Are these English sentences grammarly correct?

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doubtfulautodidact
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Are these English sentences grammarly correct?

Postby doubtfulautodidact » Sun Feb 07, 2021 7:08 pm

"Others will do everything to make you not believing in yourself. It is because neither do they believe in themselves and they just communicate their own mindset, or they just simply do not want you to be better than them."

If the grammar above isn't right, how would it be?
Also, would the sentences sound natural in a live speech (if the grammar is right)?
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Re: Are these English sentences grammarly correct?

Postby Doitsujin » Sun Feb 07, 2021 8:58 pm

I understand the gist of the sentences, but they contain a couple of grammar errors. How about:

"Others will do everything [in their power] to make you not believe in yourself. It's because/[Often,] they don't believe in themselves and want to force their mindsets/[preconceived notions] on you, or they just don't want you to be better than them."

Hopefully, one of our native speakers will chime in and make your original sentences more readable.
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Re: Are these English sentences grammarly correct?

Postby Saim » Sun Feb 07, 2021 10:05 pm

Are these English sentences grammatically correct?

"Others will do everything to make you not believe in yourself. This is because they don't believe in themselves either and they just communicate their own mindset, or they just simply do not want you to be better than them."

If the grammar above isn't right, what should it be?


To "communicate one's mindset" doesn't really exist as a collocation in English.

Here's how I'd rephrase it more naturally:

Some people will do anything they can to make you not believe in yourself. This is because they don't believe in themselves either so they project this onto you, or they simply don't want you to be better than them.
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Re: Are these English sentences grammarly correct?

Postby doubtfulautodidact » Mon Feb 08, 2021 10:29 am

Wow, huge thanks! I guess I should be working on my English skill a lot more.
I like to use English, even for taking self notes because of its simplicity (compared to my mother tongue), however it requires much more learning and practicing to use it correctly, than I originally thought.
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Re: Are these English sentences grammarly correct?

Postby Le Baron » Mon Feb 08, 2021 4:32 pm

Saim wrote:
To "communicate one's mindset" doesn't really exist as a collocation in English.


Of course it does. It may be a rather vague expression, but it's perfectly legitimate.
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Re: Are these English sentences grammarly correct?

Postby Saim » Mon Feb 08, 2021 9:27 pm

Le Baron wrote:
Saim wrote:
To "communicate one's mindset" doesn't really exist as a collocation in English.


Of course it does. It may be a rather vague expression, but it's perfectly legitimate.


I’d never heard it before reading this post and it took me quite a while to parse the meaning. Do you have any citations of its usage?
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Re: Are these English sentences grammarly correct?

Postby Iversen » Mon Feb 08, 2021 9:36 pm

"Communicate one's mindset" gets 6 hits on Google, one from this thread and the others rather weird ones. I think "communicate one's intentions" is OK, but wouldn't adopt the version with anyone's mindset.

By the way, the word "grammarly" also hurts my eyes, but it may have become part and parcel of the language since an American Tech company took that name. But still, it is not one I would use myself. I would use "grammatically" - even if it's longer.
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Re: Are these English sentences grammarly correct?

Postby Le Baron » Tue Feb 09, 2021 12:48 am

Saim wrote:I’d never heard it before reading this post and it took me quite a while to parse the meaning. Do you have any citations of its usage?


English is a rather free language when it comes to expressions. I read the sentence and I knew what it meant. A 'mindset' is a word with known meaning: a rather fixed, rigid attitude of mind. If, when you communicate with other people, you put that mindset forward (as is the wont of such people), you are communicating that mindset. I don't think it's a complicated idea. Or that it really needs googled citations to back up its validity.
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Re: Are these English sentences grammarly correct?

Postby Cainntear » Tue Feb 09, 2021 11:06 pm

Iversen wrote:By the way, the word "grammarly" also hurts my eyes, but it may have become part and parcel of the language since an American Tech company took that name. But still, it is not one I would use myself. I would use "grammatically" - even if it's longer.

Yes, it always rankled with me that a piece of software that's supposed to check your grammar has a grammatically nonsensical name.
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Re: Are these English sentences grammarly correct?

Postby Cainntear » Tue Feb 09, 2021 11:09 pm

Le Baron wrote:English is a rather free language when it comes to expressions. I read the sentence and I knew what it meant. A 'mindset' is a word with known meaning: a rather fixed, rigid attitude of mind. If, when you communicate with other people, you put that mindset forward (as is the wont of such people), you are communicating that mindset. I don't think it's a complicated idea. Or that it really needs googled citations to back up its validity.

Except that "communicate" doesn't imply imposition or projection of that onto others. To "communicate that mindset" is kind of weird to me, but I would take it to me "express, and inform others of, that mindset". I read the sentence and didn't understand it, and had to actively decode what the intended meaning was.

I would go with "they don't believe in themselves and project that onto others".
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