Team Me: Foxing around

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reineke
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby reineke » Wed Dec 13, 2017 4:45 pm

The "bogus" list:

J. Peder Zane
The Top Ten: Writers Pick Their Favorite Books

From The Washington Post
Operating on the theory that no one knows more about great books than great writers, J. Peder Zane, book editor of the Raleigh News & Observer, asked 125 British and American writers (Andrea Barrett, Edwidge Danticat, Ha Jin, Reynolds Price and Tom Wolfe, among them) to "provide a list, ranked, in order, of what you consider the ten greatest works of fiction of all time." Zane suggests that these lists (and reconfigurations of the most often cited titles into various categories -- top ten works of the 19th century, living writers, comic works and so on) are "detailed road maps to the land of literary possibilities": "Part Rand-McNally, part Zagat's . . . it takes the anxiety out of bibliophilia by offering a comprehensive and authoritative guide to the world's best books."

This is a readers' service of the first order, a guidebook to the resulting 544 titles for those tortured by too much choice and looking for what to read next. Each of the 125 responses appears in Zane's book -- some in short answer form, some just titles, some annotated -- along with a few essays, helping steer you through what Zane calls the "yin and yang of the modern reader: opportunity and befuddlement."

To get you started, here's "The Top Top Ten":

1. Anna Karenina, by Leo Tolstoy
2. Madame Bovary, by Gustave Flaubert
3. War and Peace, by Leo Tolstoy
4. Lolita, by Vladimir Nabokov
5. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain
6. Hamlet, by William Shakespeare
7. The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
8. In Search of Lost Time, by Marcel Proust
9. The stories of Anton Chekhov
10. Middlemarch, by George Eliot

The Atlantic

"From David Foster Wallace (#1: The Screwtape Letters by C.S. Lewis) to Stephen King (#1: The Golden Argosy, a 1955 anthology of the best short stories in the English language), the collection offers a rare glimpse of the building blocks of great creators' combinatorial creativity—because, as Austin Kleon put it, "you are a mashup of what you let into your life."

The book concludes with an appendix of "literary number games" summing up some patterns and constructing several overall rankings based on the totality of the different authors' picks.

Top Ten Works of the 20th Century
1. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov

2.The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

3. In Search of Lost Time by Marcel Proust

4. Ulysses* by James Joyce

5. Dubliners* by James Joyce

6. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

7. The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner

8. To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

9. The complete stories of Flannery O'Connor

10. Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov

Top Ten Works of the 19th Century
1. Anna Karenina* by Leo Tolstoy

2. Madame Bovary* by Gustave Flaubert

3. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

4. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

5. The stories of Anton Chekhov

6. Middlemarch* by George Eliot

7. Moby-Dick by Herman Melville

8. Great Expectations* by Charles Dickens

9. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky

10. Emma* by Jane Austen

Top Ten Authors by Number of Books Selected
1. William Shakespeare – 11

2. William Faulkner – 6

3. Henry James – 6

4. Jane Austen – 5

5. Charles Dickens – 5

6. Fyodor Dostoevsky – 5

7. Ernest Hemingway – 5

8. Franz Kafka – 5

9. Tied: James Joyce, Thomas Mann, Vladimir Nabokov, Mark Twain, Virginia Woolf – 4

Top Ten Authors by Points Earned
1. Leo Tolstoy – 327

2. William Shakespeare – 293

3. James Joyce – 194

4. Vladimir Nabokov – 190

5. Fyodor Dostoevsky – 177

6. William Faulkner – 173

7. Charles Dickens – 168

8. Anton Checkhov – 165

9. Gustave Flaubert – 163

10. Jane Austen – 161

https://www.theatlantic.com/amp/article/252209/

The owner of the site http://thegreatestbooks.org compiles a list of lists. If you know of any good lists by Brazilian, Dutch, Polish or Korean authors, do let him know.
Last edited by reineke on Wed Dec 13, 2017 5:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby reineke » Wed Dec 13, 2017 4:48 pm

100 prominent authors from more than 50 different nations have elected The Library of World Literature: "The 100 Best Books in the History of Literature".

The winner of the vote - with 50% more votes than any other book - is the widely read Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, published in Spain in two parts, 1605 and 1615.

The editors of The Norwegian Book Clubs asked the 100 authors to nominate ten books that, in their opinion, are the ten best and most central works in world literature: These are books that have had a decisive impact on the cultural history of the world and also left an individual mark on the authors own thinking and imagination.

John Irving, Salman Rushdie, John le Carré, Nadine Gordimer, Milan Kundera, Christa Wolf, Carlos Fuentes, V.S. Naipaul, Paul Auster, A.S. Byatt, Ben Okri, Orhan Pamuk, Fay Weldon, Wole Soyinka, Bei Dao, Nawal El Saadawi, Yvonne Vera, Astrid Lindgren, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Norman Mailer... - and 80 other prominent authors attended the election.

The 100 titles that gathered most votes take their place in the Library of World Literature. Except for Don Quixote, the titles are not ranked.

This is the Library of World Literature. The authors are listed in alphabetical order.

https://www.bokklubben.no/SamboWeb/side ... klubbid=WB
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby reineke » Wed Dec 13, 2017 8:19 pm

Os 50 melhores livros da história da literatura

A list of lists - Brazilian style

Para se chegar ao resultado fizemos uma compilação de listas publicadas por jornais, revistas e sites especializados em listas, mercado editorial e livros. O objetivo da pesquisa era identificar, baseado nestas listas, quais eram os melhores livros da história da literatura. Algumas das listas pesquisadas incluíam apenas romances, outras — livros não ficcionais. Algumas traziam apenas obras do século 20, outras — obras seminais, formadoras da cultural ocidental. Após a seleção das listas, criamos uma base de dados para que todos os livros fossem pontuados igualmente independentemente do gênero ou período em que foi escrito.

Obviamente que listas são sempre incompletas, idiossincráticas. Sabe-se que, como a percepção, a opinião — que é a base de todas as listas —, é algo individual. De qualquer forma, os livros selecionados, se não são unanimidades entre as publicações pesquisadas (e possivelmente não serão entre os leitores), são referências incontestes da grandeza e importância da literatura para a humanidade.

O resultado não pretende ser abrangente ou definitivo, antes é apenas um reflexo da paixão de leitores e críticos que ajudaram a construir, com suas opiniões, um vasto guia literário que percorre mais de 2 mil anos de história. As sinopses são das respectivas editoras.

1 — Dom Quixote, Miguel de Cervantes, 1605
2 — Guerra e Paz, Liev Tolstói, 1869
3 — A Montanha Mágica, Thomas Mann, 1924
4 — Cem Anos de Solidão, Gabriel García Márquez, 1967

etc.

11 — Crime e Castigo, Fiódor Dostoiévski, 1866
12 — Orgulho e Preconceito, Jane Austen, 1813
13 — Anna Kariênina, Liev Tolstói, 1877
14 — Grande Sertão: Veredas, Guimarães Rosa, 1956
15 — O Leopardo, Tomaso di Lampedusa, 1958
16 — Édipo Rei, Sófocles, 427 a.c.
17 — 1984, George Orwell, 1949
18 — O Castelo, Franz Kafka, 1926
19 — As Asas da Pomba, Henry James, 1902
20 — Ilíada e Odisseia, Homero, século 8 a.c.
21 — A Vida e as Opiniões do Cavalheiro Tristram Shandy, Laurence Sterne, 1759
22 — Doutor Fausto, Thomas Mann, 1947
23 — Lolita, Vladímir Nabókov, 1955
24 — Enquanto Agonizo, William Faulkner, 1930
25 — A Morte de Virgílio, Hermann Broch, 1945
26 — Os Lusíadas, Luís de Camões, 1572
27 — O Homem Invisível, Ralph Ellison, 1952
28 — Hamlet, William Shakespeare, 1603
29 — Finnegans Wake, James Joyce, 1939
30 — Rumo ao Farol, Virginia Woolf, 1927
31 — Pedro Páramo, Juan Rulfo, 1955
32 — As Três Irmãs, Anton Tchekhov, 1901
33 — Pais e Filhos, de Ivan Turguêniev, 1862
34 — Contos da Cantuária, Geoffrey Chaucer, século 15
35 — As Viagens de Gulliver, Jonathan Swift, 1726
36 — Folhas de Relva, Walt Whitman, 1855
37 — Middlemarch, George Eliot, 1874
38 — O Apanhador no Campo de Centeio, J. D. Salinger, 1951
39 — O Lobo da Estepe, Herman Hesse, 1927
40 — O Grande Gatsby, Scott Fitzgerald, 1925
41 — A Peste, Albert Camus, 1947
42 — O Mestre e Margarida, Mikhail Bulgákov, 1940
43 — As Vinhas da Ira, John Steinbeck, 1939
44 — Memórias de Adriano, Marguerite Yourcenar, 1951
45 — Paralelo 42, John dos Passos, 1930
46 — Admirável Mundo Novo, Aldous Huxley, 1932
47 — O Jogo da Amarelinha, Julio Cortázar, 1963
48 — A Náusea, Jean-Paul Sartre, 1938
49 — A Invenção de Morel, Adolfo Bioy Casares, 1940
50 — Memorial do Convento, José Saramago, 1982

http://www.revistabula.com/7802-os-melh ... iteratura/

Os 100 melhores livros de todos os tempos, a lista das listas

"Participaram do levantamento as publicações: “The New York Times”, “Amazon”, “Le Monde”, “The New York Public Library”, “BBC”, “The Guardian”, “Modern Library”, “Time”, “Newsweek”, “Telegraph”, “Lists Of Bests”, “Wikipedia”, “Folha de S. Paulo”, “Revista Época”, “Revista Bravo”.

...

11 — Crime e Castigo, Fiódor Dostoiévski, 1866
12 — Anna Kariênina, Liev Tolstói, 1877
13 — Édipo Rei, Sófocles, 427 a.c.
14 — 1984, George Orwell, 1949
15 — O Castelo, Franz Kafka, 1926
16 — Ilíada e Odisseia, Homero, século 8 a.c.
17 — A Vida e as Opiniões do Cavalheiro Tristram Shandy, Laurence Sterne, 1759
18 — Doutor Fausto, Thomas Mann, 1947
19 — Lolita, Vladímir Nabókov, 1955
20 — Enquanto Agonizo, William Faulkner, 1930
21 — A Morte de Virgílio, Hermann Broch, 1945
22 — Os Lusíadas, Luís de Camões, 1572
23 — O Homem Invisível, Ralph Ellison, 1952
24 — Hamlet, William Shakespeare, 1603
25 — Finnegans Wake, James Joyce, 1939
26 — Rumo ao Farol, Virginia Woolf, 1927
27 — Grande Sertão: Veredas (1956)
28 — Pedro Páramo, Juan Rulfo, 1955
29 — As Três Irmãs, Anton Tchekhov, 1901
30 — Orgulho e Preconceito, Jane Austen, 1813
31 — O Leopardo, Tomaso di Lampedusa, 1958
32 — Pais e Filhos, de Ivan Turguêniev, 1862
33 — Contos da Cantuária, Geoffrey Chaucer, século 15
34 — As Viagens de Gulliver, Jonathan Swift, 1726
35 — Middlemarch, George Eliot, 1874
36 — O Apanhador no Campo de Centeio, J. D. Salinger, 1951
37 — O Lobo da Estepe, Herman Hesse, 1927
38 — O Grande Gatsby, Scott Fitzgerald, 1925
39 — O Mestre e Margarida, Mikhail Bulgákov, 1940
40 — As Vinhas da Ira, John Steinbeck, 1939
41 — Memórias de Adriano, Marguerite Yourcenar, 1951
42 — Paralelo 42, John dos Passos, 1930
43 — Admirável Mundo Novo, Aldous Huxley, 1932
44 — As Asas da Pomba, Henry James, 1902
45 — O Jogo da Amarelinha, Julio Cortázar, 1963
46 — A Náusea, Jean-Paul Sartre, 1938
47 — A Peste, Albert Camus, 1947
48 — Folhas de Relva, Walt Whitman, 1855
49 — Memorial do Convento, José Saramago, 1982
50 — A Invenção de Morel, Adolfo Bioy Casares, 1940
51 — O Tambor, Günter Grass, 1959
52 — Retrato do Artista quando Jovem, James Joyce, 1917
53 — José e Seus Irmãos, Thomas Mann, 1933-1943
54 — Doutor Jivago, Boris Pasternak, 1957
55 — A Cidade e as Serras, Eça de Queirós, 1901
56 — O Estrangeiro, Albert Camus, 1942
57 — Otelo, William Shakespeare, 1622
58 — O Príncipe, Nicolau Maquiavel, 1532
59 — O Amante de Lady Chatterley, D.H. Lawrence, 1928
60 — Os Cantos, Ezra Pund, 1948
61 — A Consciência de Zeno, Italo Svevo, 1923
62 — On The Road, Jack Kerouac, 1957
63 — O Senhor dos Anéis, J.R.R. Tolkien, 1954
64 — A Terra Desolada, T. S. Eliot, 1922
65 — A Origem das Espécies, Charles Darwin, 1859
66 — A Laranja Mecânica, Anthony Burgess, 1962
67 — Luz em Agosto, William Faulkner, 1932
68 — O Coração das Trevas, Joseph Conrad, 1902
69 — Madame Bovary, Gustave Flaubert, 1856
70 — O Paraíso Perdido, John Milton, 1667
71 — Rei Lear, William Shakespeare, 1608
72 — Por Quem os Sinos Dobram, Ernest Hemingway, 1940
73 — Eneida, Virgílio, 19 a.c.
74 — Matadouro 5, Kurt Vonnegut, 1969
75 — A Sangue Frio, Truman Capote, 1965
76 — Histórias, Heródoto, 440 a.c.
77 — Moby Dick, de Herman Melville, 1851
78 — Mrs. Dalloway, Virgínia Woolf, 1925
79 — Lord Jim, Joseph Conrad, 1900
80 — Ardil 22, Joseph Heller, 1961
81 — A Amada, Toni Morrison, 1987
82 — O Capital, Karl Marx, 1867
83 — As Aventuras de Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain, 1885
84 — A Revolução dos Bichos, George Orwell, 1945
85 — Ficções, Jorge Luis Borges, 1944
86 — Frankenstein, Mary Shelley, 1818
87 — O Sol Também se Levanta, Ernest Hemingway, 1926
88 — Corre, Coelho, John Updike, 1960
89 — O Vermelho e o Negro, Stendhal, 1830
90 — O Complexo de Portnoy, Philip Roth, 1969
91 — Os Três Mosqueteiros, Alexandre Dumas, 1844
92 — A Interpretação dos Sonhos, Sigmund Freud, 1900
93 — Trópico de Câncer, Henry Miller, 1934
94 — Pergunte ao Pó, John Fante, 1939
95 — Reparação, Ian McEwan, 2001
96 — Os Miseráveis, Victor Hugo, 1862
97 — Meridiano de Sangue, Cormac McCarthy, 2008
98 — Sonetos, William Shakespeare, 1609
99 — Desonra, J. M. Coetzee, 1999
100 — O Deserto dos Tártaros, Dino Buzzati, 1940

http://www.livrosepessoas.com/2015/08/1 ... as-listas/

Em 1999 a Folha de São Paulo convocou um time de jurados de peso para escolher os melhores livros do século.

Ulisses (1922) de James Joyce foi escolhido o melhor romance do século. Cf. a lista com os 100 melhores romances.

https://diariograsiela.wordpress.com/20 ... sao-paulo/

[Alternate link (missing the top 10 books).
http://www1.folha.uol.com.br/fsp/mais/fs03019906.htm]

Acho que houve também a eleição dos melhores romances brasileiros, mas não achei.

A Ética Protestante e o Espírito do Capitalismo (1904) de Max Weber foi escolhido o melhor livro de não-ficção do século. Cf. a lista com os 100. [dead link]

Foram também escolhidas as 30 obras teóricas mais importantes escritas no Brasil:

1. Casa Grande e Senzala (1933) – Gilberto Freyre
2. Raízes do Brasil (1936) – Sérgio Buarque de Hollanda
3. Os Sertões (1902) – Euclides da Cunha
4. Formação da Literatura Brasileira (1959) – Antonio Candido
5. Formação do Brasil Contemporâneo (1942) – Caio Prado Jr.
6. Um Estadista do Império (1897-1899) – Joaquim Nabuco
7. Os Donos do Poder (1958) – Raymundo Faoro
8. Visão do Paraíso (1959) – Sérgio Buarque de Holanda
9. O Abolicionismo (1883) – Joaquim Nabuco
10. Dicionário do Folclore Brasileiro (1954) – Câmara Cascudo
11. Sobrados e Mucambos (1936) – Gilberto Freyre
12. Dialética da Malandragem (1970) – Antonio Candido
13. Parceiros do Rio Bonito (1964) – Antonio Candido
14. Homens Livres na Ordem Escravocata (1969) – Maria Sylvia Carvalho Franco
15. Bandeirantes e Pioneiros (1954) – Vianna Moog
16. História da Literatura Brasileira (1888) – Silvio Romero
17. Capítulo de História Colonial (1907) – Capistrano de Abreu
18. História da Literatura Ocidental (1958-1966) – Otto Maria Carpeaux – 8 vol.
19. Instinto de Nacionalidade (1873) – Machado de Assis
20. A Função Social da Guerra na Sociedade Tupinambá (1952) – Florestan Fernandes
21. América Latina – Males de Origem (1905) – Manuel Bonfim
22. Dom João VI no Brasil (1908) – Oliveira Lima
23. Minha Formação (1906) – Joaquim Nabuvo
24. Caminhos e Fronteiras (1957) – Sérgio Buarque de Holanda
25. Retrato do Brasil (1928) – Paulo Prado
26. Aspectos da Literatura Brasileira (1943) – Mário de Andrade
27. Ao Vencedor as Batatas (1977) – Roberto Schwarz
28. História Econômica do Brasil (1945) – Caio Prado Jr.
29. Carnavais, Malandros e Heróis (1979) – Roberto DaMatta
30. Prosa de Ficção (1950) – Lúcia Miguel Pereira

http://joaomattar.com/blog/2011/02/27/m ... do-seculo/
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby reineke » Wed Dec 13, 2017 9:42 pm

Those Folha leads were full of dead links. This list is a lot more interesting anyway, if you're looking for ideas for reading in Portuguese:

Enquete com especialistas elegeu os melhores livros e autores do país

A reportagem entrou em contato com 50 intelectuais de vários estados e instituições ligadas à literatura, como universidades, revistas especializada

postado em 14/04/2013

"Ao longo de três semanas, com o objetivo de fazer um levantamento sobre o que de melhor a literatura brasileira produziu e tem produzido ao longo da história, nos campos da poesia e da ficção, a reportagem entrou em contato com 50 intelectuais de vários estados e instituições ligadas à literatura, como universidades, revistas especializadas, cadernos de cultura de grandes jornais, centros de pesquisa e projetos literários e de incentivo à leitura. A eles foi pedido que indicassem, de acordo com suas preferências: a) os cinco melhores escritores vivos da literatura brasileira; b) os cinco melhores escritores da literatura brasileira de todos os tempos; c) os cinco melhores livros da literatura brasileira, ficção e poesia, de todos os tempos..

O resultado, como todas as listas da mesma natureza, por um lado consagra o cânone, por outro revela interessantes surpresas, que mostram a dinâmica que perpassa o setor cultural. Mesmo as mais consagradas escolhas carregam o marca do seu tempo. Além disso, o resultado acaba por constituir um repertório variado, que vale por um projeto de leitura para quem busca conhecer a literatura brasileira. As preferências pessoais, no contexto de uma seleção feita por um número significativo de especialistas, não deixa de abrir um diálogo com a sociedade sobre o valor da literatura e sua significação no processo de constituição da cultura brasileira.

Cinco melhores livros da literatura brasileira de todos os tempos (por ordem de votação)

1) Grande sertão: veredas, de Guimarães Rosa, Minas Gerais (1956)
2) Memórias póstumas de Brás Cubas, de Machado de Assis, Rio de Janeiro (1880)
3) Dom Casmurro, de Machado de Assis, Rio de Janeiro (1899)
4) Vidas secas, de Graciliano Ramos, Alagoas (1938)
5) São Bernardo, de Graciliano Ramos, Alagoas (1934)
6) A paixão segundo GH, de Clarice Lispector, nascida na Ucrânia e naturalizada brasileira, viveu em Pernambuco e no Rio de Janeiro
7) A rosa do povo, de Carlos Drummond de Andrade, Minas Gerais
8) Macunaíma, de Mário de Andrade, São Paulo
9) Educação pela pedra, de João Cabral de Melo Neto, Pernambuco
10) Claro enigma, de Carlos Drummond de Andrade, Minas Gerais
11) Os sertões, de Euclides da Cunha, Rio de Janeiro
12) A hora da estrela, de Clarice Lispector
13) Alguma poesia, de Carlos Drummond de Andrade, Minas Gerais
14) O tempo e o vento, de Erico Verissimo, Rio Grande do Sul
15) A invenção de Orfeu, de Jorge de Lima, Alagoas
16) Angústia, de Graciliano Ramos, Alagoas
17) Laços de família, de Clarice Lispector
18) Morte e vida severina, de João Cabral de Melo Neto, Pernambuco
19) Menina morta, de Cornélio Pena, Rio de Janeiro
20) Romanceiro da Inconfidência, de Cecília Meireles, Rio de Janeiro
21) Crônica da casa assassinada, de Lúcio Cardoso, Minas Gerais
22) Avalovara, de Osman Lins, Pernambuco
23) Crônica do viver baiano seiscentista, de Gregório de Matos, Bahia
24) Memorial de Aires, de Machado de Assis, Rio de Janeiro
25) Rútilo nada, de Hilda Hilst, São Paulo
26) A invenção do mar, de Gerardo Mello Mourão, Rio de Janeiro
27) As meninas, de Lygia Fagundes Telles, São Paulo
28) Esaú e Jacó, de Machado de Assis, Rio de Janeiro
29) Espumas flutuantes, de Castro Alves, Bahia
30) Memórias do cárcere, de Graciliano Ramos, Alagoas
31) O ateneu, de Raul Pompéia, Rio de Janeiro
32) Os velhos marinheiros e a morte e a morte de Quincas Berro d’agua, de Jorge Amado, Bahia
33) Poema sujo, de Ferreira Gullar, Maranhão
34) Contos do imigrante, de Samuel Rawet (nascido na Polônia, viveu no Rio de Janeiro e Brasília)
35) Corpo de baile, de Guimarães Rosa, Minas Gerais
36) Estrela da vida inteira, de Manuel Bandeira, Pernambuco
37) Incidente em Antares, de Erico Verissimo, Rio Grande do Sul
38) Lição das coisas, de Carlos Drummond de Andrade, Minas Gerais
39) Menino do engenho, de José Lins do Rego, Paraíba
40) Obra reunida, de Campos de Carvalho, Minas Gerais
41) O guesa errante, de Sousândrade, Maranhão
42) O mez da grippe, de Valêncio Xavier, São Paulo
43) O quinze, de Rachel de Queirós, Ceará
44) Perto do coração selvagem, de Clarice Lispector
45) Poemas negros, de Jorge de Lima, Alagoas
46) Primeiros cantos, de Gonçalves Dias, Maranhão
47) Sentimento do mundo, de Carlos Drummond de Andrade, Minas Gerais
48) Sinos da agonia, de Autran Dourado, Minas Gerais
49) Viva o povo brasileiro, de João Ubaldo Ribeiro, Bahia
50) Catrâmbias, de Evandro Afonso Ferreira, Minas Gerais
51) Crônicas reunidas, de Rubem Braga, Espírito Santo
52) Eles eram muitos cavalos, de Luiz Ruffato, Minas Gerais
53) Eu, de Augusto dos Anjos, Paraíba
54) Gabriela, cravo e canela, de Jorge Amado, Bahia
55) Galáxias, de Haroldo de Campos, São Paulo
56) Mação no escuro, de Clarice Lispector
57) O pirotécnico Zacarias, de Murilo Rubião, Minas Gerais
58) Pelo fundo da agulha, de Antônio Torres, Bahia
59) Relato de um certo oriente, de Milton Hatoum, Amazonas
60) Romance da Pedra do Reino, de Ariano Suassuna, Paraíba
61) Sagarana, de Guimarães Rosa, Minas Gerais
62) Estrela da manhã, de Manuel Bandeira, Pernambuco
63) Lavoura arcaica, de Raduan Nassar, São Paulo
64) Memórias sentimentais de João Miramar, de Oswald de Andrade, São Paulo
65) O albatroz azul, de João Ubaldo Ribeiro, Bahia
66) O cão sem plumas, de João Cabral de Melo Neto, Pernambuco
67) O encontro marcado, de Fernando Sabino, Minas Gerais
68) Sítio do Pica-pau Amarelo, de Monteiro Lobato, São Paulo
69) Toda poesia, de Paulo Leminski, Paraná
70) Tu, não te moves de ti, de Hilda Hilst, São Paulo

Dos 70 livros citados entre os melhores de todos os tempos:

- O século 20 domina, como 59 títulos
- Um foi publicado no século 17: Crônica do viver baiano seiscentista, de Gregório de Matos
- Seis foram publicados no século 19: Primeiros cantos, de Gonçalves Dias; O guesa errante, de Sousândrade; O ateneu, de Raul Pompéia; Espumas flutuantes, de Castro Alves; Dom Casmurro e Memórias póstumas de Brás Cubas, de Machado de Assis.
- Quatro foram publicados no século 21: O albatroz azul, de João Ubaldo Ribeiro; Catrâmbrias, de Evandro Affonso Ferreira, Eles eram muitos cavalos, de Luiz Ruffato; e Pelo fundo da agulha, de Antonio Torres (trilogia encerrada em 2006)
- Nenhum dos 70 livros foi escrito no século 18

Escritores que tiveram mais de um livro citado entre os melhores da literatura brasileira
Carlos Drummond de Andrade, 5 (Rosa do povo, Claro enigma, Lição das coisas, Sentimento do mundo e Alguma poesia)

Clarice Lispector, 5 (A paixão segundo GH, A hora da estrela, Perto do coração selvagem, A maçã no escuro e Laços de família)

Machado de Assis, 4 (Memórias póstumas de Brás Cubas, Dom Casmurro, Esaú e Jacó e Memorial de Aires)

Graciliano Ramos, 4 (Vidas secas, São Bernardo, Memórias do Cárcere e Angústia)

Guimarães Rosa, 3 (Grande sertão: veredas, Sagarana e Corpo de baile)

João Cabral de Melo Neto, 3 (Educação pela pedra, O cão sem plumas e Morte e vida severina)

Erico Verissimo, 2 (O tempo e o vento e Incidente em Antares)

Hilda Hilst, 2 (Rútilo nada e Tu não te moves de ti)

João Ubaldo Ribeiro, 2 (Viva o povo brasileiro e O albatroz azul)

Jorge Amado, 2 (Velhos marinheiros e Gabriela, cravo e canela)

Jorge de Lima, 2 (A invenção de Orfeu e Poemas negros)

Manuel Bandeira, 2 (Estrela da vida inteira e Estrela da manhã)

Maiores escritores brasileiros de todos os tempos (por ordem de votação)
1) Machado de Assis, Rio de Janeiro (1839-1908)
2) Guimarães Rosa, Minas Gerais (1908-1967)
3) Carlos Drummond Andrade, Minas Gerais (1902-1987)
4) Graciliano Ramos, Alagoas (1892-1953)
5) Clarice Lispector, nascida na Ucrânia, viveu em Pernambuco e no Rio de Janeiro (1920-1977)
6) João Cabral de Melo Neto, Pernambuco (1920-1999)
7) Castro Alves, Bahia (1847-1891)
8) Gregório de Matos, Bahia (1636-1696)
9) Euclides da Cunha, Rio de Janeiro (1866-1909)
10) Cecília Meireles, Rio de Janeiro (1901-1964)
11) Caio Fernando Abreu, Rio Grande do Sul (1948-1996)
12) Erico Verissimo, Rio Grande do Sul (1905-1975)
13) Gonçalves Dias, Maranhão (1823-1864)
14) Lima Barreto, Rio de Janeiro (1881-1922)
15) Nelson Rodrigues, Pernambuco (1912-1980)
16) Oswald de Andrade, São Paulo (1890-1954)
17) Cruz e Souza, Santa Catarina (1861-1898)
18) José de Alencar, Ceará (1829-1877)
19) Manuel Bandeira, Pernambuco (1886-1968)
20) Dalton Trevisan, Paraná (1925)
21) Autran Dourado, Minas Gerais (1926-2012)
22) Hilda Hilst, São Paulo (1930-2004)
23) Lúcio Cardoso, Minas Gerais (1913-1968)
24) João Ubaldo Ribeiro, Bahia (1941)
25) Jorge de Lima, Alagoas (1895-1953)
26) José Lins do Rego, Paraíba (1901-1957)
27) Lygia Fagundes Telles, São Paulo (1923)
28) Rubem Braga, Espírito Santo (1913-1990)
29) Sousândrade, Maranhão (1832-1902)
30) Carlos Pena Filho, Pernambuco (1929-1960)
31) Mário de Andrade, São Paulo (1893-1945)
32) Moacyr Scliar, Rio Grande do Sul (1937-2011)
33) Osman Lins, Pernambuco (1924-1978)
34) Rachel de Queirós, Ceará (1910-2003)
35) Rubem Fonseca, Minas Gerais (1925)
36) Vinicius de Moraes, Rio de Janeiro (1913-1980)
37) Dalcídio Jurandir, Pará (1909- 1979)
38) Hugo de Carvalho Ramos, Goiás (1895-1921)

» Entre os maiores escritores da literatura brasileira de todos os tempos que receberam indicações, apenas quatro estão vivos, Rubem Fonseca, João Ubaldo Ribeiro, Lygia Fagundes Telles e Dalton Trevisan

» O estados brasileiro com mais nomes de escritores citados foi Pernambuco, com 6 indicações; seguido de Rio de Janeiro e Minas Gerais, com 5; São Paulo com 4; Rio Grande do Sul e Bahia com 3; Alagoas, Maranhão e Ceará com 2; e Espírito Santo, Paraná, Santa Catarina, Goiás, Paraíba e Pará com 1

» Dos escritores considerados os maiores da literatura brasileira, 1 nasceu no século 17 (Gregório de Mattos); 14 nasceram no século 19; e 23 no século 20

» Os cinco maiores escritores brasileiros de todos os tempos morreram no Rio de Janeiro

Os maiores escritores brasileiros vivos (por ordem de votação)
1) Dalton Trevisan, Paraná (1925)
2) Ferreira Gullar, Maranhão (1930)
3) Lygia Fagundes Telles, São Paulo (1923)
4) Milton Hatoum, Amazonas (1952)
5) Rubem Fonseca, Minas Gerais (1925)
6) João Ubaldo Ribeiro, Bahia (1941)
7) Manoel de Barros, Mato Grosso (1916)
8) Ariano Suassuna, Paraíba ( 1927)
9) Raduan Nassar, São Paulo (1935)
10) Adélia Prado, Minas Gerais (1935)
11) Sérgio Sant’Anna, Rio de Janeiro (1941)
12) Luis Ruffato, Minas Gerais (1961)
13) Augusto de Campos, São Paulo (1931)
14) Bernardo Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro (1960)
15) Luis Fernando Verissimo, Rio Grande do Sul (1936)
16) João Gilberto Noll, Rio Grande do Sul (1946)
17) Nélida Piñon, Rio de Janeiro (1937)
18) Cristóvão Tezza, Santa Catarina (1952)
19) Siviano Santiago, Minas Gerais (1936)
20) Affonso Romano de Sant’Anna, Minas Gerais (1937)
21) Paulo Henriques Britto, Rio de Janeiro (1951)
22) Alberto Mussa, Rio de Janeiro (1961)
23) Armando Freitas Filho, Rio de Janeiro (1940)
24) Carlos Heitor Cony, Rio de Janeiro (1926)
25) Evandro Afonso Ferreira, Minas Gerais (1945)
26) Glauco Mattoso, São Paulo ( 1951)
27) Ignácio de Loyola Brandão, São Paulo (1936)
28) Rui Mourão, Minas Gerais (1929)
29) Angela Lago, Minas Gerais (1945)
30) Edney Silvestre, Rio de Janeiro (1950)
31) Antonio Torres, Bahia ( 1940)
32) Chico Buarque, Rio de Janeiro (1944)
33) Francisco Alvim, Minas Gerais (1938)
34) Francisco Azevedo, Rio de Janeiro (1951)
35)Luiz Vilela, Minas Gerais (1942)
36) Lya Luft, Rio Grande do Sul (1938)
37) Ana Miranda, Ceará (1951)
38) João Almino, Rio Grande do Norte (1950)
39) Raimundo Carrero, Pernambuco (1947)
40) Zulmira Ribeiro Tavares, São Paulo (1930)
41) Antonio Cícero, Rio de Janeiro (1945)
42) Ana Martins Marques, Minas Gerais (1977)
43) Beatriz Bracher, São Paulo (1961)
44) Cintia Moscovich, Rio Grande do Sul (1958)
45) Maria Esther Maciel, Minas Gerais (1963)
46) Miguel Sanches Neto, Paraná (1965)
47) Paulo Coelho, Rio de Janeiro (1947)
48) Reinaldo de Moraes, São Paulo (1950)
49) Ruth Rocha, São Paulo (1931)
50) Ruy Espinheira Filho, Bahia (1942)
51) Sebastião Nunes, Minas Gerais (1938)

» Foram citados 51 nomes, sendo 39 homens e 12 mulheres

» O mais velho é Manoel de Barros, nascido em 1916, em Mato Grosso.

» A mais nova é Ana Martins Marques, nascida em 1977, em Minas Gerais

» Entre os escolhidos, 12 são poetas e 39 prosadores

» O estado com maior número de autores citados é Minas Gerais, com 13, seguido do Rio de Janeiro, com 12, São Paulo, com 9, e Rio Grande do Sul, com 4

» Os demais estados com autores citados foram Bahia, com 3, Paraná com 2 e, com um autor citado cada, os estados do Maranhão, Santa Catarina, Amazonas, Mato Grosso, Paraíba, Ceará, Rio Grande do Norte e Pernambuco.

Quem votou
Armando Antenore, redator-chefe da revista Bravo, SP; Audemaro Taranto, professor da literatura da PUC/MG; Afonso Borges, projeto Sempre um papo, MG; Aleilton Fonseca, professor da literatura da Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, BA; Angelo Oswaldo, jornalista, membro da Academia Mineira de Letras, MG; Benjamin Abdala Jr., professor titular de literatura brasileira da USP, SP; Carlos Marcelo, editor-chefe do jornal Estado de Minas, MG; Cláudio Willer, jornalista e ensaísta, SP; Carlos Ribeiro, professor de jornalismo da Universidade Federal do Recôncavo Baiano, BA; Claudiney Ferreira, jornalista e gerente de audivisual do Itaú Cultural, SP; Ésio Macedo Ribeiro, ensaísta e crítico literário, Brasília; Eneida Maria de Souza, professora emérita de literatura brasileira da UFMG; Edgard Murano, jornalista, editor da revista Metáfora, SP; Francisco Bosco, ensaísta e colunista de O Globo, RJ; Flávio Loureiro Chaves, professor de literatura brasileira da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, RS; Fernanda Coutinho, professora de literatura da Universidade Federal da Paraíba, PB; Ivety Walty, professora de literatura brasileira da PUC/MG; José Eduardo Gonçalves, Ofício da Palavra, MG; Jorge Pieiro, ensaísta e crítico literário, CE; João Paulo, jornal Estado de Minas, MG; Jaime Prado Gouvêa, editor do Suplemento Literário de Minas Gerais, MG; Josélia Aguiar, jornalista e crítica literária, SP; Ligia Cademartori, doutora em teoria da literatura e ex-professora da Universidade de Brasília; Lucília de Almeida Neves, professora dos cursos de pós graduação em história e direitos humanos da Universidade de Brasília; Luciana Vilas-Boas, jornalista e agente literária, RJ; Letícia Malard, professora emérita de literatura da UFMG; Leyla Perrone Moisés, professora de literatura da Universidade de São Paulo, SP; Luci Collin, professora de literatura da Universidade Federal do Paraná, PR; Luis Augusto Fischer, professor de literatura da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, RS; Lúcia Riff, agente literária, RJ; Márcia Marques de Morais, professora de literatura na PUC/MG; Maria Adélia Menegazzo, professora de teoria da literatura da Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, MS; Nahima Maciel, do Correio Braziliense, Brasília; Ninfa Parreiras, professora de literatura da Estação das Letras/FNLIJ, RJ; Noemi Jaffe, crítica literária e professora de literatura da PUC/SP; Paulo Paniago, jornalista e professor de literatura da Universidade de Brasília; Piero Eyben, professor de Literatura da, Universidade Federal de Brasília; Paulo Goethe, do Diário de Pernambuco, PE; Raquel Naveira, professora de literatura na Universidade Anhembi-Murumbi, SP; Ronaldo Cagiano, jornalista e crítico literário, SP; Rinaldo de Fernandes, professor de literatura da Universidade Federal da Paraíba, PB; Ruth Silviano Brandão, professora emérita da UFMG; Regina Zilberman, professora da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, RS; Selma Caetano, curadora do Prêmio Portugal Telecom de Literatura, SP; Sonia Torres, professora de literatura e língua portuguesa da Universidade Federal Fluminense, RJ; Suzana Vargas, produtora cultural da Estação das Letras, RJ; Suênio Campos de Lucena, ensaísta e crítico literário, BA; Sérgio Sá, professor da Faculdade de Comunicação da Universidade de Brasília; Severino Francisco, do Correio Braziliense, Brasília; Wander Melo Miranda, professor de literatura da UFMG"

http://www.correiobraziliense.com.br/ap ... pais.shtml
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby DaveBee » Thu Dec 14, 2017 12:40 am

Blaurebell set herself a reading challenge to read books with an association for every province of a country, in her case Argentina.
blaurebell wrote:Argentinian Spanish intensive reading SC - this will be so much fun!
Literary road-trip through Argentina - one book for every province of Argentina. Since the country is very centralised, Argentinian literature is often set in Buenos Aires city or province. I want to get to know more regional literature and do a little literary road trip through the different provinces. I still dream of a proper road trip, but this is a good substitute for now.
De viaje (literario) por España - I actually got the idea for my Argentinian literary road trip from this list and might as well follow the original list, when I'm through my Argentinian literature reading list.

https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 120#p70120
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby reineke » Thu Dec 14, 2017 6:49 pm

Xmmm wrote:
reineke wrote:
The Greatest Books of All Time, as Voted by 125 Famous Authors

Top Ten Authors by Points Earned
1. Leo Tolstoy – 327

2. William Shakespeare – 293

3. James Joyce – 194

4. Vladimir Nabokov – 190

5. Fyodor Dostoevsky – 177

6. William Faulkner – 173

7. Charles Dickens – 168

8. Anton Checkhov – 165

9. Gustave Flaubert – 163

10. Jane Austen – 161


Let's see how many things are wrong with this list:

1. There is only one French author ... and amazingly, it's not Dumas. Le Comte de Monte Cristo is probably the single best novel ever written, so this is a curious oversight. If people want to be pretentious snobs and pretend like Dumas doesn't exist, what about Camus? Flaubert is better? Phooey.

2. The only American author to make the list is Faulkner. Hawthorne and Melville are both better. The Scarlet Letter and Moby Dick are the classic choices for "The Great American Novel." Has anyone ever finished a book by Faulkner? Also, no sign of Mark Twain!

3. I've read most major Russian authors in translation and Tolstoy > Nabokov > Dostoevsky is a joke. There are plenty of Russian natives on this board. What do you think, guys? I would rate Russian authors as:

Dostoevsky > Bulgakov > Nabokov > Pelevin > Chekhov > Tolstoy > Solzhenitsyn (fiction only, he's the best at non-fiction)

4. James Joyce is always highly praised, but he is little read. We should stop pretending. A great author that nobody reads is not a great author, but people are afraid to say the emperor has no clothes.

5. This list is so euro-centric! Where is Yukio Mishima, for crying out loud? I'm still recovering from reading The Sea of Fertility tetralogy 34 years ago!


A survey conducted by the Levada Center pollster among Russians over 18 has revealed the most popular writers and poets of all time in Russia.

The study was conducted through interviews among 1,600 people in 137 inhabited localities in 48 regions of the country.

In the writers category, Leo Tolstoy was named the greatest author. He "won" by a wide margin – his name was mentioned by 45 percent of the respondents.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky and Anton Chekhov were in second and third place.

There is not a single modern writer in the top 10.

In the poets category, 58 percent of respondents named Alexander Pushkin as the greatest author, followed by Sergei Yesenin and the author of A Hero of Our Time, Mikhail Lermontov.

None of Russia’s living poets is on the top 10 list.

Top 10 writers

Leo Tolstoy
Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Anton Chekhov
Alexander Pushkin
Nikolai Gogol
Mikhail Sholokhov
Mikhail Bulgakov
Ivan Turgenev
Maxim Gorky
Mikhail Lermontov


Top 10 poets

Alexander Pushkin
Sergei Yesenin
Mikhail Lermontov
Alexander Blok
Vladimir Mayakovsky
Anna Akhmatova
Marina Tsvetaeva
Nikolay Nekrasov
Fyodor Tyutchev
Afanasy Fet

https://www.rbth.com/arts/literature/20 ... oll_579125

Tolstoy or Dostoevsky? 8 Experts on Who’s Greater

Carol Apollonio, Professor of the Practice of Russian, Duke University

"The question shot straight into my brain and disabled the parietal cortex."

Ellen Chances, Professor of Russian Literature, Princeton University

The question, in my mind, is meaningless. One of the worrisome tendencies of contemporary society is its impulse to rank. Who is better? Who is Number One? The question should not be, “Who is the greater novelist?,” but rather, “What do I learn from reading the books of Tolstoy or Dostoevsky, or of anyone else?

Why does everything have to be a race? Why does everything have to be competitive? This implies that there is a winner and a loser. Why does the reading of Tolstoy or Dostoevsky or of anyone else have to be part of a “success” or “failure” story? Framing the question, “Tolstoy or Dostoevsky: Who’s the better novelist?,” in this way does a disservice, it seems to me, to the act of contemplating the meaning of these writers’ books.

Asking the question is equivalent to asking, “Which is the greater food, milk or orange juice? Which is the greater food, blueberries or strawberries? Which is better, the sky or the grass, night or day?”

Andrew Kaufman, author of Understanding Tolstoy and Lecturer in Slavic Languages and Literature, University of Virginia

All mediocre novelists are alike; every great novelist is great in his own way. Which is why the choice between nineteenth-century Russia’s two supreme prose writers ultimately boils down to the question of which kind of greatness resonates with a particular reader. My own sympathies are with Tolstoy, and even my criteria for judging a work of fiction, I admit, are relentlessly Tolstoyan.

Gary Saul Morson, Frances Hooper Professor of the Arts and Humanities, Northwestern University

A Soviet anecdote has it that Stalin once asked the Central Committee: which deviation is worse, the right or the left? Some fearfully ventured “the left,” others hesitantly offered, “the right.” The Great Helmsman then gave the right answer: “Both are worse.” I answer the question, “Who is the greater novelist, Tolstoy or Dostoevsky?”: Both are better.

Dostoevsky spoke to the twentieth century. He was unique in foreseeing that it would not be an era of sweetness and light, but the bloodiest on record. With uncanny accuracy, The Demons predicted, in detail, what totalitarianism would be.

Tolstoy speaks more to the 21st century. His novels’ key concept was contingency. At every moment, however small and ordinary, something happens that cannot entirely be accounted for by previous moments. Like Dostoevsky, Tolstoy also denied the possibility of a social science, which must always wind up resembling the “science of warfare” preached by the generals in War and Peace. Like macroeconomists today, these “scientists” are immune to counter-evidence. To use Tolstoy’s word, social science is mere “superstition.”

If social scientists understood people as well as Tolstoy, they would have been able to depict a human being as believable as Tolstoy’s characters, but of course none has come close.

If we once acknowledge that we will never have a social science, then we will, like General Kutuzov, learn to make decisions differently. We intellectuals would be more cautious, more modest, and ready to correct our errors by constant tinkering.

If we have left the age of ideologies behind, we may need Dostoevsky’s warnings less than Tolstoy’s wisdom.

https://themillions.com/2012/04/tolstoy ... eater.html
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby MorkTheFiddle » Thu Dec 14, 2017 7:31 pm

reineke wrote:Hardware: Two computers hooked to 2 TVs, a 400 DVD changer, one 1TB external hard disk drive, media players, wireless earphones. I'd like to hear from others regarding their use of hardware in language learning. Hopefully I will not prove that fancy gadgets do not a language learner make. Edit: Powerful stuff. In 2007.
Like a message from a bottle I pick up your request about hardware ten years later and hereby answer.
I use a Windows 10 desktop (used to use a Mac and a Linux box, but I have no real preference for any except a bit of a preference for Windows based on software that is available).
I have a laptop. I rarely use it for language study or anything else. Sometimes too many hours on the desktop induce carpal tunnel syndrome, so I switch back and forth to the laptop.
On very rare occasions I use an iPod, chiefly for dictionary look-ups. When my first Kindle went kaput, I used the iPod's Kindle app, but the screen is too small, so I bought a new Kindle.
My Kindle is used for very brief but quite frequent readings, especially in my "better" languages, French and Spanish.
I don't have a smartphone or a TV or any other electronic communications gadget.
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby Xmmm » Thu Dec 14, 2017 9:06 pm

reineke wrote:
Xmmm wrote:
reineke wrote:Ellen Chances, Professor of Russian Literature, Princeton University

The question, in my mind, is meaningless. One of the worrisome tendencies of contemporary society is its impulse to rank. Who is better? Who is Number One? The question should not be, “Who is the greater novelist?,” but rather, “What do I learn from reading the books of Tolstoy or Dostoevsky, or of anyone else?

Why does everything have to be a race? Why does everything have to be competitive? This implies that there is a winner and a loser. Why does the reading of Tolstoy or Dostoevsky or of anyone else have to be part of a “success” or “failure” story? Framing the question, “Tolstoy or Dostoevsky: Who’s the better novelist?,” in this way does a disservice, it seems to me, to the act of contemplating the meaning of these writers’ books.

Asking the question is equivalent to asking, “Which is the greater food, milk or orange juice? Which is the greater food, blueberries or strawberries? Which is better, the sky or the grass, night or day?”

Andrew Kaufman, author of Understanding Tolstoy and Lecturer in Slavic Languages and Literature, University of Virginia

All mediocre novelists are alike; every great novelist is great in his own way. Which is why the choice between nineteenth-century Russia’s two supreme prose writers ultimately boils down to the question of which kind of greatness resonates with a particular reader. My own sympathies are with Tolstoy, and even my criteria for judging a work of fiction, I admit, are relentlessly Tolstoyan.

Gary Saul Morson, Frances Hooper Professor of the Arts and Humanities, Northwestern University

A Soviet anecdote has it that Stalin once asked the Central Committee: which deviation is worse, the right or the left? Some fearfully ventured “the left,” others hesitantly offered, “the right.” The Great Helmsman then gave the right answer: “Both are worse.” I answer the question, “Who is the greater novelist, Tolstoy or Dostoevsky?”: Both are better.

Dostoevsky spoke to the twentieth century. He was unique in foreseeing that it would not be an era of sweetness and light, but the bloodiest on record. With uncanny accuracy, The Demons predicted, in detail, what totalitarianism would be.

Tolstoy speaks more to the 21st century. His novels’ key concept was contingency. At every moment, however small and ordinary, something happens that cannot entirely be accounted for by previous moments. Like Dostoevsky, Tolstoy also denied the possibility of a social science, which must always wind up resembling the “science of warfare” preached by the generals in War and Peace. Like macroeconomists today, these “scientists” are immune to counter-evidence. To use Tolstoy’s word, social science is mere “superstition.”

If social scientists understood people as well as Tolstoy, they would have been able to depict a human being as believable as Tolstoy’s characters, but of course none has come close.

If we once acknowledge that we will never have a social science, then we will, like General Kutuzov, learn to make decisions differently. We intellectuals would be more cautious, more modest, and ready to correct our errors by constant tinkering.

If we have left the age of ideologies behind, we may need Dostoevsky’s warnings less than Tolstoy’s wisdom.

https://themillions.com/2012/04/tolstoy ... eater.html


This signifies absolutely nothing to me. Experts make odd choices when they hand out the Nobel prize, too. Sometimes for political reasons, sometimes for cluelessness. It's almost comical to go through the list of great novels that didn't win, and compare them to what actually did win in a given year.

I feel a little bit like Mr. Tagomi in The Man in the High Castle when he wanders around San Francisco in a distracted state of mind. For people who haven't read it, I won't say why I feel that way.

I will drop out now. Some people like Tolstoy. Some people like Justin Bieber. Maybe they are the same people, but I don't know any of them.

Here's my Круглый impersonation for today: На вкус и цвет, товарищей нет.
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby Xmmm » Thu Dec 14, 2017 9:47 pm

One additional thought.

I was in an English lit Ph.D program at a top 30 university back in the day.

We were reading something by some deconstructionist. It was not Foucault or Derrida, it was some German guy ... I forget his name but he was a big wheel in the 1980s (I have a vague feeling he was discredited somehow later?). And in the text he'd written "in an almost Kierkegaardian repetition."

Now, I have to say that I wasted my youth and one of the ways I wasted it was by reading pretty much everything Kierkegaard wrote. And I had read Repetition.

So I objected in class. "He says this is almost Kierkegaardian repetition, but it's the opposite of Kierkegaardian repetition. Kierkegaard said when winter comes 50 times, each experience deepens our understanding of what Winter is, but this guy is saying it's just the same dumb thing over and over again, pointlessly. Which is like, normal everyday repetition."

And the professor said (moral to the story, and I've never forgotten it): "That's an interesting point and would make a good paper. He probably just threw that in there because it sounded impressive and he knew no one would call him on it because no one reads Kierkegaard anymore."

I also know a Marxist professor married to a fabulously wealthy lawyer and living in the absolute best part of town (with kids in private schools, the right cars, the right clothes -- the works), who is still "with the people".

So I don't assign a lot of weight to the thinking of literature professors ... and people who want to read actual good literature should take their recommendations with caution, imo.
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby reineke » Fri Dec 15, 2017 12:19 am

De gustibus etc but you suggested a different pecking order of greatness and asked what Russians thought. I obliged. A couple of the lists I mentioned reflect the opinions of American and international authors.

"When I knocked on the front door of Ernest Hemingway's house in Key West, he came out and stood squarely in front of me, squinty with annoyance, waiting for me to speak. I had nothing to say. I couldn't recall a word of my prepared speech. He was a big man, tall, narrow-hipped, wide-shouldered, and he stood with his feet spread apart, his arms hanging at his sides. He was crouched forward slightly with his weight on his toes, in the instinctive poise of a fighter ready to hit.

"What do you want?" said Hemingway. After an awkward moment, Samuelson explained that he had bummed his way from Minneapolis just to see him. "I read your story 'One Trip Across' in Cosmopolitan. I liked it so much I came down to have a talk with you." Hemingway seemed to relax. "Why the hell didn't you say you just wanted to chew the fat? I thought you wanted to visit." Hemingway told Samuelson he was busy, but invited him to come back at one-thirty the next afternoon.

After another night in jail, Samuelson returned to the house and found Hemingway sitting in the shade on the north porch, wearing khaki pants and bedroom slippers. He had a glass of whiskey and a copy of the New York Times. The two men began talking. Sitting there on the porch, Samuelson could sense that Hemingway was keeping him at a safe distance: "You were at his home but not in it. Almost like talking to a man out on a street." They began by talking about the Cosmopolitan story, and Samuelson mentioned his failed attempts at writing fiction. Hemingway offered some advice.

"The most important thing I've learned about writing is never write too much at a time," Hemingway said, tapping my arm with his finger. "Never pump yourself dry. Leave a little for the next day. The main thing is to know when to stop. Don't wait till you've written yourself out. When you're still going good and you come to an interesting place and you know what's going to happen next, that's the time to stop. Then leave it alone and don't think about it; let your subconscious mind do the work. The next morning, when you've had a good sleep and you're feeling fresh, rewrite what you wrote the day before. When you come to the interesting place and you know what is going to happen next, go on from there and stop at another high point of interest. That way, when you get through, your stuff is full of interesting places and when you write a novel you never get stuck and you make it interesting as you go along."

Hemingway advised Samuelson to avoid contemporary writers and compete only with the dead ones whose works have stood the test of time. "When you pass them up you know you're going good." He asked Samuelson what writers he liked. Samuelson said he enjoyed Robert Louis Stevenson's Kidnapped and Henry David Thoreau's Walden. "Ever read War and Peace?" Hemingway asked. Samuelson said he had not. "That's a damned good book. You ought to read it. We'll go up to my workshop and I'll make out a list you ought to read."

http://www.openculture.com/2013/05/erne ... _1934.html

Don't look but there's Flaubert in that list and a double helping of Tolstoy.
4 x


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