiday and speak 30 min of french a day and since you're on holiday don't want to do your usual course or extensive reading. I think this is fine. It's encouraging one to use the language, to be realistic given your situation and to take a break.

You listen to a podcast on the way to work each day or on the train. You drown out for 15 minutes but you've been listening for 40 minutes. Well, be fair, deduct 15 minutes = 25 min. You've still another 5min to do at some point during the day.

Provided you are learning at the time you are engaging with the language, I think any form is acceptable.
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Re: The 2019 365 Day Language Challenge

Postby rdearman » Fri Dec 28, 2018 1:14 am

Does the 30 minutes have to be continuous? I would vote for yes. Since the goal is to develop a habit. Although I realise that might be difficult.
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Re: The 2019 365 Day Language Challenge

Postby PeterMollenburg » Fri Dec 28, 2018 1:19 am

rdearman wrote:Does the 30 minutes have to be continuous? I would vote for yes. Since the goal is to develop a habit. Although I realise that might be difficult.


Nope. Continuous not required, can break it up however you like, or however your day pans out. Too restrictive otherwise, I think. Good question, though. I will add the reply to the rules.
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Re: The 2019 365 Day Language Challenge

Postby ロータス » Fri Dec 28, 2018 1:42 am

Its like you read my mind from across the world lol. Was planning to do this for 2019 as well so will be nice to see how others do. Tho that -20 days seems a little high but I guess its like that to make you really think about if it worth it to be lazy and skip a day xD

Jan 1st and Mandarin.
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Re: The 2019 365 Day Language Challenge

Postby PeterMollenburg » Fri Dec 28, 2018 1:54 am

ロータス wrote:Its like you read my mind from across the world lol. Was planning to do this for 2019 as well so will be nice to see how others do. Tho that -20 days seems a little high but I guess its like that to make you really think about if it worth it to be lazy and skip a day xD

Jan 1st and Mandarin.


Well, anyone is welcome to be a joint 'administrator' ;) Maybe I read your mind? I suspect you've not been wearing your tin-foil hat lately? Am I right?
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