Re: Indonesian resources

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Speakeasy
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Speakeasy » Fri Jan 31, 2020 11:54 pm

Asian Languages Reading Level Rated Children’s Books
Pinecone wrote:I was introduced to Let's Read: Asia's Free Digital Library for Children today. It has digital children's books in the following languages … Bahasa Indonesia …[inserted: amongst numerous others]
Asian Languages Reading Level Rated Children’s Books
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Axon
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Axon » Sun Mar 15, 2020 3:10 am

I have a resource here that might be useful to those of us struggling with fast informal Indonesian:

Titan Tyra

She's a vlogger from (I believe) Jakarta who produces a lot of content on different subjects and travels to a lot of places. Most excitingly, she's started putting dual subtitles on her videos!

Watch out for her code-switching, though. Like many Indonesians, she speaks English very well and mixes the two languages frequently. Here's one subtitle:

Dan aku gugup banget karena aku pikir tuh aku bisa keren gitu lho di akhir video

She actually says:

Dan aku nervous banget karena aku pikir tuh aku bisa keren gitu lho di at the end of this video
Last edited by Axon on Sun Mar 15, 2020 6:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Adrianslont
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Adrianslont » Sun Mar 15, 2020 8:00 am

Axon wrote:I have a resource here that might be useful to those of us struggling with fast informal Indonesian:

Titan Tyra

She's a vlogger from (I believe) Jakarta who produces a lot of content on different subjects and travels to a lot of places. Most excitingly, she's started putting dual subtitles on her videos!

Watch out for her code-switching, though. Like many Indonesians, she speaks English very well and mixes the two languages frequently. Here's one subtitle:

Dan aku gugup banget karena aku pikir tuh aku bisa keren gitu lho di akhir video

She actually says:

Dan aku nervous banget karena aku pikir tuh aku bisa keren gitu lho di at the end of this video

Thanks for the heads up on Titan Tyra, Axon. Anything with subs is gold - though I will have to be picky about which videos I watch - I am just too old and too male to identify with many of her videos (the make up, menstruasi dan BH ones jumped out at me!)

Please note that your first link doesn’t actually lead to Titan Tyra, though! It leads to another channel which is really excellent but is more formal and doesn’t have subs. I found Titan easily enough by putting her name into YouTube search.

Your second link does indeed lead to Titan, lho!

I have recently found a YouTube channel I like with subs, too - just indo ones, though. It’s a doctor with lots of health content. The language is more formal than Titan as you would expect.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtMUw9qZ_9VuS2eL_Rvzo3w
I haven’t really watched much of the doctor though - I’ve been doing a bit of work on informal language with srs cards based on the movie Cek Toko Sebelah. I started on that movie months ago and then paused - just started up again and just started actually paying attention to the particles, dong! Rather than just ignore them. Google translate, which I use when making the English subs for my cards, doesn’t do a very good job with the particles so I have been using the appropriate Wikipedia article and pages from Bahasa Kita to edit the cards manually. Only started doing that a few days ago - I think it’s a great way to go and should pay off. Slowly but steadily. Then I can move beyond kok, dong and deh - which I can only use/understand in limited contexts anyway.

Please point out any more subbed content you find! Cheers.
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Axon
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Axon » Sun Mar 15, 2020 6:20 pm

Adrianslont wrote:
Axon wrote:I have a resource here that might be useful to those of us struggling with fast informal Indonesian:

Titan Tyra

She's a vlogger from (I believe) Jakarta who produces a lot of content on different subjects and travels to a lot of places. Most excitingly, she's started putting dual subtitles on her videos!

Watch out for her code-switching, though. Like many Indonesians, she speaks English very well and mixes the two languages frequently. Here's one subtitle:

Dan aku gugup banget karena aku pikir tuh aku bisa keren gitu lho di akhir video

She actually says:

Dan aku nervous banget karena aku pikir tuh aku bisa keren gitu lho di at the end of this video

Thanks for the heads up on Titan Tyra, Axon. Anything with subs is gold - though I will have to be picky about which videos I watch - I am just too old and too male to identify with many of her videos (the make up, menstruasi dan BH ones jumped out at me!)

Please note that your first link doesn’t actually lead to Titan Tyra, though! It leads to another channel which is really excellent but is more formal and doesn’t have subs. I found Titan easily enough by putting her name into YouTube search.

Your second link does indeed lead to Titan, lho!

I have recently found a YouTube channel I like with subs, too - just indo ones, though. It’s a doctor with lots of health content. The language is more formal than Titan as you would expect.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtMUw9qZ_9VuS2eL_Rvzo3w
I haven’t really watched much of the doctor though - I’ve been doing a bit of work on informal language with srs cards based on the movie Cek Toko Sebelah. I started on that movie months ago and then paused - just started up again and just started actually paying attention to the particles, dong! Rather than just ignore them. Google translate, which I use when making the English subs for my cards, doesn’t do a very good job with the particles so I have been using the appropriate Wikipedia article and pages from Bahasa Kita to edit the cards manually. Only started doing that a few days ago - I think it’s a great way to go and should pay off. Slowly but steadily. Then I can move beyond kok, dong and deh - which I can only use/understand in limited contexts anyway.

Please point out any more subbed content you find! Cheers.


Fixed, thanks!

That EpicVice channel I linked mistakenly does actually have subs on its older videos - back when I started learning Indonesian I posted about them on my log. They were all Indonesian-only and hardcoded, but useful enough that I watched them over and over!
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Speakeasy
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Speakeasy » Sun Mar 15, 2020 9:35 pm

Hello, everyone. I have completely revised the original “Indonesian Resources” lists above. I inserted many of your suggestions, added a number of your comments as quotes, and included several materials which were not part of the previous lists. Thank you very much for your support.
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Speakeasy
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Speakeasy » Mon Mar 16, 2020 3:25 pm

Indonesian Language Course (1982)
Royal Australian Air Force School of Languages

RAAF Indonesian Language Course (1982) 0.JPG
RAAF Indonesian Language Course (1982) 0.JPG (81.89 KiB) Viewed 178 times

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE / Indonesian Language Course 1982 - eBay

I have GOT to start learning Indonesian!
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Speakeasy
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Speakeasy » Fri Mar 20, 2020 12:21 pm

While searching the website of eBay.AU for vintage language courses, I came across an offer for a few components of what appeared to be an Indonesian course conceived for classroom instruction. The websites of the major online booksellers seem to offer only a handful of the complete range of materials which formed this course. Below: a link to the publisher’s website and a brief description of the course. While it is relatively recent (2003), it does not show up under a general search of Pearson Education (Australia)’s website which may imply that, while stocks are available, it is now out-of-print.

Keren! Indonesian Course (2003) by Ian J. White – Pearson Education (Australia) / Cheng & Tsui
Publisher’s description: "Keren! is [a multi-level] Indonesian series for junior secondary students. Written for the LOTE national profiles, Keren! addresses the three strands of listening and speaking, reading and writing. This full colour book has a balance of content, clearly-explained grammar and cultural appreciation."

Given the target audience (junior secondary students), the ferociously expensive proposition of acquiring the complete set of materials, coupled with the availability of other resources, I do not really view this as being a viable option for most adult independent learners of Indonesian. Nevertheless, the very existence of regional materials, which do not show up on searches of Amazon.COM, et cetera, suggests that there might be other Indonesian courses of which we are not yet aware.
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Adrianslont
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Adrianslont » Fri Mar 20, 2020 8:42 pm

Speakeasy, I see second hand copies of various books in the Keren! Series every now and then in charity shops. If I knew it was so valuable I would have picked them up - as it is, I just thought I’m too old for them.

I don’t think it is out of print - at least it is in stock at the Language Book Shop, Sydney. They also have a lot of other Indonesian materials. Excuse the really long url - I don’t know how to make it short!

https://www.abbeys.com.au/category/indonesian-29863.do?company=&authorName=&title=&isbn=&all=&keywords=&txtQuery=&category=&bindFormat=&minPrice=&maxPrice=&minPubDate=&maxPubDate=&stock=&sort=&series=&paginator.pageIndex=1&stockAmountsFacetSelectionLabel=&bindFormatsFacetSelectionLabel=&salePriceFacetSelectionLabel=&pubDateFacetSelectionLabel=&categoryFacetSelectionLabel=&paginator.pageIndex=1&paginator.pageIndex=1&paginator.pageIndex=1&paginator.pageIndex=1

The Language Bookshop is pretty great, it is a subsidiary of Abbeys, a great family-run business in the centre of Sydney (I think the younger Abbeys still run it). It is a convenient bus ride for me. It has lots of languages and world-wide mail order.

There is also a Language Book Shop in Melbourne that I believe is also great and related. I have never been there.

I’m wondering what you mean by “regional materials”?
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Adrianslont
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Adrianslont » Fri Mar 20, 2020 8:46 pm

Speakeasy wrote:Indonesian Language Course (1982)
Royal Australian Air Force School of Languages

RAAF Indonesian Language Course (1982) 0.JPG

ROYAL AUSTRALIAN AIR FORCE / Indonesian Language Course 1982 - eBay

I have GOT to start learning Indonesian!

I can’t say these look very inviting when you look inside and find only typed vocabulary lists.

But yes, Indonesian is good to learn if you want to visit.

The Australian military has its own language school and also members of the defence forces who are on track to become officers but attending regular universities who sometimes study Indonesian.
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Speakeasy
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Re: Indonesian resources

Postby Speakeasy » Fri Mar 20, 2020 10:39 pm

Adrianslont wrote: I can’t say these look very inviting when you look inside and find only typed vocabulary lists ... The Australian military has its own language school and also members of the defence forces who are on track to become officers but attending regular universities who sometimes study Indonesian.
Thank you for dropping a line. Still, we’re worlds apart! Whenever I happen upon a set of vintage language-learning materials, irrespective of the target language involved, my limbs begin to tremble.

As to the RAAF Indonesian Course (1982), the description provided by the eBay seller reads: “folders containing the course notes and word lists”, which I would generally understand to mean the basic sentences, short dialogues, glossaries, and notes used in support of the classroom instruction which took place at the RAAF Language School. The breadth of the collection of course books in the photograph suggests a fairly substantial introductory course. However, as the Australian military does not have resources matching those of the American military, I doubt that their language courses are as in-depth as those of the DLI. I would go even further by surmising that audio recordings were not prepared to accompany the course books covered by this offer.

Had these manuals been prepared for a German course, I would have snapped them up (OCD). The RAAF Indonesian Course manuals have got to be better than any contemporary materials (sic: a hard-and-fast tenet of any true vintage language-learning materials fetishist). It is beyond me how you can resist the temptation.

EDITED:
Formatting
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