Morgana's log

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tiia
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Language Log: viewtopic.php?t=2374
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Re: Morgana's log

Postby tiia » Sat Aug 03, 2019 12:55 pm

Morgana wrote: Shhhhhh, you were supposed to go along with pretending you didn't notice :lol:

:oops:

Morgana wrote:
tiia wrote:However, I noticed that adding the target languages to the log title increased the number of readers.
Indeed. Though, one small correction: it was adding popular target languages to the log title that increased the views. I had had Swedish, and then also Icelandic, as part of my log title for a long time.

I cannot tell the difference, since I put Finnish and Spanish at the same time there. But I noticed that I got more comments when I started Swedish... Maybe because there are not too many people learning it? Or because I was such a beginner, that people were eager to help me. Or maybe I was just asking more questions. I don't know. I never got corrections for my few Spanish posts, but for Swedish I got some, and even a few for Finnish.

Morgana wrote:My purpose in writing the part you quoted here was to express what most language learners are doing and why it makes sense vs. what I have done. Let's consider your case, though: you live in Finland now. I assume at least some of the duration of your learning had been spent with the hope or intent to migrate.

And now generally: most people who have a longterm primary focus on a small(-ish) language are probably planning to use that language at some point because of loved ones, a career, relocation, etc. So it makes sense to learn them. For someone not doing those things it maybe isn't such a great plan. Unless one just really loves the language at all costs. I'm not judging anybody's reasons for learning, just pointing out what tends to be the case with the majority of language learners. They go for big languages, not small ones.

Well although I cannot deny completely that the thought of moving there had been in my mind like some kind of dream, I do think you're making it too easy here. Here I had written what got me into Finnish in the first place. Really I just thought that it's such a crazy and funny language that I have to learn it. And I had a lot of fun learning Finnish, got to know other learners etc. But I also put a lot of effort in these things.
Getting the exchange placement (after 6 years of learning) was an incredibly great opporunity (btw. my faculty had no exchange placement in Finland, but in Sweden and Iceland. If I had not learned Finnish already, Iceland would have been THE choice. But so, I had to get the placement through another faculty.) After the exchange I was certain I would like to move there, because I had been so happy during that time. Anyway, I became pretty unsure as my studies took me way longer than expected. I was not even completely sure, whether I would really stay for more than the three months when I came last summer.
But there was one thing I was always certain about: Finnish would always have its place in my heart and I wouldn't let it got, as it had brought me so much joy already. I sometimes went as far to say (to myself) that although my love life isn't working out at all, I have at least Finnish (and it cannot run away).* :lol:

However, I do understand that in general people learn such exotic or "small" languages often for their partners or because they just ended up living in the country where it's spoken. (But a lot of expats here don't speak any Finnish.) I mean I've met such people here a lot. I agree with you, when it's about the majority of language learners. I just don't think I'm such a good example for that.

---------------------------------------------------------------
Morgana wrote:The day that was August 2nd:
[list][*]Russian, Assimil:[list][*]41st lesson.
[*]Now we’re learning to tell time! Oh my this seems so different from English. Genitives, ordinal numerals, ugh and Russian does that "half-six" thing like the Brits... I always have to do the math when I hear "half-four" or "half-eleven" like why is it so hard to just say "ten-thirty?!" I wanted the time, not a math problem! :lol: :lol:


Here's a spoiler for you for German, one where even I as a native speaker still have to think what time it actually is.
There's half-something. That's easy. But what about quarter to or quarter past? Well... Germans have TWO ways of saying that.

The first and more common one that everybody understands goes like this:
14.00 - Zwei Uhr. (Two o'clock.)
14.15 - Viertel nach zwei. (Quarter past two)
14.30 - Halb drei. (half-three.)
14.45 - Viertel vor drei. (Quarter to three.)

But then there is also the second way, that is only used in some areas in Germany:
14.00 - Zwei Uhr. (Two o'clock.) - same as before
14.15 - Viertel drei. (quarter three)
14.30 - Halb drei. (half-three.) - same as before
14.45 - Dreiviertel drei. (three-quarters three)

Dreiviertel ("three-quarters") sounds still quite logical and is at least not hard to understand. But Viertel [number] (without nach or vor) still makes me trouble. Just think of the problem that the difference between Viertel drei (14.15) and Viertel nach drei (15.15) is a whole hour!
Btw. Germans who use this expressions, always explain it with cake. Having a quarter of a cake, half of the cake three quarters of the cake and well, the full cake. (But.. aren't we eating the cake and it becomes usually less, when time goes on?)



*You know you're a language nerd, when you write with more people learning Finnish and Finns on a (German) dating site, than you have actual dates.
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Morgana
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Postby Morgana » Sat Aug 03, 2019 9:20 pm

Last edited by Morgana on Mon Nov 25, 2019 8:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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cjareck
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Re: Morgana's log

Postby cjareck » Sat Aug 03, 2019 9:35 pm

jeff_lindqvist wrote:We have the same system in the Scandinavian languages, so it will help you since you're into Swedish as well. I can agree that the numbers 10:30 reads most easily as "ten thirty", but if you're looking at a clock face, it's just as logical to view as something related to eleven (and it's getting even closer to eleven while you're looking at it...). Also German has it. Halb elf is half an hour before eleven, i.e. 10:30. We look into the future. :)

We have something similar - you ma say "W pół do jedenastej" ("in half to the eleven"). Of course, there is also a "Dziesiąta trzydzieści" ("ten-thirty").
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Morgana
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Postby Morgana » Sun Aug 04, 2019 4:22 am

Last edited by Morgana on Mon Nov 25, 2019 8:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Morgana
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Postby Morgana » Tue Aug 06, 2019 1:35 am

Last edited by Morgana on Mon Nov 25, 2019 8:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Morgana
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Postby Morgana » Thu Aug 08, 2019 11:05 pm

Last edited by Morgana on Mon Nov 25, 2019 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Morgana
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Postby Morgana » Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:43 am

Last edited by Morgana on Mon Nov 25, 2019 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Morgana
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Postby Morgana » Wed Aug 14, 2019 12:13 am

Last edited by Morgana on Mon Nov 25, 2019 10:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Morgana
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Postby Morgana » Mon Aug 26, 2019 4:36 am

Last edited by Morgana on Mon Nov 25, 2019 10:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Brun Ugle
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Re: Morgana's log

Postby Brun Ugle » Mon Aug 26, 2019 4:53 pm

With the change in title, I seem to have lost your log for almost a month, but now I’ve found it again.

Norwegian has interesting ways of telling time too. In addition to half meaning halfway to the next hour, we also count to the nearest half hour. So you can have 10 minutes to the hour or 10 minutes after the hour, just like in English, but you can also have 10 minutes to the half hour or 10 minutes past the half hour. So 2:30 is half 3 and 2:40 is 10 past half 3. I’d always assumed Swedish did the same thing, but maybe they don’t.
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