Sahmilat's Languages Log (German, Latin, Ancient Greek, whatever)

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Sahmilat
Yellow Belt
Posts: 74
Joined: Sun May 13, 2018 7:37 pm
Location: Texas
Languages: English (native); German (high intermediate), Latin (high intermediate), Ancient Greek (intermediate); French (beginner)
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... =15&t=8812
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Re: Sahmilat's Languages Log (German, French, Latin, Ancient Greek)

Postby Sahmilat » Mon Oct 14, 2019 11:44 pm

MorkTheFiddle wrote:I don't know what your level of Latin is, but if you are thinking about Beeson, and assuming you mean the Latinist Charles Beeson, I will mention Bibliotheca Augustana Medieval Works under latinitas mediaevalis for several works from several centuries.

For Protagoras, I found Nicholas Denyer's entry on Protagoras for the Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics to be helpful: Plato: Protagoras. Denyer offers help with tricky grammar and unclear meanings.

Cheers,
Mork


Denyer is actually the text we are using! I am using and enjoying the commentary.

And thanks for the Bibliotheca Augustana link, I'm definitely interested in reading more medieval and later Latin works. I think the hyper-focus on the "classics" hurts Latin studies (I say this as a classics major, lol).
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MorkTheFiddle
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Languages: English (N). Read (only) French and Spanish. Studying Ancient Greek, aiming for mastery by 2424. Studying a bit of Latin and Japanese. Once studied Old Norse. Dabbled in Catalan, Provençal and Italian.
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 11#p133911
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Re: Sahmilat's Languages Log (German, French, Latin, Ancient Greek)

Postby MorkTheFiddle » Tue Oct 15, 2019 10:23 pm

Sahmilat wrote: I think the hyper-focus on the "classics" hurts Latin studies (I say this as a classics major, lol).
Well, I am not a classics major, but I agree with you. Good luck, at any rate.
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Tu sabes cuando sales pero no sabes cuando regresas.

Sahmilat
Yellow Belt
Posts: 74
Joined: Sun May 13, 2018 7:37 pm
Location: Texas
Languages: English (native); German (high intermediate), Latin (high intermediate), Ancient Greek (intermediate); French (beginner)
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... =15&t=8812
x 157

Re: Sahmilat's Languages Log (German, French, Latin, Ancient Greek)

Postby Sahmilat » Sun Dec 15, 2019 11:55 pm

Another essay deadline coming up, another perfect time to update my log.

German: Next semester starts in about a month and I'll finally be able to get back to a German class. The class is called German Translation, and I hope we'll be able to talk and read a lot in addition to translating. Lately I've been trying to spend a little time each day reading this book I have on Marx. It's pretty high level because it's talking about philosophy, so the going is a little slow and I'm still in the introduction because I have a hard time sitting down for an extended period of time to read. I can still understand almost all of it even if there's a word here or there that I don't know. I have three semesters of undergrad left and I'm going to focus a lot on German in the near future so that I have the option of doing a master's in Germany where I don't have to pay American tuition.

French: Unfortunately, this has completely dropped off the map for me. Probably won't be able to tackle it anytime soon.

Italian?: I needed an easy class for next semester so on a whim I signed up for accelerated first year Italian. I figure my background in Latin will make the vocab pretty easy, and it would be nice to have some limited command of the language if I continue with Classics. Not really a serious undertaking though.

Latin: I'm almost done with my class on Ovid (procrastinating my final essay) and I got to read a pretty good amount of Latin over the semester. My reading on my own has been pretty sporadic, but I did get the Neo-Latin Reader and read the first few selections in it. Once I'm completely done with the semester's obligations I'll probably devote a little more time to leisure reading in Latin, but I'm mostly comfortable with my level, as I can understand almost anything I read without much trouble except for more difficult prose like Cicero.

Ancient Greek: I have a final that I'm planning to take tomorrow that will involve both seen and unseen translation of selections from Plato's Protagoras, which we unfortunately did not finish in class. Once I'm finished with that I'd like to focus on this more, probably second most time after German, but my Greek isn't great and I don't have a ton of easy stuff to read. I'm planning to participate in the Steadman challenge, and hopefully these editions make the literature a little more accessible to me. Definitely will need to read a lot to be as prepared as I'd like for my class next semester, which is apparently going to be Euripides, who I expect to be harder than what I've read so far.

Sanskrit: Yeah, yeah yeah you should focus on only one or two languages and not spread your time too thin because then you won't make much progress. The prospect of learning even a little Sanskrit is too seductive, I can't resist it. I bought Perry's Sanskrit Primer and slowly working through the lessons, putting the exercises in Anki. It's definitely not a perfect textbook, but I did a lot of grammar first in Latin before I started reading very much so maybe once I get over the pain of drilling grammar at the beginning I'll be able to tackle some "intermediate" readers and get some volume of input in. The grammar is also pretty interesting from a comparative standpoint. I just can't overstate how cool I think this language is.
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Sahmilat
Yellow Belt
Posts: 74
Joined: Sun May 13, 2018 7:37 pm
Location: Texas
Languages: English (native); German (high intermediate), Latin (high intermediate), Ancient Greek (intermediate); French (beginner)
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... =15&t=8812
x 157

Re: Sahmilat's Languages Log (German, Latin, Ancient Greek, whatever)

Postby Sahmilat » Sun Jan 12, 2020 6:03 pm

Well, my break is over and I'm headed back to school in a couple of hours. A good time to reflect on what I didn't accomplish over the break and my goals for the semester.

German: I read a little bit of Marx but ended up deciding it was too high level for me. Seems I'm not quite good enough at German to read philosophy, which, in hindsight, shouldn't be particularly surprising. I didn't read much German over the break other than websites and PDFs about masters programs. Heidelberg is looking particularly attractive.
Looking forward to my translation class I have this semester, I just hope that it involves as much German as possible rather than being entirely in English like my Latin and Greek translation classes have been.

Italian: My first Italian class is tomorrow! I decided to go ahead and cop cheap copies of Assimil and Living Language Ultimate, which look like they'll complement one another pretty well. I'm going to try and spend a good amount of time on Italian outside of class as well as in class. The syllabus for the intensive course looks pretty good, there are going to be lots of opportunities for me to speak with native speakers, which is of course the hardest thing about studying on your own.

Latin: I didn't end up reading much more of the Neo-Latin Reader, or really of anything else. I am looking forward to my class on love elegy, I hope we'll get to read a lot. Not much to report on this front.

Ancient Greek: I'm increasingly frustrated with my Greek level. I've been trying to read some of the "easy" public domain readers from archive.org and other places, but there seems to be very little in Greek that I can comfortably read, even if I theoretically know a couple thousand words and have learned a lot of the grammar. This is the struggle of ancient languages I guess, not enough practice really reading. I'm certainly not ready to read Euripides' Medea this semester, but I guess I'll just brute force my way through translating it and accept that I'm going to need like an hour for each page. My self-study will probably be spent using Sidgwick's Introduction to Greek Prose Composition, which will hopefully help me internalize grammar patterns better and teach me to actually write. I can write in Latin but Greek is much harder for me, so for now I'll use the crutch of translating these practice passages from English until I'm ready for free composition.

Sanskrit: Like everything else, I was pretty inconsistently working on this over my break. But that's OK. I'm going to bring my stuff to school with me and try to commit some time every day to working through Perry until I finish it, ideally towards the end of the semester, though I won't die if I don't finish by then. I suspect that at some point I'll get to where I am now with Greek and I'll start to feel like an idiot, except it'll be worse because it's Sanskrit which has an infinite well of vocabulary that you can never master. Or so I hear.

Tentative plan: Try to spend an hour a day on each of these languages, including my classes which are all roughly an hour long (some are 50 minutes, some are 75 minutes). Except maybe Sundays. That means I'll have to schedule my own time to do Italian and German on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, and Latin and Greek on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and Sanskrit every day. During that hour I'll try to get my homework done first and then spend any time left over on self directed study. Of course, this will probably need to be extended beyond an hour in many cases because my homework alone will take too long, but I'll cross that bridge when I get there.
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