Expug's 2017 Log - It's now and forever

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Re: Expug's 2017 Log - It's now and forever

Postby Expugnator » Thu Mar 09, 2017 8:58 pm

Started the audiobook Hjelpemannen. It's more like the audio extracted from a TV film than an audiobook proper. It's only dialogues and sound effects, no narration. That has made it good practice. My understanding isn't complete but I like it when I can understand a couple of dialogues in a row. It will be a short experience, after all. In a week or two I'll be done with this and the other folder of sound files in the same format.

I finished another book from my daily 20-page reading slot of priority readings in whatever language is accessible. This one was in Italian, the next one from the same author could be found only in English. So that will be a refreshment from Italian. I'm almost done with the books of this author and then the other authors might have stuff in French or Spanish. I'm really looking forward to read more pages in other languages. As for one of the other priority authors, I'm reading one of his books in German, 10 pages a day, which is pretty much slow, but once I'm done with that one I'm going to have other books of his in Spanish, French and Italian as well.

At Narnia, I learned a nice idiom, 好景不长/Hǎojǐng bù cháng. In Portuguese, o que é bom dura pouco.

Now it's becoming easy to read Georgian also in the longer narrative or descriptive dialogues. I'm no longer hungry for dialogues. This is another stage in reading progress I've learned to recognize through my studies.

Started reading Paddington 4:50 in Estonian. From the first page I could notice that this is going to be a much lighter read.

"Avoir beau" and "quitte à" were two expressions I had trouble with throughout the intermediate stage. Now they are crystal-clear, thanks to Grammaire Progressive.

Almost there with "Le nouveau espagnol sans peine". As I do (mentally) the exercises, I start to get rid of the French influence which affects specifically the Assimil lessons and I gravitate more towards a portuñol or even a clean castellano. I think my initial reaction, given the French base of the course and the fear of portuñol, was to exaggerate the differences between Spanish and Portuguese - especially grammar - and calque more on French. I think for any similar/transparent language we keep doing this calibration in its grammar and vocabulary till all that is left is fine-tuning some unique aspects of the newly added cognate language. Anyway, two more study days with LNESP, then I'll try the newest L'espagnol, then Using Spanish and then native materials, while keeping doing business-aimed coursebooks and other advanced resources. I don't know which pace I'm going to follow for Using Spanish. If I'm not mistaken, I managed 3-4 lessons a day for Perfectionnement Italien, so I can probably do the same with Spanish, and that will mean finishing it in one month instead of four, which is what I need now as a shortcut to my goals. Courses should work for me, not me for them. And that doesn't mean I don't learn grammar properly, on the contrary.

I had a appointment in the middle of the afternoon which actually didn't take place but I wasn't warned of that, so 1 hour wasted and no Clozemaster or any more series after L'espagnol sans peine'.

The Russian group for Brazilian learners on Whatsapp is becoming more active. There is a guy there who encourages everyone to talk, there are some natives hanging around. Way to go!
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Re: Expug's 2017 Log - It's now and forever

Postby Expugnator » Fri Mar 10, 2017 8:40 pm

Has anyone watched the Norwegian show "Singelklubben"? It's available worldwide.

Things are slowly falling into place with regards to Russian. I don't have to pause when listening to the Assimil lessons, which means I know most of the words.

Chinese reading starts to make more sense as well. I can follow larger portions of the story. Narnia is suitable for learning because each volume is short, they don't get longer and longer as with Harry Potter. I'm more than halfway through book 3. I just find the vocabulary a bit too specific, but other than that it's fun, though sometimes I could have been reading more easily from one of Dan Brown's novels. I'm reading The Lost Symbol in Greek (oer at least trying to), but may be next Dan Brown's book will be in Chinese again like the previous ones. I need an author similar to Dan Brown that doesn't involve crime or serial-killing novels. Or why not go for native authors? There is a Chinese book club on reddit with cool suggestions.

Just ran into the Norwegian word 'erindre', cognate with the German 'erinnern'. It isn't used as often, is it? I hear 'huske' almost universally.

Yabla today featured a children's song. There were many verses, so I considered the activity valid. If there are only 2 or 3 verses and the song is short, I'll probably do more than 1 per day.

I'm loving the audiobook 'Grit'. Every language learner should read it, they'll learn much more than in those manuals based in vain and ephemeral promises of quick fluency. I've long realized that grit is not my critical skill; I have rather trouble starting what I need to do. Once it's fit into a routine, once I can split it into smaller tasks, then it becomes operational and I can apply grit to it. The problem is making the transition from the creative idea to its hundred of small operational steps.

I can practically read German extensively and follow the non-fiction book and get the points the author mean, but reading extensively also means not looking up and learning new words. Still, it's nice to notice the progress that has been made. As for the listening, I need to keep practicing as I'm depending too much on subtitles at this point.

Accomplished Language Textbook: Métode de Grec Moderne vol. 1

Image

It's been a while since I was so excited about writing on a textbook I finished. This one, Méthode de Grec Moderne, by L'Asiathèque, is among my favorite ones. It's a mix of grammar-translation, conversation and some sort of aural drills that happen by switching key words around the same topic. The way vocabulary is repeated in the upcoming lessons also reminds of Assimil. It's taken the best of most learning methods, and yet I only recommend it for a false beginner, who is somewhere in the A2 range, the way I am now, after 1 year of Greek. Not all books by L'Asiathèque are like this, most are less self-learner-friendly, but this one is a certain recommendation.

Now it's time to choose what to do next. I'm still dependent on textbooks, and I don't have time for starting native materials right now, not extensively (I do use them occasionally). I have greekpod101 which has grammar and short dialogues, but it still doesn't feel like 'textbook study' and I'd like to pair it with something more consistent. I don't think it's worth trying pre-reform books such as Cortina, DLI or FSI. Most other textbooks are starting to look dull. I'll stick to 'Learn Greek Without a Teacher', which is also available in Spanish and Russian (what else, I wonder) and has audio.

I spent most of the afternoon at the waiting room of the eye doctor's office, so I scheduled my reading activities to be done there. I did them rather quickly because I could focus, and then there were textbook+audio tasks left which I couldn't do from there. I decided not to add an extra burden of audiobook listening because I already do enough in my commutes and lunch break, so I just read a bit from the book The Polyglot Project and remained quiet for the remaining hours. Btw, it's ok with my right eye.

So I did catch up and finish all learning tasks. I just wasn't in the mood for Clozemaster, which would take all the remaining minutes. I tried doing it at the doctor's office, but my connection was unstable there.
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Re: Expug's 2017 Log - It's now and forever

Postby Expugnator » Mon Mar 13, 2017 8:59 pm

FInished the two short excerpts by Lars Saabye Christensen (sorry, it wasn't Jo Nesbø). Today's one was Liset på Yttersida. Only two characters, so it was easier to follow. Sometimes I have the impression Norwegian directors like to contrast characters by accent, for example, in a couple. The guy here says 'ikkje' and the woman speaks typical Osloan accent. I've also seen similar in Side om Side, with Jonas and Maria (an even more extreme example as they both had very unique dialects). The earphones I'm using aren't so loud, so I think this suboptimal listening is doing great for my Norwegian, Italian, English and French.

I don't know if it's due to good sleep, but today I could focus better at Chinese listening-reading. I still miss some keywords that would allow me to actually know who did what to whom, at least in real time, but I think I know most of the vocabulary.

I saw an ad of the film Médecin de campagne on my phone. Sounds interesting, like a mix of Intouchables and La Famille Bélier. It has François Cluzet starring, just like Intouchables.

On reading and unusual word order

At one point in my studies, I thought Russian would catch up with Georgian. I started Russian 10 months after Georgian, and it is reputed to have better learning materials, and to be closer to my native and my stronger languages. Well, after over 4 years I can say that it's rather Georgian that is catching up with German, my next stronger languages. I'm reaching a point at Georgian where only a few word lookups per page separate me from reading extensively. Well, I've reached this point in German several months ago, but why am I not reading extensively in German yet? I try, but I'm still unhappy about my level of comprehension. I feel that, even though I can follow the story, I miss too many important and beautiful words I could be training the meaning of, if I had the dictionary.

Then when it comes to intensive reading I do parallel instead of looking up individual words. They're not the same exercise. While reading in parallel and only missing a few of words, the eye flips so fast from the L2 to L1 text, looking for the unknown words that will promptly allow for meaning and for the sequence of the reading, that there is not enough time to process the so-far unknown word with its meaning in a learnable rhythm. So I only get flashes of these unknown words, because once I've read the translation of the full sentence in my L1 that individual word will no longer be necessary. I read pretty quickly in my L1 and English or French.

There's also the aggravation that in languages with uncommon word order, especially the unusual word order for subordinate clauses in German and Georgian (and Estonian), processing long sentences with unknown words is impractical. The minute you look up the unknown word, even if just one, you have lost thread of the sentence. Going back and re-reading takes much less time than just glancing at the translation. That's why it still feel so tiresome to read intensively in German and Georgian, at least several pages in a row. I did take 1-page sessions and it helped a lot. That's what I've been doing with Estonian from the beginning and it's a language where I've progressed more quickly than in Georgian, for instance, but it's still early for me to envisage reading extensively in it so I have to wait before I realize if 1 page a day more intensively (Estonian) was a more efficient approach than 4 pages a day parallel/almost extensively (Georgian).

Greek. Started the new textbook. Seems useful. I hope to consolidate my knowledge at least in terms of grammar. What I need now is the vocabulary to be able to start listening-reading in the language in a productive way, but that might come only after doing my 2nd Assimil or Language Transfer. This new textbook is 'Learn Greek without a Teacher', and the same content is also available in Russian and Spanish. What I don't like about the audio is that they recorded the words from the wordlists instead of the sample sentences, which would have been more useful. I like the exercises. Fill-in-the-blanks and translation both into TL and from TL. That will force me to activate my skills and learn to spell.

The lessons from Greekpod101 (lowerintermediate) start to get more challenging. The dialogues use more advanced vocabulary, even if they are back into the normal length now. I hope to make progress.

Accomplished language textbook: Le nouvel espagnol sans peine

Image

So it is. A typical 'nouveau'-generation Assimil. Just not so exaggerated with notes. The final lessons are actual grammar explanations in disguise of graded reading. The author seems utterly obsessed with the subgroups of irregular verbs, as if it were the windmill to kill for learners coming from a Romance background. I have the impression the book would be quite hard coming outside of a Romance or, in my case, an Iberian background.

I read the wordlists with typical words from different Latin American countries, and I could recognize some Central American and Colombian words from my Papiamento reads, like candela and televidente.

Now it's time for 'Espagnol', the most up-to-date edition. I'm looking forward to interesting cultural notes.

So I gave German audiobooks another try. Still not for me. I don't have any Norwegian ones lined up right now, so let it be Italian again. My choices will only increase after I add Spanish to the mix.
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Re: Expug's 2017 Log - It's now and forever

Postby Expugnator » Tue Mar 14, 2017 9:48 pm

This morning I faced a dilemma. I started an audiobook by Jo Nesbø, but I thought my comprehension was rather low. Eventually, it got better, but I missed a lot of details, and the novel does seem interesting.I said I'd do Italian but yesterday evening I had time for picking new books.

I wonder if I should read some pages of the novel in Portuguese. I'll do the following: if I have time later today, I'm going to read at least the first two chapters in Portuguese so that I know all the details (I don't have the Norwegian text, only audiobook).

Anyway, that search and the availability of the book in so many languages reminded me I should search for Jo Nesbø's audiobook in Mandarin. I found one, Snowman. I think I haven't read it before, so it's going to be quite fun.

Today's Grit chapter was about deliberate practice. I remember hearing about it at the forum, though vaguely. It can really make the difference between just doing a lot of stuff in the TL year after year and finally seeing progress. For this, it might be better to check the original source, Anders Ericsson. His first book was "The make of an expert", the last one is "Peak practice". I could only find the latter, will keep searching, though the latter does seem more layman-friendly.

I don't know if you guys used to follow the Esperanto portal lernu. It was completely renewed, but following a trend present in Language Transfer and which I complained about here before, they ditched the succesful old courses like Ana Pana. I wonder how they come to the conclusion that each new material is a complete renewal/improvement of a previous one instead of just another text for the same goal. To put it short: publishing the new course doesn't mean the old one became obsolete. Language learning "methods" change with trend and since people learn differently that means the new, revolutionary "methods" will still appeal just to a segment. Everytime you replace an old course with a newer one, supposedly better, you're taking away thew opportunity of learning for those to whom that old course fit. From a commercial point of view, I can understand taking away the old and forcing people to get the new, but Lernu is seemingly non-profit and I don't see the point in letting go of the rich archive the site always had.

While reading the Curaçaoan newspaper, it mentioned another source, Notisiacla . It is from Aruba and uses the Aruban spelling, but it might be good for a change. It seems to be updated more often.

The FUN portal of French MOOCs has started adding introductory courses by the renowned Parisian institute INALCO. They're just an appetizer, but might be quite useful as a start. I almost fell for the Czech wanderlust trap.

Finished Türkisch für Anfänger. Now I'm going to watch the film, for completion's sake. The series was good for my German, but I used subtitles most of it. Next I'm doing dubbed series so I can actually improve my listening the way I'm doing with Russian and Georgian.

The book "Learn Greek without a teacher" is useful, but not for a true beginner. It runs into some mistakes when it comes to vocabulary and exercises. It just pastes a word list that hasn't been mentioned through the lesson and then uses half of it on exercises that have no translation. Besides, lesson 2 has no translating exercises. Still a good book, though.

Started L'Espagnol. It's a much better book so far, despite being supposed to be dumbed-down. It gives the main tips straightaway, like not to use the verb 'coger' in Latin America. It's way too long in notes, though, and some are better off suppressed, like, why having a note to explain that 'ha' is the 3rd person-equivalent of 'he'? A nice tip for francophones: everytime the verb 'être' can be replaced by 'se trouver', you should use 'estar' in Spanish (and also in Portuguese, one can assume).

Other than that, I'm really happy I'm learning Spanish proper, following the path I took with my other self-learned languages and giving it the attention it deserves. I did have classes both at school and at private schools, but either way the focus was on the grammatical idiosincracies when compared to Portuguese and not on embracing the culture(s).

Today I finally managed to finish my tasks almost two hours earlier, and so I added 20 minutes of the movie "Les yeux jaunes des crocodiles", which I want to finish soon so I can listen to the audiobook of its sequel.

While searching for the missing TV series, I manage to write in French on a forum, and I'm looking forward to write on another one. Not bad.
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Re: Expug's 2017 Log - It's now and forever

Postby Expugnator » Wed Mar 15, 2017 8:45 pm

Like I said yesterday, I did manage to read Jo Nesbø's book in Portuguese. It's much faster to read in L1 so it really didn't mess up with my schedule and I could enjoy the story better, as there is so much unclear when I listen to the audiobook in Norwegian. Today I've just read further after listening to a few more tracks.

A good day for reading Mandarin. I could follow the story just with listening and Pera-pera. I missed some important details that I caught up later on with the Portuguese translation, but overall I've noticed progress.

There is a lot of recursion and intertwining in my readings. I'm reading a book on Economics that talks about the change of capitalism into Access and the current chapter is about tourism. The author quotes another writer who writes about the artificiality of some touristical experiences. I'm really looking forward to reading more about this. Dean MacCannell has books such as "The Tourist" and "The ethics of sightseeing".

The Agatha Christie's book in Estonian is having a lot of dialogues and so it's being good practice.

I'm done watching the film "Les yeux jaunes des crocodiles". I liked seeing the scenes 'materialize' in front of my eyes, but I think whoever hasn't read the novel will be completely lost. Now I'm free to a) watch something else, like a series, in my post-schedule time and b) listen to the second audiobook in the series.

Keeping on the project of enjoying current series, I've finished one more episode of The OA with Russian voice-over. IT's being really useful to my Russian and I still can enjoy the series.

RussianКак тебе нравятся города? Я привык живут в большом городе, не имеющий удобный общественный транспорт, но я на самом деле спланировал свою жизнь таким обраозт, что позволял меня ходить на работу.

Мне на самом деле больше нравятся города среднего размера, как мой родной город. Тут есть 300 тысяч жителей, и все необходимое для современной жизни, как хорошие больницы, университеты и особая культурная жизнь. Я оставил его, потому что у него не было того курса, который я хотел посетить в университете.

The lines above took me less time than usual to write, but I still relied a lot on GT, while self-correcting a few obvious mistakes (and making some even worse ones, I suppose).
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Re: Expug's 2017 Log - It's now and forever

Postby Expugnator » Thu Mar 16, 2017 8:47 pm

My obsession with reaching higher levels of comprehension in Norwegian took the hidden moments approach to an extreme. I managed to listen to Jo Nesbø's audiobook while reading the Portuguese translation on the phone. I walk through arborized neighborhoods, large sidewalks and long blocks, so I can really make it work through reading and knowing when to stop for the crossings. I just don't want to turn this into a habit, especially since my goal is getting better at listening and listening only, which I managed with French and Italian.

The fact is Norwegian listening remains frustating. Some authors might be easier and most of them just...normal. So when I thought I had a breakthrough I was actually just picking an easy voice to listen to. Anyway, I think I still need to improve my reading as well. Next book will have both Norwegian text and audiobook. The sequel to Odinsbarn wouldn't be a bad idea. After all, it takes me long to read a book in Norwegian at 10 pages a day, I can make those purchases fit in my book every three months.

My Russian paragraph got corrected on italki. It was better than usual. I even got corrected for style, which means some sentences weren't entirely wrong. Though I had the same issue I usually do, when the native thinks you mean otherwise. I clearly used the past tense and he thought I was making plans for the future.

The files I need for a Georgian series are no longer available. The series is available on Netflix which I do have, but I obviously need the Georgian dubbing. It's a bad idea to even watch seasons from 3, 2 years ago, and from now on I should only start brand new series or binge watch the seasons of the previous year in order to keep up-to-date with the new releases and the fresher download links. The worries of a learner of multiple languags. Anyway, I'm trying all the alternatives and I even wrote an email in Georgian!

And I even got answered! Gee this is language practice happening.

I decided to give Les Revenants a try after a classmate assured me it's not about zombies. Now there are so many French series in my wishlist!

GermanEs gibt so viele französische Serien, dass ich gucken will, und so wenige Deutschen. Ich erinerre mich nun nur an Tatortreiniger, muss wieder recherchieren und Kritiker über andere Serien lesen. Zuerst will ich allerdings auf Deutsch synchronisierte Serien sehen. Warum? Weil synchrosierte Videoen leicht um verstehen sind, als diese, die ursprünglisch auf einer fremde Sprache sind.

I had time for 20 minutes more of The OA in Russian. I'm watching a series I was willing to and I'm getting clear Russian audio with Portuguese subtitles. It's quite motivating to see that Russian is becoming transparent. I'm still lacking active skills, but some sentences start to ingrain in my mind the way it happened when I started dubbed Georgian series. That leaves me quite excited about doing the same for German, even as my first schedule activity. I'll leave native German series for a further stage.
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Re: Expug's 2017 Log - It's now and forever

Postby Expugnator » Fri Mar 17, 2017 8:54 pm

So, my email in Georgian worked out, the files are back online and I should get them while they're there. I wasn't that lucky with the French series yet, though.

I'm considering Hebrew, I don't know when I'll be able to start it though. Sometimes I think a language with no vowels will be a lot of trouble, but then I remember Mandarin where most of the times the writing is totally clueless about pronunciation, and even when it is, it's just vague hints. So it's rather a matter of doing a lot of listening and reading in order to get used to the shape of the words.

I finished the first film of the Fantomas trilogy. I don't like it when the bad guy is always making fun of people, but let's see how things go at the 2nd and 3rd ones.

Russian and Mandarin. Two great challenges, language learners' nemesis. Now they are starting to become friendly beasts. The day I manage to understand them I'll have reached two goals in life.

The book I'm reading in Italian is great for learning vocabulary. It has a slower pace and so I can focus on filling in the gaps in my knowledge. I don't feel that rush to fast-forward. It's like taking a walk through a calm and charming neighnborhood, other than a race to the end.

I'm learning and reviewing a lot of French through Assimil L'Espagnol. Some sentences are very transparent in Spanish, equivalent to Portuguese, but more tricky in French, so these get explained in detail and thus I learn more French than Spanish. Even so, I think there are way too many notes, and large ones.

I just got a recommendation for a German series, You are Wanted. It's available on Amazon Prime.

Today was slower. I was ahead of schedule, but I was digesting some news both here and in the economy. I just couldn't focus, so watching 20 minutes of The OA in Russian was already a personal victory.
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Re: Expug's 2017 Log - It's now and forever

Postby lthispresey » Sun Mar 19, 2017 3:58 am

Eu pensei em estudar hebraico tambem e a "filosofia" dos padrões das palavras trilaterais do árabe podem ser aplicadas a hebraico, além do aramaico e maltês, Recentemente baixei alguns livros de maltês : árabe com italiano, boa mistura :D . Os padrões em árabe vão pelo fa'al ف - ع - ل que em hebraico é o pa'al פ - ע - ל com cognatos que não acabam mais ... Eu achei um site bem útil chamado radiowebsites . org que tem várias rádios de vários países do mundo: eu fui ouvir o de Israel e já percebi que a maioria dos isralenses não pronunciam o 'h'=ה . A primeira palavra que reconheci foi hoje > ha-yom היום , que o cara pronunciou 'ayom' , um filme israelense que assisti se chama The Bubble - הבועה , muito bom.

Se algum dia vc decidir estudar albanês, te garanto que os vários significados de 'të' vão te enlouquecer.

Você já pensou em estudar linguagem de programção ? eu tenho vergonha em dizer q ainda não aprendi nenhuma...

Eu queria aprender KiSwahili tambem, mas eu queria tanto aprender Hausa, só consegui achar o curso do FSI, o de Yorùbá tmb... chatos que só.... Com seu conhecimento de francês, vc teria como pesquisar se existe materiais de boa qualidade sobre Hausa ?( não pra comprar ou upar pra mim, só pra saber se existe hehehe).

Vc tem planos para aprender alguma língua indiana ? eu não acredito que vou desisti de tamil pela milésima vez... eu sei que Hindi é sempre o "iniciador", mas ele não é dravidiano. Tamil é o q mais tem falantes, mas os materiais são tão "superficiais" , mas eu não li todos até o fim; dizem que o Colloquial é um bom introdutório; e verdade, o sotaque de Sri Lanka é bem mais fácil de entender. Dê uma olhada na escrita singalesa(Sinhalese) e tenta aprender num dia, dificílimo hahahah

E finalmente, vc acha que eu deveria escrever no seu log em inglês para não excluir os outros ou 'tudo bem' em postar em brazuca ? :D
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Re: Expug's 2017 Log - It's now and forever

Postby Expugnator » Mon Mar 20, 2017 8:47 pm

lthispresey wrote:Você já pensou em estudar linguagem de programção ? eu tenho vergonha em dizer q ainda não aprendi nenhuma...


Quando era mais novo cheguei a pensar; mas vi que não ia chegar longe por conta própria, e acabei não escolhendo nenhuma carreira que envolvesse programação.

Eu queria aprender KiSwahili tambem, mas eu queria tanto aprender Hausa, só consegui achar o curso do FSI, o de Yorùbá tmb... chatos que só.... Com seu conhecimento de francês, vc teria como pesquisar se existe materiais de boa qualidade sobre Hausa ?( não pra comprar ou upar pra mim, só pra saber se existe hehehe).


Em francês não conheço nenhum manual de hausa, não.

Vc tem planos para aprender alguma língua indiana ? eu não acredito que vou desisti de tamil pela milésima vez... eu sei que Hindi é sempre o "iniciador", mas ele não é dravidiano. Tamil é o q mais tem falantes, mas os materiais são tão "superficiais" , mas eu não li todos até o fim; dizem que o Colloquial é um bom introdutório; e verdade, o sotaque de Sri Lanka é bem mais fácil de entender. Dê uma olhada na escrita singalesa(Sinhalese) e tenta aprender num dia, dificílimo hahahah


Pretendo começar pelas indoeuropeias mesmo, pelo hindi e depois Nepali. O tâmil por enquanto não me interessa muito, ainda mais por ser bem diglóssica. Conheço um falante de tâmil, mas deve ser descendente, não sei se fala como nativo.

E finalmente, vc acha que eu deveria escrever no seu log em inglês para não excluir os outros ou 'tudo bem' em postar em brazuca ? :D


Pode ficar à vontade. Com certeza tem gente que aproveita pra treinar o português.

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Weekend

The weekend was of sound success. Not that I learned any miracle skill; I actually got very little done, just a few Hello Chinese lessons and two pages from the book I already read during the week. What I manage was to get a lot of material done which will keep me motivated for learning. I solved most of the bottlenecks in getting material

First I got the native Estonian series with subtitles. I figured out how to download them by looking at forums in Estonian; I checked when the subtitled episodes start (the series has been running for over 20 years) and prepared for when I'm out of cartoon episodes. Knowing that my Estonian will keep improving consistently and won't run out of materials is worth celebrating, as it motivates me and makes me enjoy the language even more. The series has plenty of dialogues. It's like the soap opera I had been watching in Georgian for several years, with the difference that in the case of Estonian I'm going to have comprehensible input thanks to the subtitles. I expect to keep progressing more quickly in Estonian than in my previous opaque languages. I am going to use the Estonian subtitles which match the audio precisely and just paste a Notepad file with the same subtitles machine-translated into English. That will be better than watching series in English with Estonian and English subtitles, which is what I'm already doing as a post-schedule task and which is both fun and helpful, but why not do both?

Then Georgian. The issue with the missing episodes is over, I'm getting as many as I can. I'm doing mostly super-hero series dubbed in Georgian, so I hope to get Iron Fist in Georgian when it is released by the dubbing studio.

Still on dubbing, I managed to find actual dubbed episodes instead of monovoice for the next episodes of The OA. More pleasant to the ears, richer in terms of learning.

As for French, I remembered that my backup HDD had the files to the series that went offline. So I went and got them. I had deleted them from my working mobile HDD because I mistakenly downloaded the low def version, but now begs can't be chosen. I know I've postponed the problem to the third season, but for then on I maight have other sources.

Moreover, I managed to catch up with reading the forum, and I hope to keep it so I can participate on the discussions as they happen and not just read threads that are already over.

Norwegian and listening to suboptimal audio
Today when commuting I found it considerably hard to understand the Norwegian audiobook. The bluetooth earphone has two speakers, a built-in one and a wired one, connected to its USB port. My former earphone got the built-in one damaged, so nothing to be done. This one, though, was having the wired speaker functioning lowly and lowly. So I finally decided to try the wired one from the broken phone into this new one, and now it's so high it hurts. I should remember to always keep those wired speakers when the earphones are gone (As a matter of fact, the current earphone is the one I bought together with the headset that got damaged quite quickly; I was upset about it but it turned out this one is lasting much longer than all previous ones, so it wasn't a ruined deal).

Back on Norwegian, I am managing to walk, listen and read from my phone. It works wonders, except when the phone runs out of battery. So I kept listening at suboptimal conditions. I was already sad about my skills not keeping up with time, and people who read this log and know about my struggle with Norwegian know how disheartening it can be at this time. But then hardly could I expect that this suboptimal listening would do great for improvement in other skills: when I got to desktop study and watched the comedy series and then listened to the other audiobook, I noticed they were way easier to understand and even start to become transparent. Thus, a situation that was discouraging turned out to be a source of improvement.

Time on "easier" languages
I usually alternate starting "easier" languages, transparent ones, ones I can already read (almost) from scratch thanks to the high number of cognates - such as Spanish, Esperanto, Catalan or Swedish, since I know Norwegian - with truly new, opaque languages. I start each new language slowly, 1 resource at a time, only when I have post-schedule time, and then as I advance in the A2 range I add more resources a day and eventually native material. In theory, I could be studying more transparent languages, but I have been refusing the easy path and being a crippled polyglot who only navigates in the Romance/Germanic hemispheres.

Then the maths got me thinking: If I need 1 hour a day to reach B2 after 5 years in an opaque language, I might probably need only 20-25% of this time in a transparent language. Even this is debatable, because I will be already in the B2 range for passive skills when I start (I certainly am in Italian and Spanish), and passive skills tend to be my sole immediate goal anyway. So why postpone Esperanto, Catalan or even Romanian and Swedish, if with only 15 minutes a day I can finish Assimil in around 3 months (I do 7 lessons a day when they are transparent, as with Spanish)? I have to test on this, because even if reading is easy I still do an active effort to pay attention on the differences, but the impression I have is I'm postponing having access to cultures, films, novels, audiobooks that remain unknown to me. I could be doing more like Systematiker in this respect.
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The afternoon was very busy and I could barely reach the Spanish lessons on Assimil. No Clozemaster, no dubbed series in Russian.
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Corrections welcome for any language.

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smallwhite
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Re: Expug's 2017 Log - It's now and forever

Postby smallwhite » Tue Mar 21, 2017 2:54 am

Expugnator wrote:At Narnia, I learned a nice idiom, 好景不长/Hǎojǐng bù cháng. In Portuguese, o que é bom dura pouco.

好景不常
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