Lucubrationes

Continue or start your personal language log here, including logs for challenge participants
Theodisce
Orange Belt
Posts: 221
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2015 9:18 am
Location: Germany
Languages: Polish (native), speaks: English, Czech, German, Russian, French, Spanish, Italian. Writes in: Latin. Understands: Ancient Greek, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Slovak, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian/Croatian. Studies for passive competence in: Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1435
x 431

Lucubrationes

Postby Theodisce » Sun Oct 11, 2015 5:21 pm

I used to have a log on the old forum; recently I started visiting it and updating my log again only to discover that the main activity has moved here. I will repost two my French language posts I wrote several days ago to proceed smoothly to the new adventures (writing in foreign languages is something that tastes like adventure).

Plans for next 8 months


German
In the months to come I would like to achieve a solid C1 in spoken and written German, the task that seems achievable as I've devoted 1380 hours to the language in the past two years and now I'll be living in Germany. I will be happy if I can manage to do about 21 hours of German weekly (this includes both output and input activities given that I concentrate on them). If I can stick to that, by the end of June 2016 I will have devoted about 2000 hours to the German language, which should account for C1. I bought myself a grammar book and I will be using flashcards.

French

Hours studied till now: 625. 8 months is more or less 200 days, so I'm stating as my goal to achieve 900 hours of study in total (1,3 hour per day). I will probably not score that much, but who knows?

Spanish

With 190 I understand most of the thing I read or listen to, but it will be great to develop the active skills as well. If I can add to my 190 hours another 110 it will be a good point of departure for what will presumably be my second active romance language.

English, Czech, Russian, Latin, Ancient Greek

I don't like the concept of maintaining a language. If you continue to add new things to what you've already learned, we are dealing with improvement and not with the mere maintenance. So that's what I'll be basically doing, mostly by input and occasionally also by output.


Portuguese, Italian, Modern Greek, Serbian/Croatian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Slovak


Those are my passive languages. With 60-200 hours devoted to a language belonging to family you are acquainted with it is easy both to understand the topics you have interest it and to ignore other things :). Slow growth is what will be taking place in this group and perhaps the possibility will open for this or that species to evolve into something more advanced.

Dutch, Slovene, Bulgarian, Romanian, Macedonian, Norwegian (?)

Now we've arrived at the very bottom. Here is where I struggle not to express myself, but to understand others. Dutch is likely to get a promotion in the coming months. Actually, yesterday I read many Dutch Wiki articles about the Dutch renaissance painting and understood most of the content. Not that bad.
Last edited by Theodisce on Mon Nov 06, 2017 8:14 am, edited 2 times in total.
4 x
GER 5000+ : 375 / 1000
FRA 2100+ : 38 / 100
RUS 1800+ : 42 / 100
CZE 1700+ : 09 / 100
SPA 1100+ : 50 / 100
ITA 750+ : 18 / 50
ELL 600+ : 61 / 100
BCS 373+ : 23 / 50

Theodisce
Orange Belt
Posts: 221
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2015 9:18 am
Location: Germany
Languages: Polish (native), speaks: English, Czech, German, Russian, French, Spanish, Italian. Writes in: Latin. Understands: Ancient Greek, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Slovak, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian/Croatian. Studies for passive competence in: Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1435
x 431

Re: Lucubrationes

Postby Theodisce » Sun Oct 11, 2015 5:24 pm

Reserved.
0 x
GER 5000+ : 375 / 1000
FRA 2100+ : 38 / 100
RUS 1800+ : 42 / 100
CZE 1700+ : 09 / 100
SPA 1100+ : 50 / 100
ITA 750+ : 18 / 50
ELL 600+ : 61 / 100
BCS 373+ : 23 / 50

Theodisce
Orange Belt
Posts: 221
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2015 9:18 am
Location: Germany
Languages: Polish (native), speaks: English, Czech, German, Russian, French, Spanish, Italian. Writes in: Latin. Understands: Ancient Greek, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Slovak, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian/Croatian. Studies for passive competence in: Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1435
x 431

Re: Lucubrationes

Postby Theodisce » Sun Oct 11, 2015 5:27 pm

Two French language posts from the HTLAL log:

Le français était la premier langue vivante que j’essayais d’apprendre en autodidacte (j'ai appris le latin comme ça, mais c'est une chose très différante- je ne dirais pas que le latin soit mort, je l'appellerais plutôt une langue végétant). Je l'ai appris suffisamment bien pour pouvoir lire les textes concertantes choses comme l'histoire, la religion, la philologie, mais je n'ai pas essayé ni de l'écouter, ni de le parler. Voici l’état des choses qui se maintenait a partir de l'an 2009 jusqu’à le fin de l’année 2012, c'est-à-dire jusqu’au moment où j'ai pris la décision d'améliorer ma première langue néolatine. J’écoutais beaucoup des émissions radio et des cours de l’université, mais les livres audio étaient encore trop difficiles (ou peut-être je n'avais pas l’accès aux livres suffisamment intéressantes, qui sait?) Mais en 2013 c’était beaucoup plus le tchèque qu'a captivé mon attention et après ça c’était le russe que je voulais améliorer. Maintenait j'ai les connaissances passives du portugais, de l'italien, je peux utiliser l'espagnol activement dans une manière limité, mais mon français, faible qu'il soit, reste la langue néolatine que je connais le mieux.

Alors, jusqu’à maintenait j'ai consacré environ 620 heures a l’étude du français, par "l’étude" je comprends ici, en suivant la méthode de Steve Kaufmann, tout le contact avec une langue. Quand au russe et a l'allemand, j'ai commencé a les utiliser activement seulement quand j'ai consacré environ 1000 heures a chaque. Mais avec le français, je ne veux pas d'attendre aussi longtemps.

Toutes les corrections seront appréciées.

À présent, je consacre environ 7 heures à l’étude du français chaque semaine. Il me manque probablement environ 300 heures de l’étude pour achever le niveau que je jugerais suffisant. J’espère que ça se passera vers septembre de 2016. Quand ce temps arrivera, j'aurai consacré environ 300 heures à l’étude d'espagnol, ce que constituera un bon point de départ pour cette langue. Mais de temps en temps j'essaye d’améliorer mes autres langues latines, par exemple le roumain. Tout le monde sait que le roumain, ayant reçu des influences slaves, est une langue latine à part. Alors, mon journal me dit que j'ai eu 29 heures de contact avec cette langue. Par comparaison, la chiffre pour le portugais est 45. Ces 29 heures, a quoi servent elles? I y a des articles de la Wikipédia roumaine que je comprends aussi dans leur intégralité, il y a des autres dont je ne comprends que les parties essentielles. Et les livres audio? Ici la situation est très similaire, avec la différence que il y a plus des chapitres que je ne comprends que partiellement. La conclusion est très banal: le portugais est moins difficile à comprendre que le roumain, même pour une personne qui connaît des langues slaves (le polonais aide très peu dans la compréhension du roumain, au même temps le rousse et le serbo-croate facilitent l'étude des mots d'origine slave- ou plutôt d'origine slavon).


The log:

http://how-to-learn-any-language.com/fo ... PN=1&TPN=2
2 x
GER 5000+ : 375 / 1000
FRA 2100+ : 38 / 100
RUS 1800+ : 42 / 100
CZE 1700+ : 09 / 100
SPA 1100+ : 50 / 100
ITA 750+ : 18 / 50
ELL 600+ : 61 / 100
BCS 373+ : 23 / 50

Theodisce
Orange Belt
Posts: 221
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2015 9:18 am
Location: Germany
Languages: Polish (native), speaks: English, Czech, German, Russian, French, Spanish, Italian. Writes in: Latin. Understands: Ancient Greek, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Slovak, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian/Croatian. Studies for passive competence in: Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1435
x 431

Re: Lucubrationes

Postby Theodisce » Wed Oct 21, 2015 1:44 pm

So... Ich bin jetzt in Tübingen, wohne in einem netten Hotel und suche nach eine Wohnung. Oder nach ein Zimmer. Oder nach irgendwelchen Platz, wo ich mein Haupt hinlege. Die Gesprächsgelegenheiten sind begrenzt: es gibt viele "Kleingespräche" : im Hotel, im Restaurant, in der Buchhandlung, aber kaum etwas, das es überschreiten könnte. Ich finde es hochinteressant, das meine Ausdrucksmöglichkeiten in längeren Gesprächen besser zum Ausdruck kommen. Aber so ist es einfach- ich habe viele Vorlesungen gehört, aber kaum irgendwelche TV-Serien gesehen. Ich mache weiter. Ich weiß, dass die Meisterschaft nur mit Übungen kommt. Und die Grundlagen habe ich schon seit lange gelegt. Noch eine letzte Bemerkung- die Leute sind in eine überraschende Wiese nett und hilfsbereit.
4 x
GER 5000+ : 375 / 1000
FRA 2100+ : 38 / 100
RUS 1800+ : 42 / 100
CZE 1700+ : 09 / 100
SPA 1100+ : 50 / 100
ITA 750+ : 18 / 50
ELL 600+ : 61 / 100
BCS 373+ : 23 / 50

Theodisce
Orange Belt
Posts: 221
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2015 9:18 am
Location: Germany
Languages: Polish (native), speaks: English, Czech, German, Russian, French, Spanish, Italian. Writes in: Latin. Understands: Ancient Greek, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Slovak, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian/Croatian. Studies for passive competence in: Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1435
x 431

Re: Lucubrationes

Postby Theodisce » Thu Oct 22, 2015 1:13 pm

In fünf Tagen habe ich 20 Stunden mit der deutschen Sprache in Rahmen der Immersion erlebt. Es ist für mich schwer oder vielleicht unmöglich mehr als 4 Stunden pro Tag einer Sprache zu widmen. Das kann aber von der Tatsache abhängig sein, dass ich unter Zeitdruck stehe und bisher die Frage der Wohnung nicht erlösen konnte. In ersten 2 Tagen habe ich viel auf Polnisch gelesen. Es erinnert mich an die Situation die ich im Tschechien erlebt habe: da habe ich auch mehr auf Polnisch gelesen und angehört als zu Hause. Der Umgang mit der Muttersprache scheint ein Stressreduzierener Faktor zu sein. Andererseits aber ist es wunderbar hier zu sein, in einer Sprachumgebung wo man ständig etwas neues lernt- seien es Werbeschilder oder Namen der Geschäften. Gestern habe ich Plato auf Griechisch gelesen und kann sagen, dass ich dabei viel Spaß hatte.
2 x
GER 5000+ : 375 / 1000
FRA 2100+ : 38 / 100
RUS 1800+ : 42 / 100
CZE 1700+ : 09 / 100
SPA 1100+ : 50 / 100
ITA 750+ : 18 / 50
ELL 600+ : 61 / 100
BCS 373+ : 23 / 50

Montmorency
Blue Belt
Posts: 935
Joined: Tue Oct 06, 2015 3:01 pm
Location: Oxfordshire, UK
Languages: English (Native)
Maintaining: German (active skills lapsed somewhat).
Studying: Welsh (advanced beginner/intermediate);
Re-started: Norwegian ("false" beginner (?))
Back-burner: Spanish (intermediate) Danish (beginner).

Have studied: Latin, French, Italian, Dutch; OT Hebrew (briefly) NT Greek (briefly); Norwegian (superficially).
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1429
x 905

Re: Lucubrationes

Postby Montmorency » Fri Oct 23, 2015 12:32 am

I am (very much) not a native speaker, but to me, as a fellow learner of German (for quite a few years), your German comes over as very natural, and it would not have surprised me if it had been written by a native speaker.

So your immersion experience has obviously been very successful.

(Hopefully a native speaker will confirm this in due course!).

Good luck in your endeavours.
1 x

Theodisce
Orange Belt
Posts: 221
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2015 9:18 am
Location: Germany
Languages: Polish (native), speaks: English, Czech, German, Russian, French, Spanish, Italian. Writes in: Latin. Understands: Ancient Greek, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Slovak, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian/Croatian. Studies for passive competence in: Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1435
x 431

Re: Lucubrationes

Postby Theodisce » Fri Oct 23, 2015 6:10 pm

Montmorency wrote:I am (very much) not a native speaker, but to me, as a fellow learner of German (for quite a few years), your German comes over as very natural, and it would not have surprised me if it had been written by a native speaker.

So your immersion experience has obviously been very successful.

(Hopefully a native speaker will confirm this in due course!).

Good luck in your endeavours.



Thank you very much, what you wrote is very encouraging. Writing is the easier part- man kann nachdenken : ). As for speaking:

Heute habe ich ungefähr 4 Stunden Deutsch gesprochen. Bei dem letzten Gespräch, das nur 20 Minuten gedauert hat, habe ich mich zufrieden gefühlt. Bemerkenswert ist, dass ich mich für meine Sprache nicht geniert habe. Zum Vergleich: mit dem Tschechischen hat es sehr lange gedauert, bis ich mich zu genieren aufgehört habe. In Wahrheit habe ich dieses Gefühl seitdem ich nach Deutschland gekommen bin nicht erlebt.

Eine kleine Frage an die Muttersprachler: darf ich das Perfekt anwenden, wenn ich in informelle Wiese schriftlich über die Vergangenheit berichte, oder wird das Präteritum besser klingen?
0 x
GER 5000+ : 375 / 1000
FRA 2100+ : 38 / 100
RUS 1800+ : 42 / 100
CZE 1700+ : 09 / 100
SPA 1100+ : 50 / 100
ITA 750+ : 18 / 50
ELL 600+ : 61 / 100
BCS 373+ : 23 / 50

User avatar
Josquin
Blue Belt
Posts: 646
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 2:38 pm
Location: Germany
Languages: German (native); English (advanced fluency); French (basic fluency); Italian, Swedish, Russian, Irish (intermediate); Dutch, Icelandic, Japanese, Portuguese, Scottish Gaelic (beginner); Latin, Ancient Greek, Biblical Hebrew, Sanskrit (reading only)
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=737
x 1731

Re: Lucubrationes

Postby Josquin » Fri Oct 23, 2015 6:55 pm

Das Perfekt ist hier völlig in Ordnung. Der Unterschied zwischen Präteritum und Perfekt ist ziemlich subtil und daher schwer zu erklären. In deinem letzten Post hast du vor allem unzusammenhängende Fakten berichtet, deshalb klingt das Perfekt hier besser. Das Präteritum ist eher in einer zusammenhängenden Geschichte zu erwarten.

Darüber hinaus möchte ich mich Montmorencys Lob für dein gutes Deutsch anschließen. Ich würde zwar nicht so weit gehen, dass ich dich mit einem Muttersprachler verwechselt hätte (dafür gibt es dann doch zu viele, allerdings durchweg kleine Fehler), aber du sprichst und schreibst Deutsch wirklich auf hohem Niveau. Glückwunsch!
3 x
Oró, sé do bheatha abhaile! Anois ar theacht an tsamhraidh.

Theodisce
Orange Belt
Posts: 221
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2015 9:18 am
Location: Germany
Languages: Polish (native), speaks: English, Czech, German, Russian, French, Spanish, Italian. Writes in: Latin. Understands: Ancient Greek, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Slovak, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian/Croatian. Studies for passive competence in: Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1435
x 431

Re: Lucubrationes

Postby Theodisce » Sun Feb 07, 2016 12:21 pm

Josquin, vielen Dank für deine Antwort und die Einschätzung meiner Sprachkenntnisse. Entschuldigst du, bitte, dass ich erst heute antworte. Seit November musste ich mich auf das Leben in Deutschland und auf neue berufliche Anforderungen anpassen. Und es ist schon so, dass wenn man aufgehört hat, neue Beiträge zu schreiben, ist es schwierig, es neu zu beginnen.

Die Zahl von Stunden, die ich der deutschen Sprache gewidmet habe, ist inzwischen von 1450 auf zirka 1800 aufgestiegen, also ungefähr 3,5 pro Tag (mein Urlaub habe ich zum Beispiel in Tschechien verbracht, wo ich kaum Deutsch benutzt habe).

Ich habe auch erste Konversationen auf französisch gehalten. Aus dieser Erfahrung würde ich folgenden Schluss ziehen: 700 Stunden ist für mich genug, um eine Sprache sprechen zu können, ohne dass ich dabei leiden müsste ;) . Das habe ich schon früher mit Tschechisch überprüft, das ist aber eine slawische Sprache, die man vermutlich leichter beherrschen kann. Jetzt möchte ich noch ein Schritt weiter gehen und Spanisch sprechen zu beginnen. Das wäre für mich etwas neues, nach 250 Stunden mit der aktiven Benutzung neuer Sprache anzufangen. Ich weiß noch nicht, ob ich mich dafür entschiede, aber das Video von Steve Kaufmann hat mich dafür begeistert:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gfPVDkY-8A
0 x
GER 5000+ : 375 / 1000
FRA 2100+ : 38 / 100
RUS 1800+ : 42 / 100
CZE 1700+ : 09 / 100
SPA 1100+ : 50 / 100
ITA 750+ : 18 / 50
ELL 600+ : 61 / 100
BCS 373+ : 23 / 50

Theodisce
Orange Belt
Posts: 221
Joined: Sun Oct 04, 2015 9:18 am
Location: Germany
Languages: Polish (native), speaks: English, Czech, German, Russian, French, Spanish, Italian. Writes in: Latin. Understands: Ancient Greek, Modern Greek, Portuguese, Slovak, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian/Croatian. Studies for passive competence in: Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1435
x 431

Re: Lucubrationes

Postby Theodisce » Mon Feb 08, 2016 4:18 pm

Es cierto que no he dedicado para el estudio del español tantas horas como, por ejemplo, para el estudio del francés. No obstante, durante los últimos anos este idioma me acompañaba cada mese. Creo que es importante poder vivir con un idioma que no estudiamos activamente durante dos o tres años. Es importante hacer algo con ese idioma de vez en cuando, lo que facilitara la "activación" de los conocimientos pasivos. Tengamos, por ejemplo, el griego moderno. Lo he estudiado durante mas o menos 200 horas, pero tenia mucho menos tiempo para dar al este idioma acceso a mi personalidad. Había periodos del estudio mas intensivo, cuando podría estudiar griego 20 horas a una semana, pero lo que me mancaba y manca todavía, es la inclusión de ese idioma en mías rutinas mensuales si non diarias. Pero es también verdad, que el español es una lengua mas transparente en lo que tiene a ver con el vocabulario, lo que facilita substancialmente el aprendizaje de eso idioma.
1 x
GER 5000+ : 375 / 1000
FRA 2100+ : 38 / 100
RUS 1800+ : 42 / 100
CZE 1700+ : 09 / 100
SPA 1100+ : 50 / 100
ITA 750+ : 18 / 50
ELL 600+ : 61 / 100
BCS 373+ : 23 / 50


Return to “Language logs”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Lawyer&Mom and 1 guest