Smallwhite needs help with English expressions

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golyplot
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Re: Smallwhite needs help with English expressions

Postby golyplot » Tue Sep 01, 2020 8:34 pm

rdearman wrote:I think you'll find that medicos is an Americanism.


Hey, don't pin that on us!
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Re: Smallwhite needs help with English expressions

Postby lavengro » Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:23 pm

golyplot wrote:Strangely, I always considered stomachache to be one word. I'm surprised to see it written as two words here. I would say I've never seen it that way before, but that just invites people to bury with me with responses that "no, that's the standard way things are done across the pond" or whatever.

In Canada (not sure which side of the pond that puts me relative to you), I see both stomachache (which seems wrong to me) and stomach ache, and bellyache and belly ache.

Myself, I avoid the controversy by using the phrase "tummy ache," for a number of reasons:

- to identify what is often a generalized abdominal discomfort as a "stomach ache" (or if you must, a "stomachache") brings a precision that is often unwarranted. The stomach represents only a portion of the abdomen, and I think it is challenging for one to be able to identify any particular abdominal pain or discomfort as being located specifically in the stomach per se as opposed to elsewhere in that goop that constitutes one's innards

- "belly" rhymes with "jelly" and nothing good comes from anything that rhymes with jelly. Other than vermicelli. Due apologies to anyone named Kelly, Shell(e)y, Elly or Nelly - not your fault in getting caught up with the smelly Machiavelli group of bad eggs

- also, I know many who equate "belly" with excess abdominal fat, so that a skinny person can be said not to have a belly (whereas hopefully even skinny folks have a stomach)

- "tummy" - being essentially a childish, nursery sort of word, it is a more comforting term to use when one is in discomfort or distress. "Tummy aches" go away 'cause they are childish minor things and can be best treated by a lollipop or kind, soothing words from a loved one.
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Re: Smallwhite needs help with English expressions

Postby golyplot » Tue Sep 01, 2020 11:01 pm

lavengro wrote:- "tummy" - being essentially a childish, nursery sort of word, it is a more comforting term to use when one is in discomfort or distress. "Tummy aches" go away 'cause they are childish minor things and can be best treated by a lollipop or kind, soothing words from a loved one.


That's exactly why I'd never use it. Complaining about a "tummy ache" makes you sound like a little kid. Anyway, I'm American for whatever that's worth.
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Re: Smallwhite needs help with English expressions

Postby Adrianslont » Wed Sep 02, 2020 3:24 am

rdearman wrote:
DaveAgain wrote:
golyplot wrote:
DaveAgain wrote:Excepting medicos, I think that's probably something that everyone has their own changable rules for.


Huh, I've never seen "medico" used in English before. I had to look it up.
Report to engineering. They will update your software, or recycle you for parts.

I think you'll find that medicos is an Americanism.

I sometimes think we need a reddit style “flair” indicating our variety of English on these threads discussing English usage.

I am familiar with medicos and I speak Australian English. The good thing about Australian English is that it draws heavily on both British and American English. However, we don’t get all of it and there is a time lag on new slang and changes in usage. It’s a long way away.

Regarding “silly wrote” - it sounds playful and quite understandable to me but I have never heard it before. So fun!

I googled it, smallwhite, and got zero returns. I’m sure that there are other examples that follow this pattern but can’t actually think of one at the moment.
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Re: Smallwhite needs help with English expressions

Postby smallwhite » Wed Sep 02, 2020 6:19 pm

Adrianslont wrote:I googled it, smallwhite, and got zero returns. I’m sure that there are other examples that follow this pattern but can’t actually think of one at the moment.

Try: "i just silly" -"am I just silly"

I likely also silly went xxx and silly thought yyy :P

I remember seeing one result from New Zealand, and my English does have remnants of NZ influence from when I was little.

Not differentiating pain in the organ stomach and that in the belly is like not differentiating toothache and headache :P
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Re: Smallwhite needs help with English expressions

Postby smallwhite » Sat Apr 03, 2021 6:49 pm

I was today years old when Quizlet said "inVENtory" to me. I thought I had made a typo. :x
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Re: Smallwhite needs help with English expressions

Postby Le Baron » Sat Apr 03, 2021 8:09 pm

Adrianslont wrote:I am familiar with medicos and I speak Australian English.


It makes sense. 'Medico' seems to follow a common Aussie slang pattern like: 'smoko', 'dero' (derro?), 'arvo' etc.

As you can see from my choices I've watched quite a lot of Prisoner. :D
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Re: Smallwhite needs help with English expressions

Postby IronMike » Sun Apr 04, 2021 1:56 am

smallwhite wrote:I was today years old when Quizlet said "inVENtory" to me. I thought I had made a typo. :x

What in the world? I've NEVER heard it pronounced that way. IN-ven-tory, all the way, for me.
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Re: Smallwhite needs help with English expressions

Postby eido » Sun Apr 04, 2021 1:04 pm

Le Baron wrote:
Adrianslont wrote:I am familiar with medicos and I speak Australian English.


It makes sense. 'Medico' seems to follow a common Aussie slang pattern like: 'smoko', 'dero' (derro?), 'arvo' etc.

As you can see from my choices I've watched quite a lot of Prisoner. :D

I just guessed what it meant because it's similar to the Spanish word for "doctor," médico. American English does that a lot. It takes Spanish words and remixes them into English versions, and I figured this was another. Looks like Google is telling me this particular iteration is from Italian (coming to us in the 17th century, it seems), so close enough.
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Re: Smallwhite needs help with English expressions

Postby Le Baron » Sun Apr 04, 2021 1:32 pm

IronMike wrote:
smallwhite wrote:I was today years old when Quizlet said "inVENtory" to me. I thought I had made a typo. :x

What in the world? I've NEVER heard it pronounced that way. IN-ven-tory, all the way, for me.


Not IN-ven-TORy? The U.S. pronunciation of that word I've heard in films or on the news also stresses that last bit. Although of course the country is huge and regional pronunciations differ.

In Britain it tends to sound more like: 'in-v'n-tri'
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