French: Fresh, fun native media at my fingertips

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Ani
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Re: French: Fresh, fun native media at my fingertips

Postby Ani » Fri Sep 28, 2018 10:00 pm

DaveAgain wrote:
1. Has Peter Rabbit been mis-filed, or is this truly an edition for ancient egyptiens?


It totally says "Heiroglyph edition" on the spine. Good catch. Now I want it :lol:
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But there's no sense crying over every mistake. You just keep on trying till you run out of cake.

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Fortheo
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Re: French: Fresh, fun native media at my fingertips

Postby Fortheo » Sat Sep 29, 2018 8:33 am

I've been meaning to read those Bernard werber books for a while now. Did you like them? I asked my Belgian friend for French authors similar to Stephen king and she recommended me Bernard werber.

I'll end up reading his books either way, but I'm still curious to know what you thought of his books.

Also, your shelf gave me some BD recommendations. Thanks ;)
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emk
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Re: French: Fresh, fun native media at my fingertips

Postby emk » Sat Sep 29, 2018 11:55 am

DaveAgain wrote:1. Has Peter Rabbit been mis-filed, or is this truly an edition for ancient egyptiens?

Yes! It's an actual hieroglyphic edition, translated into Middle Egyptian. You can buy it online from the British Museum Press. The interior is absolutely gorgeous, and the pages are high quality.

I actually read through this page-by-page, and attempted to translate it the best I could, taking notes. It was way too hard for me, but I had fun! Here's an excerpt from my notes:

## Page 7

H: wn:n | p-w | s-X:a-t:E34 | n:D-s-t:G37 | 1*1*1*1 | ir:W | r:n:3 | s-n:3
L: wn | pw | sXa.t | nDs.t | 4 | ir.w | rn.w | sn
G: be.PCLE | PCLE | hare-FSG | little-FSG | 4 | make-PASS.3PL | name.MPL | 3PL
T: (There were?) four little hares named

I don't really understand {wn pw}, and there are no especially helpful
examples in a [corpus search][wnpw]. "Hare" and "little" are singular but
followed by a number, which is apparently how this works.

[wnpw]: http://aaew.bbaw.de/tla/servlet/s0?f=0& ... d3=1&d4=10

H: m | f:E23-wA-p:z-i-i-B1 | m-wA-p:z-i-i-B1
L: m | flopsy | mopsy
G: in.PCLE | Flopsy | Mopsy
T: were Flopsy, Mopsy

Here, the preposition {m} means something like "is." The names are
transliterated using using a [scribal convention for foreign
words][foreign]. (Or [try this site][foreign2], which actually seems quite
accurate.)

[foreign]: http://www.jimloy.com/hiero/yourname.htm
[foreign2]: http://www.amyallcock.com/projects/hieroglyphs/main.php


DaveAgain wrote:2. My tailor is rich - is that a history of the Assimil company?

Yes. I posted a review on the old forum. It's a pretty interesting biography of Alphonse Chérel, his experiences during World War II, his personal language learning methodology, and his goals for Assimil. Despite the English title, the book is in French. You can still find used copies on Amazon.fr, but I don't see it on Assimil's own website any more. And I don't think it's worth 45€.

DaveAgain wrote:3. English as a f* second language - is that a course for coarsening your discourse?

Yeah, it's basically a dictionary and grammar of English-language profanity, aimed at people learning English. As such books go, it's reasonably decent—it explains common idioms, and probably about 80% of the profanity was familiar to me as a native speaker from the northeastern US. It's available on Amazon.

I was less impressed by Hide This French Book (also on the shelf) which attempts to teach vulgar French. This contained a sampling of French vulgarity, but I read and watch plenty of trashy French media, and a lot of the choices seemed older, or slightly "off" (certainly if used by a foreign speaker).

Now, I really do think that intermediate students should learn common profanity. If nothing else, it helps you understand why you must be very careful about the pronunciation of cou /ku/ versus cul /ky/, and it helps you to avoid falling for juvenile jokes like T'habites à combien de kilomètres de Tours ? But I think the best way to learn profanity is from native media (or from casual conversation, if you hang out with native speakers who swear a lot).

Ani wrote:It totally says "Heiroglyph edition" on the spine. Good catch. Now I want it :lol:

Yes, yes you do. It's only 7€ plus shipping, and it's the perfect gift for any language lover. :lol:

Fortheo wrote:I've been meaning to read those Bernard werber books for a while now. Did you like them? I asked my Belgian friend for French authors similar to Stephen king and she recommended me Bernard werber.

Werber writes science fiction, and he's fairly popular in France. Personally, I think he's more likely to appeal to people haven't read much science fiction. If you're a fan of SF, then you'll probably guess most of his plot twists by page 2. Personally, reading a Werber book feels sort of like reading a locked room mystery where the butler did it. The writing is fine, but there's no surprise. This is less of a problem for people who don't read a lot of SF, obviously.

One exception to this is Les Fourmis, which is one of his most famous books. I've read about half of it, and it was more surprising and original. Also, it's fairly creepy, so if you're a Stephen King fan, it might be a good place to start?

Fortheo wrote:Also, your shelf gave me some BD recommendations. Thanks ;)

For BD recommendatioins, you might also enjoy my pages on SensCritique.
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