Translate "Cherish the Day" to Sanskrit

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Saim
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Re: Translate "Cherish the Day" to Sanskrit

Postby Saim » Sun Apr 25, 2021 8:52 am

verdastelo wrote:That could be because both the Ukrainian and Pakistani census officials don't collect data on second and third languages. So at first glance, the data does seem counterintuitive. Kiev without Russian and Lahore without Urdu.


My point is more that there are bilinguals whose primary language is Russian (or Urdu) and still declare Ukrainian (or Punjabi) as their mother tongue because it is the language of their ethnic identity. I don't think asking about second or third languages would change much -- presumably they would still place Ukrainian/Punjabi first and Russian/Urdu second, even if they're more comfortable in the latter.

I suspect something similar is at play among those who declared Sanskrit as their first language. I am aware that there are a couple of villages in India where Sanskrit has been established as a medium of everyday communication, so I imagine many of the people there would declare Sanskrit as their first language even though it wasn't the primary language of their upbringing and early socialisation. Or perhaps there are other Brahmins or Hindu nationalists who write in Sanskrit for identity reasons. I could be wrong but these efforts to introduce spoken Sanskrit in these villages seem too recent to have produced a properly nativised code that has become the primary variety of a speech community. This 2018 report on the allegedly Sanskrit-speaking village Mattur in Karnataka seems to show children being taught to chant and learning it as a foreign language (would they be taught to say "I am x, she is y" in Sankethi or Kannada?); it doesn't show children using it amongst themselves in their socialisation, nor is it clear if it is even the main medium of instruction in the school.
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Re: Translate "Cherish the Day" to Sanskrit

Postby taghiyea@gmail.com » Sun Apr 25, 2021 3:40 pm

dampingwire wrote: I am looking to get a tattoo in [insert language I don't know] I've never, ever heard of anyone ever getting a tattoo done in a language they don't understand only to later have a native speaker explain to them why it doesn't mean what they think it means.


@dampingwire - Thanks for your note. I wasn't looking for advice on my choice of tattoo. I was looking for a phrase in Sanskrit. If you don't know it, that's absolutely fine.
Last edited by taghiyea@gmail.com on Sun Apr 25, 2021 7:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Translate "Cherish the Day" to Sanskrit

Postby taghiyea@gmail.com » Sun Apr 25, 2021 7:13 pm

verdastelo wrote:
I wish I could help but I cannot even get my declensions right. To make matters worse, I don't think I understand "Carpe Diem". Saim's suggestion makes sense. Unless you really want it, it's better to find an established phrase in Sanskrit.


Thank you. Carpe diem translates as "seize the day".
Would you know if these two options sound like an appropriate alternative? I found these on forums but would like to double check they make sense. Thanks in advance!

one life one chance:
एकं जीवनम्, एकः अवसरः

each breath is a gift:
प्रत्येकश्वासः पारितोषिकमस्ति
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Saim
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Location: Novi Sad
Languages: Native: English (AU)
Advanced fluency: Catalan, Serbian (+heritage), Spanish, Polish
Basic fluency: Hungarian, French, Galician, Asturian
?? (depends on register): Urdu
Intermediate (mostly passive): Hebrew, Punjabi, Russian, Portuguese, Italian, Occitan, Dutch, Turkish, German
Basic/dabbled: lots of Slavic languages, Romanian, Esperanto, Basque, Arabic, Mandarin
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Re: Translate "Cherish the Day" to Sanskrit

Postby Saim » Sun Apr 25, 2021 11:58 pm

Here is an example of someone explaining the meaning of the second phrase in Hindi. Their explanation is, as far as I can tell, the same as the translation you've given.

प्रत्येक श्वासः =हरेक श्वांस, पारितोषिकम्=सब तरह से संतुष्टिदायक, (ईश्वर का) उपहार ,अस्ति =है।


Pratyeka shvaasaha = each breath; paaritoshikam = in every way gratifying, a gift (from God); asti = is.

I do wonder why it's written all together rather than as प्रत्येक श्वासः पारितोषिकम् अस्ति, but I don't know what kind of convention there is for using spaces in Sanskrit written in Devanagari.

As for the first one (ekam jiivanam, ekaha avasaraha), the vocabulary seems to be correct, but I cannot comment on the grammar or the placement of the comma in the middle (I would probably get rid of it for aesthetic reasons alone).
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Re: Translate "Cherish the Day" to Sanskrit

Postby taghiyea@gmail.com » Thu Jun 03, 2021 3:03 pm

Saim wrote:Here is an example of someone explaining the meaning of the second phrase in Hindi. Their explanation is, as far as I can tell, the same as the translation you've given.

प्रत्येक श्वासः =हरेक श्वांस, पारितोषिकम्=सब तरह से संतुष्टिदायक, (ईश्वर का) उपहार ,अस्ति =है।


Pratyeka shvaasaha = each breath; paaritoshikam = in every way gratifying, a gift (from God); asti = is.

I do wonder why it's written all together rather than as प्रत्येक श्वासः पारितोषिकम् अस्ति, but I don't know what kind of convention there is for using spaces in Sanskrit written in Devanagari.

As for the first one (ekam jiivanam, ekaha avasaraha), the vocabulary seems to be correct, but I cannot comment on the grammar or the placement of the comma in the middle (I would probably get rid of it for aesthetic reasons alone).


Thanks Sam, appreciated.
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