AroAro's log Pусский and עברית

Continue or start your personal language log here, including logs for challenge participants
ilmari
Orange Belt
Posts: 168
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 10:12 am
Languages: Fluent - French (N), English, Hebrew, Japanese.
Intermediate - Korean, Finnish, Spanish, Russian.
Studying (now) - Russian, Finnish, Estonian (with a big focus on Russian)
Dabbling - Italian, Polish, Yiddish, Mandarin Chinese, Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Urdu, Indonesian, Māori, Latin, Esperanto.
Would love to study - Norwegian, Swedish, Swahili, Ancient Greek, and so many more.
x 389

Re: AroAro's log Pусский and עברית

Postby ilmari » Wed Jan 13, 2021 5:10 am

So, up until the mid 20th century, Polish "ł" was pronounced like the Russian hard letter "л" (one must touch the upper teeth with the tip of the tongue). However, during the last few decades, this pronunciation was completely replaced by the new one - "ł" is now pronounced like "w" in English word "way" (it's more of a vowel than a real consonant). The old/Russian "ł" is called "ł sceniczne" ("theater ł") because it was required for actors/tv presenters to pronounce "ł" in this old way but nowadays I don't hear it anymore, not even on TV. People are maybe ashamed to use the "ł sceniczne" (or Russian hard "л") in everyday speech, it's perceived as some kind of regional, eastern variant and not the common norm.


Thank you, that's also very interesting. I knew about the Polish ł, but I did not know it replaced the Russian hard л. Now, thinking about it, it makes perfect sense. The city of Białystok (the radio link you sent) means "white slope", in Russian Белосток. The Russian белый is equivalent to the Polish biały.
2 x

User avatar
AroAro
Orange Belt
Posts: 110
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 12:57 pm
Languages: Native - Polish
Advanced - English, French, Italian
Intermediate - German, Romanian
Beginner - Russian, Hebrew
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... d80b60a5e9
x 319

Re: AroAro's log Pусский and עברית

Postby AroAro » Fri Jan 15, 2021 7:55 am

Hebrew - Assimil lesson 29. It took me 3 days to do the 4th revision lesson but there was a lot of information to absorb. Other than that, I tried to read an online article from news.walia.co.il - I just wanted to test my capability of recognizing Hebrew letters because I cannot truly read anything at this point. I admit that when I see a text in Hebrew, all I can see at the first glance are some "symbols" and it takes my brain a few moments to start processing what my eyes can see and I recognize slowly the letters. Of course, I still insert the vowels randomly in my inner voice but I recognized some words here and there (for example כברand גם...וגם) so the progress is (very slowly) happening.

Russian - Assimil lesson 43. The same thing here, I (re)started reading online articles from BBC Russian Service but I can understand quite a lot thanks to similarities between Polish and Russian. I also pay attention to mobile stress and try to guess when "o" is actually read as "a".

English - read pages 63-64 from Time, watched 1 video by NativLang

French - read pages 68-72 from Le Point. I watched 1 video by DocSeven (about radioactivity) but I think I watched enough YT videos in my life and am feeling fed up with them, so I listened also to RadioFranceInfo instead for some 2 hours in total while working

Italian - read p. 76-81 from L'Espresso, watched 1 video by NovaLectio about Black Death (again!) and listen to "Italia sotto inchiesta" from RaiRadio1

German - read p. 55-56 from Der Spiegel, listened to 1 "Deep Talk" and 1 "Weltempfanger" podcasts from FunkNova, 1 episode of "Zeit Verbrechen", watched 1 video by MrWissen2go, listened to 1 episode of "Echo der Welt" and "Zwischen Hamburg und Haiti" from NDR Info

Romanian - read 1 article from DeutscheWelle in Romanian, watched 1 Telejurnal and 2 episodes of "Romania te iubesc" and listened to 1 "Agenda globala". I stopped listening to the podcast "Istoria Romaniei" around the episode 33 - the multitude of names and events became overwhelming and I was not able to follow seamlessly the events described. Anyway, I'm interested in the early history of Romania only and the events past 1500 AD are not what interests me the most.

All in all, it's been a lazy week, I did not do as much as I expected but that's ok, we all need some kind of a break from time to time. I did more listening in German than in Romanian so I'm happy that the trend has been reversed. I will probably do some overtime in the next weeks and it's quite discouraging but I'll do my best to keep it up with language learning.

I also used up Christmas bonus from my company and ordered some books - I could even call it a shopping haul! So I bought "Krizom Krazom" series of course books for Slovak language (even though I will not start this language any time soon!) and "Assimil Le serbo-croate sans peine" printed in 1972, I'm still waiting for "Assimil Tschechisch ohne Muhe" (printed in 2004) and "Familia Romana - Lingua Latina per se illustrata" to be delivered but Amazon takes its time.
6 x

User avatar
cjareck
Blue Belt
Posts: 927
Joined: Tue Apr 25, 2017 6:11 pm
Location: Poland
Languages: Polish (N) English, German, Russian(B1?) French (B1?), Hebrew(B1?), Arabic(A2?), Mandarin (HSK 2)
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... =15&t=8589
x 2172
Contact:

Re: AroAro's log Pусский and עברית

Postby cjareck » Fri Jan 15, 2021 9:31 am

AroAro wrote:HebrewI recognized some words here and there (for example כברand גם...וגם) so the progress is (very slowly) happening.

I remember staring at Hebrew pages and then recognizing the only word מיג-15 (Mig-15, a Soviet airplane). I considered it a victory back then ;) The road ahead is long and complicated, but the most important is that you have started the trip!
2 x
Please feel free to correct me in any language


Listening: 1+ (83% content, 90% linguistic)
Reading: 1 (83% content, 90% linguistic)


MSA DLI : 18 / 141ESKK : 8 / 40


Mandarin Assimil : 36 / 105

User avatar
AroAro
Orange Belt
Posts: 110
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 12:57 pm
Languages: Native - Polish
Advanced - English, French, Italian
Intermediate - German, Romanian
Beginner - Russian, Hebrew
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... d80b60a5e9
x 319

Re: AroAro's log Pусский and עברית

Postby AroAro » Wed Jan 20, 2021 10:34 am

GEORGIAN

Ever since I listened to the Deutschland Funk Nova podcast episode about Bertha von Suttner (she spent a few years in Tbilisi and learned the language to the point that she was able to translate from Georgian into German - but sadly it was not the main focus of this episode), I've been searching for information about the Georgian language. According to one opinion, the Georgian verb system is even more complicated than the Hebrew one - doesn't bode well for my Hebrew learning! These languages are of course not related but it seems their conjugations are on a similar level of difficulty. On the other hand, once I've learned Hebrew conjugations, Georgian verbs will be a piece of cake ;) But at the same time, there are some stories of people who managed to learn Georgian, so it seems doable though the effort needed is probably bigger than in case of other languages. It all depends clearly on the languages we already know and the commitment. There are other languages I'd like to learn before toying with the idea of tackling Georgian but maybe one day, who knows... It's a country I've always wanted to go to anyway and I just love the sound of the language. And it has only 5 vowels - I always struggle to pronounce correctly all these long/short vowels out there (that's why I'll probably never learn Hungarian), so that looks almost like a blessing (though Georgian compensates it with multiple ejective consonants).

Regarding the Georgian verbal system, here are the examples I found on German Wikipedia - "Zum Beispiel das Verb für „sagen“, das mehrere Stämme hat:

eubneba (Präsens) „er sagt es ihm“,
’et’q’vis (Futur) „er wird es ihm sagen“,
utxra (Aorist) „er sagte es ihm/hat es ihm gesagt“,
utkvams (Perfekt) „er hat es ihm (offensichtlich) gesagt“."

Looks scary!

And here's a nice YT channel for those who want to learn some basics:

https://www.youtube.com/user/beqnikason

And this Funk Nova episode about Bertha von Suttner:

https://www.deutschlandfunknova.de/beit ... on-suttner
5 x

User avatar
Chmury
Green Belt
Posts: 316
Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2015 9:43 am
Languages: English (N)
Castellano (Adv)
German (Int)
Dutch (Int)
Polski - currently inactive, but I will return to it
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1516
x 646

Re: AroAro's log Pусский and עברית

Postby Chmury » Thu Jan 21, 2021 1:43 am

Alter, ich hatte keine Ahnung, dass du so viele Sprachen gleichzeitig lerntest! Wie schaffst du das alles? Und wie gelingt es dir, Fortschritt in jeden Sprache zu machen? Ich mühe mich damit ab, nur in zwei davon gleichzeitig Fortschritt zu machen. Welche Sprachen sind deinen Schwerpunkt zur Zeit?
Und ich stimme zu. Georgisch sieht sehr interessant aus, aber es wäre sicher eine echte Herausforderung.
2 x

User avatar
AroAro
Orange Belt
Posts: 110
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 12:57 pm
Languages: Native - Polish
Advanced - English, French, Italian
Intermediate - German, Romanian
Beginner - Russian, Hebrew
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... d80b60a5e9
x 319

Re: AroAro's log Pусский and עברית

Postby AroAro » Thu Jan 21, 2021 8:07 am

Chmury wrote:Alter, ich hatte keine Ahnung, dass du so viele Sprachen gleichzeitig lerntest! Wie schaffst du das alles? Und wie gelingt es dir, Fortschritt in jeden Sprache zu machen? Ich mühe mich damit ab, nur in zwei davon gleichzeitig Fortschritt zu machen. Welche Sprachen sind deinen Schwerpunkt zur Zeit?
Und ich stimme zu. Georgisch sieht sehr interessant aus, aber es wäre sicher eine echte Herausforderung.


Eigentlich, lerne ich gleichzeitig nur Russisch und Hebräisch. Ich verbringe jeden Tag max. 20-30 Minuten für jede Sprache, also insgesamt ich widme eine Stunde täglich zum Studium. Ich kann nicht mehr Zeit dazu widmen, weil ich schnell müde werde :) dazu kommt auch die Zeit, die ich verbringe um meine anderen Sprachen an einer akzeptablen Stufe zu behalten. Jeden Tag, lese ich eine Seite und schaue mich ein Video an auf eine der anderen Sprachen (Englisch, Französisch, Italienisch, Deutsch oder Rumänisch) - also jeden Tag ist es eine andere Sprache. Ich brauche dazu 20 Minuten, aber ich mache es meistens indem ich arbeite und habe eine Pause. Und am Abend, gegen 21-22 Uhr, höre ich zu einem Podcast auf Deutsch oder Rumänisch, weil ich möchte meine Hörfähigkeiten in diesen beiden Sprachen immer noch verbessern.
Und ja, ich benutze keine "social media" und stattdessen, lese ich Artikeln auf meine Fremdsprachen auf dem Smartphone. Und noch eine Dinge - ich lese gerne Bücher und ich habe eine "Reihenfolge" aufgebaut, nach der ich lese - also ein Buch auf Polnisch, dann auf Englisch, dann auf Französisch und so weiter.

Also zusammenfassend, konzentriere ich mich jetzt auf Russisch und Hebräisch, aber ich verbringe noch ziemlich viel Zeit für Deutsch und Rumänisch. Ich lerne gerne Fremdsprachen, vielleicht ich spreche sie nicht fliessend aber mir gefällt der "Prozess" des Studiums, wenn ich eine neue Sprache entschlüsseln kann und wenn ich immer mehr, mit jedem Tag, davon verstehen kann. Und es gibt noch mehrere Sprachen (vielliecht sogar zu viele Sprachen), die ich entdecken will!
4 x

User avatar
AroAro
Orange Belt
Posts: 110
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 12:57 pm
Languages: Native - Polish
Advanced - English, French, Italian
Intermediate - German, Romanian
Beginner - Russian, Hebrew
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... d80b60a5e9
x 319

Re: AroAro's log Pусский and עברית

Postby AroAro » Fri Jan 22, 2021 7:08 am

WEEKLY UPDATE

Hebrew - Assimil lesson 32. I will need to check how the preposition "et" אֶת is used in Hebrew. It's supposed to introduce a direct object in a sentence but it seems it's not used after each verb that presumably requires a direct object. Or even in some sentences it's there but in other sentences it's not there, even though these sentences are built around the same verb! for example the verb "to see" לִרְאוֹת

Russian - Assimil lesson 48. I started reading "Petersburg. Miasto snu" by Joanna Czeczott. It's in Polish but I think I can mention it here because it's a non-fiction book about Saint Petersburg, its history and inhabitants. The first chapter was about the Finno-Ugric nations that had lived in the area before the Swedes and Russians took it over. So the land was home to the smallest of the Finno-Ugric nations, namely Votes, and the author describes the fight they are leading right now to preserve their culture and language.

English - I read p.65 from Time and I watched only one YT video (by Lindie Botes) but I finished reading "White Teeth" by Zadie Smith. Hmm, it was not the most pleasurable reads of my life. I considered putting it away in the middle but still managed somehow to read it till the end. Honestly, I'm not sure if it was worth my time and maybe next time, if a book is not to my liking after 100 pages or 20% of the volume, I should simply give up? There are so many books to be read and spending my time on "ok-ish" books may be too much of a sacrifice. On the other hand, I don't like to leave things unfinished/undone, but I think I'll need to adapt and be more flexible.

French - read p.73 from Le Point, listened to 1 hour of France Info

Italian - read p.80-83 from L'Espresso, listened to "Caffe Europa" from Radio Rai 1

German - read p.57-60 from Der Spiegel, watched 2 videos by MrWissen2go, listened to 1 "Zeit Verbrechen" episode, 1 "Weltempfanger", 1 "Einhundert" and 1 "Echo der Welt" (plus listening to NDR Info in the background while working)

Romanian - read 3 articles from Deutche Welle Romanian Service, watched 1 video by "Atentie cad mere", 1 episode of "Romania te iubesc", 1 "Punctul pe azi" (again an interview with Maia Sandu, I like her accent) and 2 "Telejurnal"

And here is a pic of my new arrivals I talked about last time, all the books have finally been delivered this week (sorry for the low resolution):

Krizom3.PNG
Krizom3.PNG (203.72 KiB) Viewed 274 times
4 x

User avatar
Deinonysus
Blue Belt
Posts: 888
Joined: Tue Sep 13, 2016 6:06 pm
Location: Salem, MA, USA
Languages:  
• Native: English
• Advanced: French
• Intermediate: German,
   Spanish
• Beginner: Icelandic,
   Italian, Indonesian,
   Hebrew
x 2883

Re: AroAro's log Pусский and עברית

Postby Deinonysus » Fri Jan 22, 2021 3:00 pm

AroAro wrote:Hebrew - Assimil lesson 32. I will need to check how the preposition "et" אֶת is used in Hebrew. It's supposed to introduce a direct object in a sentence but it seems it's not used after each verb that presumably requires a direct object. Or even in some sentences it's there but in other sentences it's not there, even though these sentences are built around the same verb! for example the verb "to see" לִרְאוֹת

You only use את before a definite direct object, that may be your point of confusion.

אני רואה תפוח.‏
I see an apple.

אני רואה את התפוח.‏
I see the apple.

אני רואה את אברהם.‏
I see Abraham.

(Proper nouns are considered to be definite even if they don't start with the definite article ה).
2 x
Corrections welcomed!

: 224 / 608 Duolingo German
: 2 / 100 Assimil L'allemend

User avatar
AroAro
Orange Belt
Posts: 110
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 12:57 pm
Languages: Native - Polish
Advanced - English, French, Italian
Intermediate - German, Romanian
Beginner - Russian, Hebrew
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... d80b60a5e9
x 319

Re: AroAro's log Pусский and עברית

Postby AroAro » Fri Jan 22, 2021 5:52 pm

Deinonysus wrote:
AroAro wrote:Hebrew - Assimil lesson 32. I will need to check how the preposition "et" אֶת is used in Hebrew. It's supposed to introduce a direct object in a sentence but it seems it's not used after each verb that presumably requires a direct object. Or even in some sentences it's there but in other sentences it's not there, even though these sentences are built around the same verb! for example the verb "to see" לִרְאוֹת

You only use את before a definite direct object, that may be your point of confusion.

אני רואה תפוח.‏
I see an apple.

אני רואה את התפוח.‏
I see the apple.

אני רואה את אברהם.‏
I see Abraham.

(Proper nouns are considered to be definite even if they don't start with the definite article ה).


Thank you for the explanation, it now makes sense.

This preposition was introduced in the lesson 17 with the comment "et est une particule qui précède le complément d'objet direct (COD) déterminé". I must have missed the word "déterminé", and besides there were no additional examples with the preposition, so that didn't help either.
2 x

User avatar
Chmury
Green Belt
Posts: 316
Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2015 9:43 am
Languages: English (N)
Castellano (Adv)
German (Int)
Dutch (Int)
Polski - currently inactive, but I will return to it
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1516
x 646

Re: AroAro's log Pусский and עברית

Postby Chmury » Sun Jan 24, 2021 8:28 pm

AroAro wrote:Eigentlich, lerne ich gleichzeitig nur Russisch und Hebräisch. Ich verbringe jeden Tag max. 20-30 Minuten für jede Sprache, also insgesamt ich widme eine Stunde täglich zum Studium. Ich kann nicht mehr Zeit dazu widmen, weil ich schnell müde werde :) dazu kommt auch die Zeit, die ich verbringe um meine anderen Sprachen an einer akzeptablen Stufe zu behalten. Jeden Tag, lese ich eine Seite und schaue mich ein Video an auf eine der anderen Sprachen (Englisch, Französisch, Italienisch, Deutsch oder Rumänisch) - also jeden Tag ist es eine andere Sprache. Ich brauche dazu 20 Minuten, aber ich mache es meistens indem ich arbeite und habe eine Pause. Und am Abend, gegen 21-22 Uhr, höre ich zu einem Podcast auf Deutsch oder Rumänisch, weil ich möchte meine Hörfähigkeiten in diesen beiden Sprachen immer noch verbessern.
Und ja, ich benutze keine "social media" und stattdessen, lese ich Artikeln auf meine Fremdsprachen auf dem Smartphone. Und noch eine Dinge - ich lese gerne Bücher und ich habe eine "Reihenfolge" aufgebaut, nach der ich lese - also ein Buch auf Polnisch, dann auf Englisch, dann auf Französisch und so weiter.


Sehr beeindruckend wie veranstaltet dein Ansatz und Umgang mit all den Sprachen sind. Man muss ja viel Selbstbeherrschung haben um sich mit so viele Sprachen auf dem Laufendem zu bleiben. Es fällt mir noch ziemlich schwer, meine Zeit zwischen mehreren Sprachen aufzuteilen, auch wenn ich nur zwei lerne. Ich gerate immer in die Falle, dass sofort ich das Fortschrittsgefühl spüre, will ich nur mit der Sprache, in der ich gegenwärtig arbeite und Fortschritt spüre, weitermachen, und infolgedessen leidet meine andere Sprache. Ich denke, ich muss das Gesamtbild vor Augen haben, statt mich so häufig in dem gegenwärtigen Moment zu verlaufen (beziehungsweise, mehr Selbstbeherrschung haben) oder von dem Fortschrittsgefühl betrunken zu werden, sozusagen.

AroAro wrote:Also zusammenfassend, konzentriere ich mich jetzt auf Russisch und Hebräisch, aber ich verbringe noch ziemlich viel Zeit für Deutsch und Rumänisch. Ich lerne gerne Fremdsprachen, vielleicht ich spreche sie nicht fliessend aber mir gefällt der "Prozess" des Studiums, wenn ich eine neue Sprache entschlüsseln kann und wenn ich immer mehr, mit jedem Tag, davon verstehen kann. Und es gibt noch mehrere Sprachen (vielliecht sogar zu viele Sprachen), die ich entdecken will!


Ja das verstehe ich all zu gut. Ich liebe auch den Prozess einer Sprache zu entdecken und zu lernen, und ich liebe, wenn ich diesen Fortschritt sehen und spüren kann und die Sprache wird immer verständlicher. Ich werde sogar sagen, dass ich ein bisschen (oder ziemlich viel) süchtig danach geworden bin, weil wenn ich ein besonders guten Tag haben, was meine Sprachen betrifft, kriege ich viel Energie davon und ich bin immer sehr gut drauf nach einem ergiebigen Zeitraum Fremdsprachenlernens. Hast du jemals das Buch Flow von Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi gelesen? Sehr empfehlenswert. Ich glaube, es erklärt vieles, was in dieser Gespräch aufgetaucht sind.

Einen schönen Tag noch AroAro.
4 x


Return to “Language logs”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests