Polski & Italiano (+ Latin) Episode II: StringerBell Strikes Back

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StringerBell
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Re: Polski & Italiano Episode II: StringerBell Strikes Back

Postby StringerBell » Sat Feb 09, 2019 8:58 pm

I always get a kick out of finding words that are common between Italian and Polish.

Today, I discovered that in Polish, the word for pinball is "fliper" and in Italian it's "flipper". The Italian one I've known for awhile because it came up in an episode of That 70s Show. I always thought was a weird thing to call pinball, but Italian has some oddball things like that. :D Then I came across the same word in my Polish novel today. Maybe there was a pinball game called "Flipper" at some point? I've never heard it called this in English.

Also in my novel, I came across this word for sneakers: "adidasy". Does this mean that Polish has turned the brand ADIDAS into a noun for all sneakers?
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Re: Polski & Italiano Episode II: StringerBell Strikes Back

Postby cjareck » Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:16 pm

StringerBell wrote:Today, I discovered that in Polish, the word for pinball is "fliper" and in Italian it's "flipper".

When I was much younger, we used to call it - wrongly -bilard? Bilard is snooker in Polish.
StringerBell wrote:Also in my novel, I came across this word for sneakers: "adidasy". Does this mean that Polish has turned the brand ADIDAS into a noun for all sneakers?

Yes, the same as "pampersy" for all diapers. In the case of sneakers, you may also say it more professionally: "buty sportowe".
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Re: Polski & Italiano Episode II: StringerBell Strikes Back

Postby StringerBell » Sun Feb 10, 2019 4:29 am

I had to look up "snooker" because I wasn't sure what that was. It looks to be a type of British billiards / pool. I don't think we have or use the word snooker in American English; I could be wrong, it's just not something I ever hear. We say either billiards or pool. I think those two terms are interchangeable.

I saw something interesting on the wikipedia entry; apparently electric billiards is an obsolete term for pinball, so maybe you weren't mistaken, after all!
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Re: Polski & Italiano Episode II: StringerBell Strikes Back

Postby MamaPata » Sun Feb 10, 2019 11:16 am

I think snooker/billiards/pool are slightly different games? Though from my perspective, they seem the same!
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Re: Polski & Italiano Episode II: StringerBell Strikes Back

Postby Radioclare » Sun Feb 10, 2019 11:57 am

I'm not really a sporty person so I'd take what I say with a pinch of salt, but I'm pretty sure that at least in the UK they are three similar but different games. When I've played snooker, it's been on a really large table and with colourful balls that carry different points and have to be potted in a set order, so I've always needed someone to explain which colour is supposed to come next. When I've played pool it's seemed easier because the table has been smaller and there were only two types of ball - each player was just aiming to pot his own balls - so I've been less confused about what I was supposed to be doing. I have always been really bad at both games, but I had a boyfriend who used to play when I was at uni :lol:

I've never played billiards but it sounds old-fashioned to me; like I can imagine a aristocratic character in an Agatha Christie novel being murdered in his billiards room!
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Re: Polski & Italiano Episode II: StringerBell Strikes Back

Postby IronMike » Tue Feb 12, 2019 1:53 am

MamaPata wrote:I think snooker/billiards/pool are slightly different games? Though from my perspective, they seem the same!

Definitely different games. At least, snooker and billiards/pool.
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Re: Polski & Italiano Episode II: StringerBell Strikes Back

Postby Daniel N. » Tue Feb 12, 2019 8:38 pm

StringerBell wrote:I always get a kick out of finding words that are common between Italian and Polish.

Today, I discovered that in Polish, the word for pinball is "fliper" and in Italian it's "flipper".

The same is in BCMS, fliper :)
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Re: Polski & Italiano Episode II: StringerBell Strikes Back

Postby StringerBell » Thu Feb 14, 2019 11:46 pm

Wow, I guess the whole non-English speaking world says "flipper"! I wasn't expecting that. :D

Here's another word in common between Polish and Italian that I discovered today: factory

in Polish: fabryka
in Italian: la fabbrica

In English, we have the verb "to fabricate" which seems like it should be related somehow.

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Even though I'm not officially doing any kind of challenge, I have done Polish every single day since Jan 2 for a minimum of 30 minutes (though usually more). I didn't sign up for the 365 challenge because I don't seem to respond well to these kind of challenges (they instill in me a crushing sense of obligation that must be completed at any cost) but I am doing my best to do as much Polish every single day as I can without getting stressed. I've also resumed watching stuff in Italian in the evenings. I know I should do some more reading in Italian, but I'm having a hard time getting started. I'm still waiting for the Italian translation of Diary of a Wimpy Kid to arrive (my original order got cancelled and I had to reorder a different one).

POLISH:

I have been doing about 1 chapter per day in my novel+audiobook. This has been taking up almost the whole time, since I read a section in English, then in Polish a few times. I've only been spending about 1.5 hours per day (on average) on Polish this past week, which feels like it's just not enough time. However, I have drastically less free time at the moment, so I had to cut back a little.

I noticed something interesting while listening to my audiobook. I used to dread losing my place in the text because I knew I'd never find it again. Now, I regularly look away from the text (while listening to the audiobook) to look up a word quickly here and there and I never have any trouble finding my place in the book again. This probably seems insignificant, but for me it feels like a big deal.

I read out loud the first 2 Mikołaj stories (which took 1/2 hour) today. Since I've already read them (silently) intensively, I was familiar with the stories, though some words still tripped me up. It felt surprisingly comfortable to read out loud. I'm sure my pronunciation leaves much to be desired. If I can figure out how to record myself and post it here without too many technical difficulties, I'll post a clip so everyone can have a good laugh :lol: (or even offer some constructive criticism!)

ITALIAN:

I haven't done anymore lessons, but I've been rewatching La Casa de Papel in Italian, this time with Eng subs on. I'm noticing that there were definitely things I missed the first time around without subs, but somehow my brain ignored them so they didn't prevent me from following the plot. Since there's only 2 seasons of this show (~20 episodes?), I'm planning to watch it a 3rd time without the subtitles to see if I pick up on those little things I lost the first time...unless I get sick of the show by then and need to watch something else.

I haven't been doing any more lessons in the grammar book, but I find myself thinking about some of the rules that I encountered in the last chapter. It feels like they're marinating in my brain. I think a better approach for me might be to do a tiny section of a chapter at a time and just sit with it for a while before moving on.
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Re: Polski & Italiano Episode II: StringerBell Strikes Back

Postby cjareck » Fri Feb 15, 2019 6:17 am

StringerBell wrote:In English, we have the verb "to fabricate" which seems like it should be related somehow.

In Polish we have fabrykować which has two meanings = "produce in high quantities" or "to tamper". Only the second meaning is regularly used, especially in the phrase "sfabrykować dowody" = "tamper with evidence."
There is also a noun fabrykacja = "production" but it is rather seldom.
Nevertheless, we normally use "produkować" and "produkcja."
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Re: Polski & Italiano Episode II: StringerBell Strikes Back

Postby StringerBell » Mon Feb 18, 2019 11:41 pm

I just officially signed up for the Output Challenge in both Italian and Polish. At first it was just for Italian, because I need a little kick in the pants to get back into this language (lately I've been watching a lot of TV in Italian but not much else). Then I realized that I've already been doing this challenge for Polish (unofficially) so I might as well make it official. For both languages, I'm going to just be recording myself reading articles and books to improve my accent and doing scriptorium to help some grammar sink in.

At some point I'd like to transition to free writing or journal entries, but I know that's really stressful for me, so I'm trying to not have expectations that I will be doing it.

word in common btw Polish and Italian but in "reverse":
English: piano
Polish: fortepian
Italian: il pianoforte

This is a word I came across more than a year ago in both languages but it wasn't until today that I realized the words are "reversed" in the two languages. I wonder what that's about.

POLISH:

I have only 1 short chapter left of my novel+audiobook. I'm already looking forward to revisiting it in the future after I've done a few other books. It's amazing how much my comprehension of it has improved compared to when I started. Granted, I'm doing a lot to make it as comprehensible as possible...in fact, I probably could have completed half a Super Challenge just with this one book and the number of times I've reread each chapter! I really like the listening+reading combo. Even though I know I'm mentally working, it doesn't feel like work at all.

I've got several children's/YA books to read (with no audiobook and with no English version) but I'm itching to start Dolores Claiborne, solely for the reason I've got the audiobook and can reference the English version using a library copy, but I know it makes more sense to do the children's stuff first. The children's stuff is more challenging, mainly because without reading it in English, I have to do much more work to make sense of what I'm reading. So paradoxically, the adult-level novels are "easier" and the children's stuff is more challenging.

I did another chapter in the Polish Tutor workbook and have changed my mind; I started out liking it a lot, but now I think it sucks. The chapter introducing verb aspects had a total of three examples, which were not even remotely enough to see any kind of pattern when the perfective form is used versus the imperfective form. This topic was one of the main reasons I wanted to use a book to begin with, so I'm really disappointed. Seriously, 3 examples? I guess I'm going to have to try to generate my own examples using RC.

ITALIAN:

Joining the Output Challenge has given me the jolt I was hoping for; I recorded myself reading an Efficacemente article and I used part of it for scriptorium practice. I'm going to ask my husband to give me some feedback on my accent; it's acceptable but I know it can be better.

I've been really enjoying watching TV in Italian. I know I'm not going to improve my listening comprehension much more at this point doing this, and I really should be focusing on other skills, but I'm enjoying it and decided that I don't want to give much weight to things I should be doing in Italian.

My LE who I've been chatting with for over a year disappeared on me. It's disappointing because we clicked really well, but I guess that's life. I'm not sure if I want to find another LE for Italian or just focus on occasionally chit-chatting with my in-laws.
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