Indonesian resources

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Speakeasy
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Indonesian resources

Postby Speakeasy » Tue Jan 05, 2016 2:28 pm

Indonesian Resources
Lately, both here on this forum and on the HTLAL, there have been a couple of questions concerning the availability of resources for studying Indonesian. While I have not studied the language, I thought that it might be timely to create a separate discussion thread to which other members might wish to add their own comments and recommendations. Here is what I have so far:

HTLAL G-Search
A G-Search of the HTLAL, using "Indonesian" as the sole criterion yields in excess of 2,600 discussion threads. For the purposes of this file, I have attached the links to Indonesian Language http://how-to-learn-any-language.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=2929 and to Malay and Indonesian Resources http://how-to-learn-any-language.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=17731.

Indonesian Series by Cornell University (John Wolff)
Some years ago, Cornell University published a series of texts by John Wolf. I suspect that the course employed the audio-lingual method or a modified version of it. The course was very well received. Unfortunately, according to some of the customer reviews on Amazon, there was a technical issue with the accompanying DVD that contained the audio files. I do not know whether or not this issue was ever resolved. I suggest that anyone interested in learning Indonesian, send an Email to Cornell and ask them about this problem. From my brief research, here is a list of the materials, which can be found on Amazon, AbeBooks, the Cornell University Press, and elsewhere:
Beginning Indonesian Through Self-Instruction (Books 1,2,3)
Formal Indonesian
Indonesian Conversations
Indonesian Readings


Sentence Patterns of Indonesian
Addendum: After posting most of the content of this particular discussion thread, I continued searching the Internet and I came across the textbook "Sentence Patterns of Indonesian" written by Soenjono Dardjowidjojo, published by PALI language Texts: Southeast Asia, University Press of Hawaii, 1978. 434 pages, and which sells for about 20 $US. One seller provides the following description: "Comprehensive presentation of the linguistic system of Indonesian, intended for use in first and 2nd year courses. Despite an initial appearance of being easy to learn, Indonesian has a complex system of affixes that must be mastered before acceptable sentences can be constructed. A major effort of this book is therefore devoted to providing understanding of these affixes, especially those used to form verbs and nouns, and their ramifications in sentence construction. The author's approach to understanding is oral-aural; patterns of structure are immediately followed by extensive drills and other exercises after being introduced. Each chapter also includes sections on pronunciation and useful notes on behavior according to Indonesian culture patterns.". I continued my search of this title and it appears that the University Press of Hawaii offers the audio cassette tapes for the astonishing sum of 500 $US, which I suspect is an old entry that someone in their Sales Department has forgotten to delete or otherwise update. I would assume that an enquiry to the university would clarify matters, including the availability of the recordings via some other media and current pricing. Addendum: In late January 2016, I inquired of the University of Hawaii Press whether the audio recordings might still be available as cassette tapes, CDs, or MP3 files and was advised that they no longer exist.

Teach Yourself Complete Indonesian
Generally speaking, users of the Teach Yourself courses submit positive comments and this seems to be the case for the Indonesian course. As you might be aware, these courses offer a very basic introduction to a given language, aiming for the A1 level. However, a number of customer reviews on Amazon mention that the CD audio track numbers as printed in the course book are not well-synchronized with the actual tracks on the CD! I do not know whether or not this problem was resolved by the printing of a new book or the issuing of new CDs.

Routledge Colloquial Indonesian
Generally speaking, the Routledge Colloquial series has been well received, provided that the students understand that the publisher has deliberately limited the scope of their courses to meet the basic needs of a traveller; that is, get in, conduct your basic affairs, get out. The customer reviews on Amazon are about three stars and the complaints seem to be that some vocabulary used in some of the dialogues is not introduced until later in the book. I consider this to be a minor issue.

Pimsleur Indonesian
Pimsleur offers a Phase I course (30 units) for Indonesian. Their courses are known for their ease-of-use and, generally speaking, I have been very pleased with them. In my view, this course would represent an interesting and low-stress opportunity to "develop a feel for" the sounds and the rhythm language. However, given its high price, the lack of a glossary, and the fact that one must infer the grammar from the lessons, I do not think that this would be my first choice.

Assimil L'Indonésien
The customer reviews of Assimil L'Indonésien on Amazon.FR are, for the most, very positive and the average score is around 4.5 stars. Regrettably, the course appears to be available only in French. Still, were one to acquire a basic knowledge of Indonesian through the study of some other course, the Assimil course could be used as a set of "similar to native materials" wherein the dialogues would be used as practice materials.

DLI Basic Indonesian
Unfortunately, the old DLI Basic Indonesian course is not listed on the JLU-archives website. By searching the ERIC website, I came across most of the textbooks for the course. http://eric.ed.gov/?q=indonesian+basic+course AND http://eric.ed.gov/?q=indonesian+basic+course&id=ED024955. I presume that this course would have used the audio-lingual method of instruction; that is, dialogues, basic sentences, sentence-pattern drills, narratives and readings. As you might be aware, some individuals continue to offer their own collections of the old FSI and DLI courses, for modest prices, on EBay and elsewhere. I located the following offer which, from reading the course description and looking at the onscreen images, leads me to believe that it is, indeed, the DLI Basic Indonesian course or, at the very least, something similar from the early 1970's. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Learn-Indonesian-Indonesia-Language-Training-Course-Guide-/190619231695?hash=item2c61caa5cf:g:caQAAOxyV85RyyRA.

DLI GLOSS Indonesian Files
Although not a course, the DLI GLOSS website contains a few hundred lessons and exercises on the Indonesian language. My experiences and those of other students are that the GLOSS files are excellent for practicing a given language.

Linguaphone Indonesian
Linguaphone used to sell an Indonesian course that is now out-of-print. I am not at all aware whether this was one of their rather Spartan efforts from the 1950's or one of their more complete efforts from the 1970's.

Indiana University CeLt
The Indiana University CeLt Recorded Archives contain the recordings for an old Indonesian Basic Course: http://www.iu.edu/~celtie/indonesian_archive.html. I have given a quick listen to the initial lessons and I can confirm that this is most definitely an audio-lingual course: dialogues, basic sentences, sentence-pattern drills. In response to my recent request for information, the CeLt advised me, "Our old card catalog lists those materials simply as “Intensive Indonesian Program” by Harsono & Baird, 1965." I have been trying to locate a copy of the accompanying textbook but my efforts have not yet met with success. I have sent a request to the Indiana University's Southeast Asia Studies department asking them if they might have a copy of the textbook. If I receive a reply, I will advise further. UPDATE: The Librarian for South Asian and Southeast Asian Studies, Indiana University, kindly replied to my enquiry advising me that they have no record of the afore-mentioned textbook. This is a real shame, as the audio recordings, which are about 15 hours in length, are of a very high quality. Sigh, perhaps a fellow member will offer to transcribe them, along with an English translation, for posting on the FSI-Languages-Courses database ... sigh.

An audio-lingual course in Bahasa Indonesia / H. Hendrata
Under the separate discussion thread "Audio lingual language programs", PeterBeischmidt made mention of this course as follows: "I found an entry for what appears to be another audio-lingual course for Indonesian:

Code: Select all

Titel: An audio-lingual course in Bahasa Indonesia / H. Hendrata
Sonst. Personen: Hendrata, Hendy
Ort/Jahr: Carlton : Hendrata, [1987]
Land: Australien

They also seem to have the tapes, unless they've thrown them away without updating the catalogue."

University of Michigan LRC
Recently, the University of Michigan LRC ceased selling the archived audio recordings that were created some years ago to accompany textbooks, often published by the UofM, for a number of the less-commonly-studied languages. Many of these textbooks used the audio-lingual method of instruction or a modified version of it. In lieu of selling the archived audio recordings, the UofM now offers them free-of-charge as MP3 downloads, in response to specific requests. Since the university offers a course in Indonesian, it is possible that free-of-charge downloadable recordings exist. Requests should be directed to: [url]http://www.ls[url][/url]a.umich.edu/lrc/sales[/url]. Should anyone receive the LINK to such files, I am sure that other forum members would appreciate it being posted here under this discussion thread.

Bahasa Indonesia: Introduction to Indonesian Language and Culture, Books 1 & 2, Yohanni Johns
The Amazon customer reviews of the two-volume set "Bahasa Indonesia" by Yohanni Johns are quite positive: http://www.amazon.com/Bahasa-Indonesia-Book-Introduction-Indonesian/dp/0945971567/ref=sr_1_11?ie=UTF8&qid=1452199153&sr=8-11&keywords=learn+indonesian. Unfortunately, I have been unable to locate audio recordings for this course.

Online Indonesian Courses
The following online Indonesian courses seem to be popular with users
Learning Indonesian Online http://www.semarang.nl/indonesian/learning-indonesian-free-en.html
Learning Indonesian http://www.learningindonesian.com/
Linguanaut Learn Indonesian http://www.learningindonesian.com/
Indonesian at Northern Illinois University http://www.seasite.niu.edu/indonesian/
BahasaKita - Indonesian Language Online Resource http://www.bahasakita.com/
University of Hawaii - The Indonesian Way http://ipll.manoa.hawaii.edu/indonesian/courses/ind103/the-indonesian-way/

Indonesian Language Links
Well, fancy that, someone else has built a list! http://www.languagelinksdatabase.com/indonesian/

Perhaps other members could comment?

EDIT: Included "Addendum" concerning "Sentence Patterns of Indonesian" audio recordings.
Last edited by Speakeasy on Thu Jan 28, 2016 8:17 pm, edited 11 times in total.
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Speakeasy
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Speakeasy » Tue Jan 05, 2016 6:55 pm

Transcription of the Audio Recordings to the "Intensive Indonesian Program"
As a continuation of the discussion thread above, I am launching this request for volunteers to transcribe the audio recordings that are presently available on the Indiana University CeLt Recorded Archives website, for subsequent archiving, along with a copy of the recordings, on the FSI-Languages-Courses database, subject to Ericounet's approval. The staff at the CeLt are under the impression that the original text was a well-intentioned project that was never published, perhaps for lack of funding. They have already released the audio recordings to the public as they have no record of a copyright. Given that the FSI does not seem to have created their own course for Basic Indonesian or, at least, that one cannot be located, coupled with the fact the audio recordings for the DLI Basic Indonesian course are not publicly available, I believe that this small project would be a welcome addition to the greater community of language-learners, particularly those who appreciate the audio-lingual method of instruction. I completed a similar project for the DLI German Basic course Supplementary Pattern Drills. Based on my experience, this project would not take much time.
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Daristani
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Daristani » Thu Jan 07, 2016 9:33 pm

I'm commenting a bit late on this thread because I've been searching my computer files in vain for the old DLI Indonesian Basic Course, which I was pretty sure I had but haven't been able to find.

Back in 2009, Fat-Tony, a member on the "old" HTLAL forum, uploaded a lot of DLI language courses, including Indonesian, for members to download; per my recollection, the Indonesian course was a single and rather lengthy course, rather than the assortment of disparate materials for Indonesian now available on the DLI site (https://jlu.wbtrain.com/sumtotal/langua ... an%20SOLT/).

I recall having sent this course to another forum member after Fat-Tony's links had expired. Unfortunately, I can't find it anywhere in my current files, and assume that it somehow went astray in computer crashes, migrating from one computer to another, etc., over the last few years.

I don't know whether or not Fat-Tony is still around very much on this or the older forum, or whether anyone else might have downloaded the Indonesian course at the time, but it may well be that someone on the forum has a copy of these materials that could be made available.

Also, looking at the description of the Indonesian course offered on EBay that Speakeasy found, I suspect that this may well be the original DLI Basic Course. The seller provides no useful information on the origins of the course, but given the brief description buried in all the verbiage ("1578 pages in PDF format and over 29 hours of MP3 audio"), it looks like it might well be a DLI course. In any event, the price is very cheap for that much PDF/MP3 material, even if the seller is profiting from material that might otherwise be in the public domain.
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Adrianslont
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Adrianslont » Fri Jan 08, 2016 3:58 am

I can add a little to this, based on my own Indonesian studies.

Linguaphone
It's from the seventies as there are references to hippies!

There are forty lessons and I used it as my first course, though I was a false beginner. Pretty good first course; there's a story thread over the forty units and the storyline and characters are interesting enough. I think it's well graded and the topics and language are good if a little formal.
Each unit has a conversation of two or three minutes and some audio-lingual exercises. I don't really like drills so edited them out and just used the conversations. I did my own thing with them, listening to them repeatedly in the car, and also reading the pretty good language and cultural notes that come in the book at home. I sometimes did transcribing and sometimes made Anki cards with audio.
After thirty units I got a bit bored with it and just listened to the last ten units in the car.
It served me well but sometimes the voice acting is pretty stilted. Other times it's fine.

Assimil
I haven't been as a methodical with Assimil, mainly because I found something else I prefer.
I did work through about the first twenty units, listening, listening and reading, reading the language and cultural notes. I've listened to later units for practice in the car. I think I will return to it at some point because I think it has something to offer. The language is a little more colloquial than Linguaphone and they even throw in some Javanese.
How did I find it? Well, I managed to use it quite readily despite having what is probably only A2 French. I guess I had some Indonesian by then, though. Some lessons were better than others. Some seemed a little forced in order to cover some language point, others quite natural and occasionally humorous. I liked the voice actors and they sounded more everyday than the Linguaphone actors to me. 100 lessons.

Bahasa Inggris until Studi Di Australia

BIUSDA as I like to abbreviate it is actually an English language course for Indonesians planning to study at university, language college or technical college in Australia. It was broadcast on Radio Australia and is available for download online. Although students of Indonesian are not the intended audience, I have got fantastic use out of it using it to learn Indonesian at an intermediate level.
There are 26 episodes, each 20 minutes long. There are a bunch of characters that are featured throughout in a kind of narrative as they come to Australia, study and do stuff. Each episode has bilingual dialogues, advice for the intending overseas student in Indonesian, an interview with a student about their experiences in Australia and a little pronunciation. Each episode is about 80 per cent Indonesian and the English really doesn't get in the way. Fantastic and free!

http://m.radioaustralia.net.au/indonesi ... -australia

The Indonesian Way
I've had a quick look at this course from the University of Hawaii and it looks pretty good. You seem to be able to do it online or download print, audio and premade Anki decks. And all free. If I hadn't started linguaphone I probably would have done this. Looks like quality and it's totally free!

I hope there is someone on the forum who finds that all helpful!
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Adrianslont
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Adrianslont » Fri Jan 08, 2016 12:22 pm

I forgot to say that Bahasa Inggris untuk Studi di Australia has the bonus of transcripts. This is gold for students of Indonesian as it's basically native speaker podcast material with transcripts and I don't know of any other Indonesian podcast that has them. I only know of news podcasts from SBS in Australia, the Japanese outfit that does various languages and there is an American origin podcast, too. None of them have transcripts. And Indonesia doesn't seem to produce podcasts. If I'm mistaken about that, please put me straight!
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Speakeasy
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Speakeasy » Fri Jan 22, 2016 10:46 pm

Unpaid Labour ... Yours Perhaps?

A couple of weeks ago, I noticed that there had been increased “chatter” on the language forum concerning audio-lingual courses for a number of languages, including Indonesian. Although I have not studied Indonesian myself and have no particular plans to do so, I decided to open the discussion thread “Indonesian Resources” above.

During my search for materials and links under this topic, I came across the Indonesian audio recordings that are freely available on the Indiana University CeLt Recorded Archives website: http://www.iu.edu/~celtie/indonesian_archive.html. In my communications with the CeLt staff, they advised me that they had an index card record of the origin of these recordings but that they did not have the corresponding textbook. I consulted the Librarian of the Indiana University’s Southeast Asian faculty and they, too, did not have a copy of the textbook, nor apparently do any of the faculty. Between them, they surmised that this was a project that was never completed, possibly for lack of funding. I find this somewhat of a shame as, upon a quick review of the recordings themselves, it becomes abundantly clear that the audio-lingual method was employed. It occurred to me that an opportunity exists to restore a portion of the original textbook through the preparation of a transcript of the Indonesian audio files accompanied by an English translation. Obviously, only someone who possess both languages could prepare such a document … and my thoughts turned to all of you … well, okay, to some of you!

Would anyone be interested in “volunteering” for such a project? I appreciate that it would represent an investment of personal time and we all experience multiple demands on this precious resource. My hope is to find someone who would take on this task and that the resulting document would be offered to the Indiana University for hosting on their website to accompany the audio recordings. So, who’s “all in” on this project? Thank you for your consideration.
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Daristani
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Daristani » Sun Dec 24, 2017 4:49 pm

I apologize for reviving such an old thread, but since the heading is "Indonesian resources", I thought this would be a good place to add a couple of items in case they might be useful to people seeking just such resources:

The DLI Basic Indonesian Course cited above has been found and made available online for free and legal download. I noted this in an entry on another thread https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 626#p89626 and now forum stalwart Expugnator has sent the materials to the Yojik site, where they can be downloaded:

https://fsi-languages.yojik.eu/language ... esian.html

To reiterate, this is the Indonesian Basic Course, which is NOT available on the DLI courses website at https://jlu.wbtrain.com/sumtotal/langua ... 20courses/

Regarding other public-domain materials, it's evident that the Foreign Service Institute produced an Indonesian Newspaper Reader; this can be downloaded at https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED024932.pdf

It seems that FSI produced a two-volume, 60-unit "Indonesian Basic Course" as well in 1959. I see little mention of this on-line, but my local university library seems to have a copy of it in an auxiliary library facility (evidently used for books that don't circulate very often). I'm hoping to get this after Christmas, and if so, will try to scan it for eventual posting on-line, on the assumption that it's in the public domain just like the other FSI courses.

As rare as the books seem to be, the audio is probably even rarer, but I have a sneaking suspicion that the audio Speakeasy found on the Indiana University CeLT website just MIGHT be associated with the FSI course. (The audio-lingual format at least sounds similar, although it appears that the CeLT materials don't extend to the full 60 units of the books.) Whether or not my surmise is valid will only become clear if and when I can get my hands on the books.

In the meantime, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to one and all.
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Daristani
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Daristani » Fri Jan 05, 2018 9:21 pm

Further to my above message, I regret to advise that my local university library only has volume two of the FSI "Indonesian Basic Course"; volume one has evidently been missing for quite some time. Accordingly, I can't determine whether the audio on the Indiana University CeLT site goes with this course, and I won't be scanning the book, as volume two without either volume one or the audio seems relatively useless.

Should anyone else be interested in tracking down the books in question, the only other libraries listed as having copies are Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah; the Fuller Theological Seminary Library in Pasadena, California; and the International Islamic University in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, so they don't seem to have been very broadly distributed. The audio is presumably at least as rare.
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Speakeasy
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Speakeasy » Sat Jan 06, 2018 12:22 am

FSI Indonesian Basic Course

Daristani, thank you very much for your efforts in tracking down the FSI Indonesian Basic Course.

Daristani wrote: ... It seems that FSI produced a two-volume, 60-unit "Indonesian Basic Course" as well in 1959. I see little mention of this on-line, but my local university library seems to have a copy of it in an auxiliary library facility (evidently used for books that don't circulate very often). I'm hoping to get this after Christmas, and if so, will try to scan it for eventual posting on-line, on the assumption that it's in the public domain just like the other FSI courses.

As rare as the books seem to be, the audio is probably even rarer, but I have a sneaking suspicion that the audio Speakeasy found on the Indiana University CeLT website just MIGHT be associated with the FSI course. (The audio-lingual format at least sounds similar, although it appears that the CeLT materials don't extend to the full 60 units of the books.) Whether or not my surmise is valid will only become clear if and when I can get my hands on the books ...


Daristani wrote:Further to my above message, I regret to advise that my local university library only has volume two of the FSI "Indonesian Basic Course"; volume one has evidently been missing for quite some time. Accordingly, I can't determine whether the audio on the Indiana University CeLT site goes with this course, and I won't be scanning the book, as volume two without either volume one or the audio seems relatively useless.

Should anyone else be interested in tracking down the books in question, the only other libraries listed as having copies are Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah; the Fuller Theological Seminary Library in Pasadena, California; and the International Islamic University in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, so they don't seem to have been very broadly distributed. The audio is presumably at least as rare.


Indian University CeLT website (Indonesian Resources)
In January 2016, I submitted a request to the Indian University CeLT for information regarding the source of the "Indonesian Basic Course (Bahasa Dialect)" audio files that are available on their website (publisher, author, verification of title, copyright status, et cetera) to which the Language Materials Coordinator replied: “Our old card catalog lists those materials simply as “Intensive Indonesian Program” by Harsono & Baird, 1965. I hope this little bit of information is helpful.” My searches of the internet have not revealed any information on this title.

The CeLT sound files themselves do not seem to identify the title of the course. Rather, they simply begin, in English, as; “Basic sentences, Unit 1” et cetera. There are 15 units in the CeLT collection. These audio files may very well turn out to be those of the FSI Indonesian Basic Course; however, in the absence of the corresponding course manuals and the lack of a transcription, they remain a mystery and of little practical use to would be learners of the language.

EDITED:
Typos.
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