Audio lingual language programs

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ownerzeff
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Audio lingual language programs

Postby ownerzeff » Tue Sep 29, 2015 9:18 pm

Are there any other good comprehensive audio lingual language programs such as Modern Russian 1 and 2, or Speak Dutch, except for FSI/DLI?
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Speakeasy
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Re: Audio lingual language programs

Postby Speakeasy » Tue Sep 29, 2015 10:41 pm

This question is something like the HTLAL Discussion Thread http://how-to-learn-any-language.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=17167&PN=1 and the potential answers could be just as varied. Since there exist some excellent "series" of courses such as FSI Basic as well as "individual" courses such as Modern Russian, it would help to know which languages you are interested in studying. Nonetheless, there is a consensus that the following courses are well-designed and can be used for independent study whether or not they were designed for that purpose:

Introductory Level (A1-A2)
Teach Yourself
Routledge Colloquial
Michel Thomas (audio instruction with glossary)
Pimsleur (audio only) / Pimsleur Unlimited (audio plus limited online support)
Living Language Complete
FSI FAST
FSI Programmatic
DLI Headstart
DLI Gateway
Cortina
Fluenz (high-end, high-priced software)

Intermediate Level (B1-B2)
Assimil / Assimil Pefectionnement
Living Language Spoken World
Living Language Ultimate (two levels)
Linguaphone Complete & Advanced (two levels)
FSI Basic
DLI Basic

So, which languages are you interested in studying?

I just noticed the preamble to the question you submitted here: viewtopic.php?f=19&t=1298 wherein you opened with "Everybody knows about Assimil,FSI,DLI,Teach Yourself etc." and this leaves me wondering how your question above differs from your preamble.
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kyukumber
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Re: Audio lingual language programs

Postby kyukumber » Wed Sep 30, 2015 11:51 am

Here's a similar thread on HTLAL entitled "Audio-lingual courses besides FSI?."

And I'll list up the materials mentioned in the above thread.

Beginning Polish (Schenker)
Basic Course in Finnish (Lehtinen)
Basic Course in Estonian (Oinas)
Beginning Slovak (Swan, Galova-Lorinc)
Modern Spanish: A Project of the Modern Language Association
Fluent Tibetan

Eleanor Harz Jorden's Japanese: The Spoken Language is, according to Wikipedia, "heavily influenced by the method."
Wikipedia wrote:The text is centered around a sequence of dialogs and grammar drills, which are practiced and memorized, and detailed linguistic analysis of Japanese grammar. Vocabulary is taught in the context of these dialogs, rather than as isolated lists. This approach – dialogs and pattern practice – is heavily influenced by the audio-lingual method (ALM), which has since fallen out of favor, though the text is not strictly speaking an ALM text, providing grammar explanations rather than only memorization, for instance.
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ownerzeff
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Re: Audio lingual language programs

Postby ownerzeff » Thu Oct 01, 2015 6:45 pm

First of all thanks for your replies.

So, which languages are you interested in studying?


For this specific question, right now I am studying Russian and polishing my old forgotten German. For Russian I am mainly using Modern Russian, which I actually came across in one of your detailed replies as I was wandering in the threads of HTLAL , Spoken Russian, and Assimil Russian. To be honest, for a language which is highly inflected and has a lot of exceptions with regards to grammar, it is my opinion that assimil is not enough to get yourself comfortable. I started with assimil and after a while I was so frustrated with the declensions that I stopped using Assimil and tried to hit the language from a different approach. I also tried pimsleur but contrary to the other languages they offer, pimsleur Russian was somewhat did not fit right to me. It was only after this that I found Spoken Russian by Spoken Language Series, and Modern Russian. So far I'm quite satisfied with these two. I also discovered that the best way for me is to get a little bit information about the language first and thereafter apply myself to heavy drills so that I can internalize the language and the so called automaticity occurs.

I know for a fact that, especially after the 2nd World War and during 60s the audio lingual method was really popular due to the effectiveness of the method. However, apart from FSI/DLI and Modern Russian and Speak Dutch (whose audio I have found nowhere except the celtie website where you cannot access it if you are not a registered user), I did not see any other audio lingual programs and thus my question.

The languages I am interested to learn in the mid run are Persian, Latin and most likely dutch. For persian I know that there is an FSI course(on the cover page it is written Spoken Persian), whose audio can be found in Celtie website, but other than that I do not know which courses are good. For dutch there is assimil which is deemed to be one of their best courses and having known German I do not think it will take a lot of effort. For Latin I know that the beginner's Latin by teach yourself is a very good introduction but apart from that I am out of options. And I am really curios if there is an "audio lingual" program which has FSI type drills with accompanying audio for this language.

I just noticed the preamble to the question you submitted here: viewtopic.php?f=19&t=1298 wherein you opened with "Everybody knows about Assimil,FSI,DLI,Teach Yourself etc." and this leaves me wondering how your question above differs from your preamble.


The answer to this question is as I tried to explain above. I know that "audio lingual" FSI type programs work best for me, but I was also curious about the other methods which are not known to a greater extent but are still good and comprehensive. That thread was opened with this aim in the head and this one was opened especially for FSI type audio lingual programs.
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Re: Audio lingual language programs

Postby Elexi » Thu Oct 01, 2015 7:19 pm

For Dutch and Persian there is the old Spoken Language Services books and tapes:

http://pro.spidergraphics.com/spo/spo_S ... B8560D83C6

I have never used it and only know it from Alexander Arguelles review:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TNQFrY ... 9E1CA2C2C0

The nearest thing I know for Latin is Evan der Millner's version of George Adler's 19th century A Practical Grammar of the Latin Language

You can download the book (and the answer key). You can also buy it from Amazon.

https://books.google.co.uk/books/about/ ... gAAAAAYAAJ

Milner's audio of the whole course can be bought here:

https://sites.google.com/site/janualing ... tin-course

Evan der Millner explains his version of the course here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hk-O-vIkeRE
Last edited by Elexi on Thu Oct 01, 2015 7:26 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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MorkTheFiddle
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Re: Audio lingual language programs

Postby MorkTheFiddle » Thu Oct 01, 2015 7:23 pm

ownerzeff wrote:For Latin I know that the beginner's Latin by teach yourself is a very good introduction but apart from that I am out of options. And I am really curios if there is an "audio lingual" program which has FSI type drills with accompanying audio for this language.


First, I know of no FSI type drills for Latin. There is a fellow named Evan der Millner on YouTube who provides a number of lessons and readings in Latin. He has as well a web site with dozens of things. Alas, the website is a bit disorderly, so better perhaps to listen to some of his YouTube bits.

Here is a good start, Millner, where you can discover how much you like his voice and on which you can discover the address for his website. I would take his "philosophy" of learning with a grain of salt (though I myself endorse most of it or even maybe all of it) and just know that his readings are philosophy-free. Note you can subscribe to his YouTube Channel.

Disclaimer: I have not listened to much of his basic Latin reading. I have bought a CD of his readings of Cornelia and of Nepos, which are quite acceptable.

Edit: Er, I see Elexi beat me to the punch about Millner.
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Re: Audio lingual language programs

Postby Serpent » Thu Oct 01, 2015 7:52 pm

One DLI resource you might not know is GLOSS. It's available for plenty of languages and incredibly useful after A2-B1. All lessons come with audio, transcripts and translations (click source at the top).
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Re: Audio lingual language programs

Postby Speakeasy » Fri Oct 02, 2015 2:24 am

Audio-Lingual (broad definition)
Upon reading ownerzeff’s additional comments above, I believe that I now have a better understanding of what he means by “audio-lingual” courses. My initial impression and reply were based on the assumption that any language course that included a component of recorded audio as part of the materials would meet his criteria. Thus, the Cortina Language School courses that were the first to incorporate Thomas Edison’s phonograph cylinders at the dawn of the twentieth century, and every other course having an audio component that has been published since that time, would be an “audio-lingual” course. However, ownerzeff’s additional comments seem to direct the discussion to a very specific definition of the term “audio-lingual” method …

Audio-Lingual (narrow definition)
A simple search of the Internet lead me to the Wikipedia article on “audio-lingual” method: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio-lingual_method In the light of this article, and ownerzeff’s additional comments above, it now seems to me that he is referring what some of us might commonly refer to as the “FSI-Basic style” of courses known for the massive repetition of sentence-pattern drills. Hence the reference to Modern Russian, Spoken Language Services, Beginning Polish, First Year Polish, Beginning Japanese, and the like.

Ownerzeff
Ownerzeff, could you please confirm/correct my revised impression? In any event, working under the assumption that this narrower definition applies, given the list of languages to which you made specific reference, it now seems that the following materials would apply:

Russian
Modern Russian
SLS Spoken Russian
DLI Basic Russian
: In this latter case, obtaining a complete set of the texts and audio recordings is not that evident as there are multiple versions of the DLI Russian courses on the JLU Archives database. Also, depending on the course, at times, the DLI pattern drills were crafted in a deliberately simple fashion so as to focus only on the point of grammar in question, whereas the FSI pattern drills focused on grammar, sentence structure, and development of vocabulary.

Persian (Farsi)
FSI Persian (Farsi): You can locate the combined text and audio files on the Live Lingua Project website. https://www.livelingua.com/fsi-language-courses.php
DLI Basic Persian: From what I have read elsewhere, the DLI Basic Persian course was very comprehensive. Unfortunately, the files available on the JLU Archives database are incomplete.
Modern Persian (Beginning & Intermediate): The University of Michigan published a highly-rated Persian/Farsi course in three levels for which they also offer 18 CDs worth of audio recordings. I do not know how the course is structured and it may not fit your criteria for an “audio-lingual” course. Nonetheless, given the positive reviews, it is worth checking out.
Other Persian courses: I have never come across a civilian variant of FSI-Basic-style Persian course.

Dutch
FSI Basic Dutch: Regrettably, it would appear that the FSI did not publish an FSI-Basic-style Dutch course. Given the lower demand, it might be that they simply sub-contracted the teaching to language schools or universities, but this is speculation on my part.
DLI Basic Dutch: Given that the JLU Archives contain a fairly comprehensive DLI Dutch Refresher course, it is reasonable to assume that a DLI Basic Dutch course once existed. Unfortunately, I have never come across such a course. Having looked at the Refresher course, my impression is that a very solid A2 Level would be a pre-requisite for using it.
Other Dutch courses: I have never come across a civilian variant of FSI-Basic-style Dutch course.

Polish
Beginning Polish (Volumes I and II), by Schenker
First Year Polish, by Swan
Intermediate Polish, by Swan
SLS Spoken Polish: Note carefully that this course is an exact copy of Schenker’s Beginning Polish. Bizarrely, they do, indeed, still provide the audio recordings on cassettes!

Glossika Mass Sentence Files
While NOT a course, the Glossika Mass Sentence files do, indeed, present an “audio-lingual” component to accompany any A2+ Level individual programme.

Assimil Dialogues
Okay, these are NOT sentence-pattern drills. Nonetheless, in my experience, rapidly progressing through a series of Assimil dialogues has an effect similar to that of practicing sentence-pattern drills. But then again, one could make the same comment about any series of dialogues.

Good luck with your studies.
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Speakeasy
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Re: Audio lingual language programs

Postby Speakeasy » Sat Oct 03, 2015 2:26 am

ownerzeff wrote:Are there any other good comprehensive audio lingual language programs such as Modern Russian 1 and 2, or Speak Dutch, except for FSI/DLI?

Ownerzeff, I am somewhat curious about the Speak Dutch course. I tried searching the Internet, but could not find any references to it; that is, I could not locate a Dutch course fitting the definition of "audio-lingual" per the Wikipedia link above. Could you provide some information such as: names of the author and the publisher, the approach to teaching, the number of hours of audio recordings, the estimated level attained upon completion, and where it can be purchased or otherwise located? Also, have you used this course yourself and, if so, what were your impressions?
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ownerzeff
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Re: Audio lingual language programs

Postby ownerzeff » Sun Oct 04, 2015 12:47 pm

It is right here: http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED024029

Unfortunaltey, I have no experience with the book itself. I was just searching for audio lingual books in general in HTLAL and in one of the threads I read it by chance. After that I googled it and found it on eric. I have glanced at it and it is certainly FSI style.

Furthermore, http://www.iu.edu/~celtie/dutch_archive.html, here there is the audio but copyright restrections apply for them so I have no way to open it, since I am not a registered user.

I hope it helps.
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