General Linguaphone Discussion

All about language programs, courses, websites and other learning resources
tractor
Orange Belt
Posts: 143
Joined: Sat Oct 29, 2016 10:58 am
Location: Norway
Languages: Norwegian (N), English, Spanish, Catalan, French, German, Latin
x 219

Re: General Linguaphone Discussion

Postby tractor » Sun Dec 20, 2020 10:11 am

Lysander wrote:It is just strange and I am curious how the combination came to be, especially considering the russet and gold book is in a dust jacket that matches the other books.

I guess the previous owner had an incomplete set and bought the missing parts separately.
0 x

blakroz
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2021 3:42 pm
Languages: English, German

Re: General Linguaphone Discussion

Postby blakroz » Thu Apr 01, 2021 7:58 am

I have a question regarding Linguaphone German 1990 edition. I read somewhere that the audios in this edition are spoken by non-natives and is taught by someone from Canada (who is not a native German) and pronunciations and intonations have errors and it's way different from native German speakers. Is this true?
0 x

User avatar
Faust
White Belt
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun Dec 06, 2020 11:44 pm
Languages: English (N)
x 12

Re: General Linguaphone Discussion

Postby Faust » Sat May 08, 2021 2:27 am

blakroz wrote:I have a question regarding Linguaphone German 1990 edition. I read somewhere that the audios in this edition are spoken by non-natives and is taught by someone from Canada (who is not a native German) and pronunciations and intonations have errors and it's way different from native German speakers. Is this true?

Has anyone ever had luck contacting Linguaphone just to buy the audio of a course?

I found a 90-lesson Greek Linguaphone course on ebay for a reasonable price (just under $35 for the course and shipping.) But caveat emptor! The course came with cassette tapes and not cds.

I did contact Linguaphone to ask if they'd sell their USB drive or cds or an e-download as a standalone. But considering the fat price they charge for the full course, I doubt it.

Anyone ever have any luck using one of those cassette to mp3 recorders? It looks like they can be had for around $30 on Amazon, which will likely end up being the cheapest route....
0 x

David1917
Blue Belt
Posts: 546
Joined: Mon Nov 06, 2017 2:36 am
Location: USA
Languages: English (N)
Professional Level: Spanish, Russian
Current Focus: Chinese, Persian, German, Yiddish, Icelandic, Arabic, Cornish, Japanese
Time Permitting: Hindi, Latin, Old English, Polish, Greek, Hungarian, French
Dreams: Korean, Scandinavian, Slavic, Celtic, Sanskrit
x 1312

Re: General Linguaphone Discussion

Postby David1917 » Sat May 08, 2021 4:21 am

Faust wrote:I did contact Linguaphone to ask if they'd sell their USB drive or cds or an e-download as a standalone. But considering the fat price they charge for the full course, I doubt it.

Anyone ever have any luck using one of those cassette to mp3 recorders? It looks like they can be had for around $30 on Amazon, which will likely end up being the cheapest route....


I have had Linguaphone offer to sell me CDs at 5.95 GBP/each. I've read other users saying that they have been able to get older course materials from them as well, but maybe not all of them and it's case by case.

I ended up with the Linguaphone Arabic set with cassettes off of ebay and I used the tape deck at my uni's library which was plugged into a computer with Reaper and I made audio files. Kind of a fun process to have to sit and listen to the whole course, kind of a pain. There's a chance your local library, or if anyone you know does audio engineering, has a similar apparatus.
1 x

AnthonyLauder
Yellow Belt
Posts: 98
Joined: Wed May 04, 2016 6:29 am
Location: Prague, Czech republic
Languages: English (N), Everything Else (A0)
x 580
Contact:

Re: General Linguaphone Discussion

Postby AnthonyLauder » Tue May 18, 2021 5:37 pm

I have been going over some old linguaphone courses recently, and listening to the digitised recordings made from old gramaphone records. It struck me that the rewind function, to listen to a phrase several times, upon which I rely heavily, must have been extremely challenging with a gramaphone. I just can't imagine how people did it successfully. One of the most important aspects of language learning is repetition, and without a simple and accurate rewind feature, repetition must be severely hampered. I really am full of great admiration for people who used these older courses in their original form.
3 x

lowsocks
White Belt
Posts: 45
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2017 4:00 am
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
Languages: English (N), French (beginner), German (beginner)
x 116

Re: General Linguaphone Discussion

Postby lowsocks » Thu May 20, 2021 9:13 pm

AnthonyLauder wrote:It struck me that the rewind function, to listen to a phrase several times, upon which I rely heavily, must have been extremely challenging with a gramaphone. I just can't imagine how people did it successfully.
I don't know how the average person did it either. But there were some machines specially designed to handle this problem. Here is an account by the late Ken Butler, at one time Director of the "Inter-University Center for Japanese Language Studies" in Tokyo (administered by Stanford University). He is describing how he first leaned Japanese, largely on his own, in 1956 at Yale:

https://web.archive.org/web/20030124165 ... cyber.html
Ken Butler wrote:I also soon found out that the institute had recorded all of the material in the 2-volume "Spoken Japanese" text on special records, and had had a local electronics manufacturer produce a special type of record player which had a foot switch connected to it which when pressed would jump the needle of the record player back one groove. This would allow the user to get a repetition of the sentence the user had just heard. In effect, the machine was designed to do what the native speaker teacher had been trained to do in the classroom in terms of the aural/oral method.

However, the machine was highly inefficient, since usually when you hit the footswitch, the needle would jump back into the middle of the previous sentence, and it required quite a bit of patience to use it. Still, my classroom instruction was not progressing the way I wanted it to, so I determined to use that machine no matter how inefficient it was
So it was possible :)

Btw, the book he used, "Spoken Japanese" (two volumes) by Bernard Bloch and Eleanor Harz Jorden (he misspelled Jorden), was republished after the war for the civilian market, by Henry Holt and Company. Later, in the 1970's, it was reprinted again by Spoken Language Services, Inc. Unfortunately, SLS closed down a few years ago (c. 2017?). You may be able to find second-hand copies, perhaps even an original army manual from the 1940's. But the audio recordings might be almost impossible to find, limiting the book's usefulness, IMO. Unless you happen to have a very patient native speaker willing to help you :)

(He says he also used the same method to study Chinese the following summer, but does not identify the book. But I think it may well have been another book in the same series, "Spoken Chinese" (two volumes), by Charles F. Hockett and Chaoying Fang.)
1 x


Return to “Language Programs and Resources”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests