tak sadar aku dirayu setan

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jeff_lindqvist
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Re: tak sadar aku dirayu setan

Postby jeff_lindqvist » Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:47 pm

Thanks for reminding me of this language - it's on my hit list (martial arts reasons).
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Axon
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Re: tak sadar aku dirayu setan

Postby Axon » Fri Nov 17, 2017 3:24 am

Be careful about making up your own pattern drills - the prefixes add layers of meaning in ways that I've never seen in other languages. Of course, these prefixes are largely skipped over in the spoken language, but still.

basah - wet, moist, damp

membasahkan - to make something wet all at once, like spilling a drink on something

membasahi - to make something wet over time, like rain wetting the earth

My teachers presented meN-kan and meN-i as having lots of overlapping meaning, and they do, but it was only after forcing them to come up with specific examples that this instantaneous/gradual aspect became clear to me.
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Adrianslont
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Re: tak sadar aku dirayu setan

Postby Adrianslont » Fri Nov 17, 2017 9:12 pm

Axon wrote:Be careful about making up your own pattern drills - the prefixes add layers of meaning in ways that I've never seen in other languages. Of course, these prefixes are largely skipped over in the spoken language, but still.

basah - wet, moist, damp

membasahkan - to make something wet all at once, like spilling a drink on something

membasahi - to make something wet over time, like rain wetting the earth

My teachers presented meN-kan and meN-i as having lots of overlapping meaning, and they do, but it was only after forcing them to come up with specific examples that this instantaneous/gradual aspect became clear to me.


This page seems to give a nice overview of the affixes. I have started to read it many times and never got to the end. I just go ahead and don’t use many of them - like many of the locals! Or use them with partial understanding. I should
Probably have higher aspirations!

http://indodic.com/affixeng.html

It makes me laugh/annoyed when people say Indonesian has no grammar!
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Xmmm
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Re: tak sadar aku dirayu setan

Postby Xmmm » Tue Nov 28, 2017 10:03 pm

As I close in on the 100 hour mark learning Indonesian, I'm not sure it's going to escape the fate of my other L4 attempts in Norwegian, Turkish, and Esperanto.

I'm starting to experience "resource asphyxiation." Indonesian is straightforward enough that with my current vocabulary of 1300 words, if I watch a historical film (no slang) my comprehension is in the 10-15% range. Which is phenomenal and encouraging (similar to Italian, much better than Russian at the same stage), except ... Indonesian films don't seem to be very good. Of the fourteen films I've managed to finish, probably the best three were all by Joshua Oppenheimer. And while he appears to be fluent in Indonesian, he's actually British (or so says Wikipedia) so his films don't represent Indonesian cinema at all.

When it comes to books, I don't have a big enough vocabulary to read yet. But when I do, it seems like my options will be Agatha Christie (whom I scrupulously avoid in English, Russian and Italian. Raymond Chandler wrote an essay about what's wrong with Agatha Christie and I agree 100%) and even worse, romance novels.

I'm trying not to give up ... yet. But after the 6 week challenge I will probably fall back to building vocabulary 10 words a day while I decide if this language is a go or a no go. I know good novels exist at least ... maybe I need to head to a university library or something ...

I'm a complete dilettante in terms of languages, it's clear. I'm not looking for a job in Indonesia or a date in Indonesia or even to take a long vacation in Indonesia. If I'm going to learn a language, I have to be entertained. And Russian (for all the pain it causes me) is infinitely more entertaining. And Italian has the double advantage of being entertaining and not too painful. Sighs as he watches Arguelles' "Six Languages" fade into the distance.
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DaveBee
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Re: tak sadar aku dirayu setan

Postby DaveBee » Wed Nov 29, 2017 12:14 am

Xmmm wrote:When it comes to books, I don't have a big enough vocabulary to read yet. But when I do, it seems like my options will be Agatha Christie (whom I scrupulously avoid in English, Russian and Italian. Raymond Chandler wrote an essay about what's wrong with Agatha Christie and I agree 100%) and even worse, romance novels.
I have vague memories of an Agatha Christie phase. As I recall the murderer was usually the person who couldn't have done it, then in the big showdown their alibi was show to be false.

What about Conan Doyle? Beyond the Sherlock Holmes stories his Brigadier Gerard, and Professor Challenger ones are pretty funny. Jules Verne is widely translated and readable, if a bit prone to lists.

Professor Arguilles published a "great books" list that might spark some ideas.

http://foreignlanguageexpertise.com/great_books.html

I'm not familiar with the Dutch ones, but wouldn't they be likely to be available in Indonesian?
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Xmmm
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Re: tak sadar aku dirayu setan

Postby Xmmm » Wed Nov 29, 2017 1:13 am

DaveBee wrote:
Xmmm wrote:When it comes to books, I don't have a big enough vocabulary to read yet. But when I do, it seems like my options will be Agatha Christie (whom I scrupulously avoid in English, Russian and Italian. Raymond Chandler wrote an essay about what's wrong with Agatha Christie and I agree 100%) and even worse, romance novels.
I have vague memories of an Agatha Christie phase. As I recall the murderer was usually the person who couldn't have done it, then in the big showdown their alibi was show to be false.

What about Conan Doyle? Beyond the Sherlock Holmes stories his Brigadier Gerard, and Professor Challenger ones are pretty funny. Jules Verne is widely translated and readable, if a bit prone to lists.

Professor Arguilles published a "great books" list that might spark some ideas.

http://foreignlanguageexpertise.com/great_books.html

I'm not familiar with the Dutch ones, but wouldn't they be likely to be available in Indonesian?


You'd be surprised. There's nothing at Project Gutenberg, or at Librivox. Amazon has not much. No good modern Indonesian novels seem to be available on Kindle, Indonesian bookstores don't ship out of the country, etc.

That being said, I suppose I'm being lazy. I did find Around the World in 80 Days here just now.

I live near a couple of major universities. I should just get a couple rolls of quarters and spend an afternoon photocopying ...
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Ещё раз сунешь голову туда — окажешься внутри. Поняла, Фемида? -- аигел


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