Dutch phrasing question

Ask specific questions about your target languages. Beginner questions welcome!
WaxPoetic
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri May 28, 2021 12:26 am
Languages: English (N), Dutch (A2), American Sign Language (B2), Japanese (beginner), Spanish (beginner)
x 1

Dutch phrasing question

Postby WaxPoetic » Fri May 28, 2021 12:39 am

Just a quick question for any proficient or native Dutch speakers

If I wanted to express an amount of something plus a small non-specific additional amount -- for example "Two years and a bit." or "50 cats and then some" -- how would it usually be phrased in Dutch?

My brain wants to just phrase it the way I would in English, "een beetje meer" or something like that, but I get the feeling there's a specific Dutch phrase for that sort of thing that I'm not thinking of. Wish there was a way to search concepts instead of just single-word-direct-translation vocabulary. Thanks in advance.
1 x

User avatar
urubu
White Belt
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2016 8:55 pm
Location: Gütersloh (D)
Languages: German (N), Dutch (C2), English, French, Portuguese, Indonesian, Esperanto Studying: Middle Egyptian, Coptic
x 22

Re: Dutch phrasing question

Postby urubu » Fri May 28, 2021 7:32 pm

'Ruim x' would work in those cases (x = twee jaar / vijftig katten).
2 x

User avatar
Le Baron
Blue Belt
Posts: 502
Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2021 5:14 pm
Location: The scullery
Languages: English (N), Nederlands, Français, Deutsch, Esperanto (a very worthy language). Studying: Castellano, Swahili, rather slowly, but surely. Also Sranantongo in the past with my wife, but it has lapsed. Dabbled in: Cantonese, Russian, Norwegian. Finished the Hawaiian course on Duolingo, but can barely remember a thing!
x 1060

Re: Dutch phrasing question

Postby Le Baron » Fri May 28, 2021 8:21 pm

En nog wat (meer).

Ruim, as above, is also perfectly good if you're not specifying, but estimating.

However, if you were talking about a definite number of countable objects, then any more e.g. cats is more than 50 and you should be counting them. The "and then some" in (U.S.) English is more a particle phrase - I'm not a linguist so I don't know the actual definition - than an actual expression of quantity. You can see this in a sentence like: "he gave 100%, and then some!"
2 x

User avatar
Le Baron
Blue Belt
Posts: 502
Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2021 5:14 pm
Location: The scullery
Languages: English (N), Nederlands, Français, Deutsch, Esperanto (a very worthy language). Studying: Castellano, Swahili, rather slowly, but surely. Also Sranantongo in the past with my wife, but it has lapsed. Dabbled in: Cantonese, Russian, Norwegian. Finished the Hawaiian course on Duolingo, but can barely remember a thing!
x 1060

Re: Dutch phrasing question

Postby Le Baron » Sun May 30, 2021 1:52 pm

Something just popped into my head sort of related to this. In Dutch there's a common way of rendering e.g. 'about ten years' as: een jaar of tien. So a sentence like:

Toen ik een jaar of tien was, gingen wij op vakantie naar Denemarken = When I was about ten, we went on holiday to Denmark/We went on holiday to Denmark when I was around ten years old.

(Note: time/manner/place, then inversion of subject-verb for this sense. Whereas in a slightly different sense, comparing it to e.g. a holiday to Spain aged 12, it would probably be: We gingen op vakantie naar Denemarken toen ik een jaar of tien was).

I used to find this a bit odd as giving the option of one year or ten or everything in-between! When it definitely means 'ten years or so'

I don't know if the same exists in German. I would have said something like: so etwa zehn Jahre or etwa zehn Jahre? But I lack fluency.

Any Dutch natives please offer commentary/correction.
2 x


Return to “Practical Questions and Advice”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Dragon27 and 1 guest