Overscore's log

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overscore
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Re: Overscore's log

Postby overscore » Mon May 20, 2019 10:47 pm

Serbian

Up to 43 cards in my SRS deck. Reading my book, Путин, something like 3 pages in now.
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overscore
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Re: Overscore's log

Postby overscore » Tue May 21, 2019 5:08 pm

Serbian

Read another page-and-half-ish. up to page 11 now. some SRS cards and random wikipedia reading.
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overscore
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Re: Overscore's log

Postby overscore » Fri May 24, 2019 6:06 pm

Serbian

Completed SRS reviews. Random wikipedia reading, random reading the Mint Linux manual for easy sentences. I am bumping into ijekavican differences. My first contact with this challenge.
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overscore
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Re: Overscore's log

Postby overscore » Mon May 27, 2019 3:50 pm

Serbian

Completed SRS. I added around 10 cards. I'm having some trouble with the R sometimes. All the languages I speak (fr,en,de) are among the few without an alveolar trill, so it is quite unnatural for me in many contexts. For example, the word 'rt' (a cape, promontory). I'm wondering if just using the uvular trill is okay. I don't mind having a slight accent actually, so long as I make sense. In most context I can tap the R just fine, but that doesn't work when the R has a phonetic value.

Learned a verbal form, something like 'mi smo bili tražili' – we were looking for – from context alone. Not too worried about learning all the grammar just yet.
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overscore
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Re: Overscore's log

Postby overscore » Tue May 28, 2019 10:34 pm

Serbian

Did my SRS reviews. I am up to 80 cards in the deck now.
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Daniel N.
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Re: Overscore's log

Postby Daniel N. » Wed Jun 05, 2019 9:30 pm

overscore wrote:Serbian
Learned a verbal form, something like 'mi smo bili tražili' – we were looking for – from context alone. Not too worried about learning all the grammar just yet.

This is the pluperfect tense, it's not much used. About the /r/, you'll be understood even if your pronunciation is not exactly native.
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Check Easy Croatian (very useful for Bosnian, Montenegrin and Serbian as well)

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Glossy
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Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... =15&t=7920
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Re: Overscore's log

Postby Glossy » Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:23 pm

overscore wrote:Serbian

I'm having some trouble with the R sometimes. All the languages I speak (fr,en,de) are among the few without an alveolar trill, so it is quite unnatural for me in many contexts. For example, the word 'rt' (a cape, promontory). I'm wondering if just using the uvular trill is okay. I don't mind having a slight accent actually, so long as I make sense.


A certain share of native Russian speakers - maybe 5% - can’t pronounce the alveolar trill. Russian has a special word for this inability - картавить. It’s sometimes made fun of, sometimes considered cute. The French are sometimes called картавые. Since the invention of sound recording the only Russian leader who had trouble with that sound was Lenin.

I don’t remember hearing any native Spanish speakers mispronounce the r. I know Puerto Rico is sometimes Puelto Rico, but that’s a local accent, not a minority’s inability to pronounce that sound. Maybe I haven’t heard enough Spanish to notice all the people who mispronounce it. I can imagine this being a global phenomenon.
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Beam
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Re: Overscore's log

Postby Beam » Sat Jun 15, 2019 9:28 pm

You may find some handy and interesting topics on http://www.serbiancourses.com.
There are many blogs, free courses, Serbian Cyrillic Alphabet, and I think that there is more interesting things to discover.
I've looked for something that would help me with Serbian Cyrillic Alphabet and I've finally found it on their Basic Cyrillic Course https://www.serbiancourses.com/serbian-cyrillic-alphabet/ that looks good and easy to memorize.
And, I've just discovered that there are some vocabulary pages! :)
Cheers! :)
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overscore
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Re: Overscore's log

Postby overscore » Sat Jul 20, 2019 5:19 pm

Glossy wrote:
overscore wrote:Serbian

I'm having some trouble with the R sometimes. All the languages I speak (fr,en,de) are among the few without an alveolar trill, so it is quite unnatural for me in many contexts. For example, the word 'rt' (a cape, promontory). I'm wondering if just using the uvular trill is okay. I don't mind having a slight accent actually, so long as I make sense.


A certain share of native Russian speakers - maybe 5% - can’t pronounce the alveolar trill. Russian has a special word for this inability - картавить. It’s sometimes made fun of, sometimes considered cute. The French are sometimes called картавые. Since the invention of sound recording the only Russian leader who had trouble with that sound was Lenin.

I don’t remember hearing any native Spanish speakers mispronounce the r. I know Puerto Rico is sometimes Puelto Rico, but that’s a local accent, not a minority’s inability to pronounce that sound. Maybe I haven’t heard enough Spanish to notice all the people who mispronounce it. I can imagine this being a global phenomenon.



Thanks for the term

Code: Select all

картавить
i will look into it :D. By any chance is the etymology from "kartvelian"??
I call the Georgians potatoes since it sounds something like kartoffelian .



Serbian

I've been working my butt off every day since the last update to continue my learning. Went over a short documentary Mađarska Revolucija 1956. godine and looked up every single word of it and made a double language version in a LibreOffice document. Actually I'm only about 2/3 of the way done, it's not complete yet.

My cards are very visual in nature, and all come from material made by natives, for natives. the majority of them have pictures or screen captures to keep me interested, like a kid reading the books with pictures.

I've found a magazine i like, Политикин Забавник its pretty cool. their slogan –
za sve od 7 do 107! – for all from 7 to 107
. it used to be 77, but one day a reader turned 78 and wrote in asking if he's still fit to read it and they fixed it.

I've started reading more cyrillic because the latin version of texts feels like a terrible hack, plus all the physical sources here are in cyrillic anyway. I'm still pretty slow at it, when i get tired i revert back to latin (Wikipedia can be switched back and forth between the two official scripts).

Due to the dysmal situation of serbian dictionaries i've decided to just use the excellent Hrvatski jezični portal, being careful to check if i'm suspecting they are using made up fake words.

nema effect

this is just how i call it, but to give an example.

Code: Select all

(en) There is an alternative. There is no alternative.

Code: Select all

(sr) Постоји алтернатива. Нема алтернатив[b]е[/b].


as you can see in serbian the verb is different depending on the sign of the sentence. negative one uses nema, positive one is postoji. the opposite of nemati is imati. i'm not sure if it is used in my little example here instead of postoji.

anyway, it was a bit funny today since exactly after learning this bit of grammar, I went outside to run errands and in the elevator i kinda rushed out to exit, but the elevator stopped at another floor (спрат) to pick someone up, so we kinda bumped into each other, and i go back in the elevator a bit embarrassed.

– Аа, други спрат. (aa, its second floor)
Нема индикације. (there's no indicator) *he points at the top of the elevator's door*


so that was pretty cool that i understood the situation and also noticed the correct case ending.
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overscore
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Posts: 138
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Re: Overscore's log

Postby overscore » Mon Jul 29, 2019 1:08 am

the road is though right now, motivation is at a low and i spend too much in negative mood complaining about pointless things online.

alienated
I got a new edition of the Zabavnik. Keeping up with the SRS cards every day. Spending a lot of time lately wondering why I'm in Serbia and if I can fit in. I'm going back home in a month for a short trip.
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