Radioclare's 2020 log (Russian, Croatian)

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Radioclare
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Re: Radioclare's 2020 log (Russian, Croatian)

Postby Radioclare » Sun Oct 11, 2020 5:44 pm

11 October
A nice relaxing weekend day at home :)

Russian
Now that I've finished Colloquial Russian 2, my plan is to work my way through Schaum's Russian Grammar. I have used this book before, but only dipped in and out of it to practise specific things (mostly case endings) and it was quite a long time ago. I feel like what I really need at the moment is some grammar exercises to help me try and fix correct endings and declensions in my mind and I'm hoping this book is going to be good for that.

I started with the first chapter this morning which is mostly about the alphabet, stress, pronunciation etc. I think I have read this chapter once before and found it a bit overwhelming (especially the section on voicing/devoicing, a topic which always stresses me out!). So I'm encouraged that when I read it today, I felt like it mostly made sense.

I also realised from looking at my spreadsheet that it was the start of August since I last read anything in Russian, so I've started a new book. I withstood the temptation to start another Twilight novel and instead am reading 'Горе невинным' (Ordeal by Innocence) by Agatha Christie. I don't think I've read this story in English before, so it's all new to me. Unlike with the Croatian book I finished yesterday, I'm not looking up all the words I don't know in this one; if I was I'd probably still be on the first page :lol: I've only looked up a handful of words which were seriously hindering my understanding of the plot, like грузовик (lorry, truck). The main thing confusing me at the moment is the surname of the main characters. The book is about a family, where the son has been convicted of murdering the mother and subsequently died in prison, but new evidence has come to light to suggest he had an alibi for the time of the murder. So there are lots of family members with the same surname, which is spelled as "Эрджайл" in Russian, and I cannot for the life of me figure out what this surname can have been in the original English version. Suggestions welcome :lol:

Total - Russian: 130 mins
3 x
Croatian SC books: 29 / 100 Croatian SC films: 41 / 100
Russian SC books: 31 / 100 Russian SC films: 27 / 100

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Re: Radioclare's 2020 log (Russian, Croatian)

Postby Ingaræð » Sun Oct 11, 2020 6:02 pm

Radioclare wrote:So there are lots of family members with the same surname, which is spelled as "Эрджайл" in Russian, and I cannot for the life of me figure out what this surname can have been in the original English version. Suggestions welcome :lol:

Good lord, I'm not surprised - the original surname is Argyle! :shock:

Have you ever tried a parallel text? It's like having instant dictionary look-ups, but takes only minutes to set up. I'm currently using one for 'The Man in the Brown Suit': 1st column is the Russian translation; 2nd column is the Russian translated back into English (via DeepL); and the 3rd is the original English. (And also Russian audiobook, because L-R.)
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Re: Radioclare's 2020 log (Russian, Croatian)

Postby Radioclare » Sun Oct 11, 2020 9:36 pm

Ingaræð wrote:Good lord, I'm not surprised - the original surname is Argyle! :shock:

Have you ever tried a parallel text? It's like having instant dictionary look-ups, but takes only minutes to set up. I'm currently using one for 'The Man in the Brown Suit': 1st column is the Russian translation; 2nd column is the Russian translated back into English (via DeepL); and the 3rd is the original English. (And also Russian audiobook, because L-R.)


Wow, I would never have guessed Argyle in a million years :shock: I guess the translator must have misunderstood what sort of sound the g was supposed to represent!

No, have never tried a parallel text! How do you go about making them? I'm guessing you have to acquire a pdf of a book in both languages. The book I'm reading at the moment is a physical one which my boyfriend bought for me in Russia last year.
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Croatian SC books: 29 / 100 Croatian SC films: 41 / 100
Russian SC books: 31 / 100 Russian SC films: 27 / 100

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Re: Radioclare's 2020 log (Russian, Croatian)

Postby iguanamon » Sun Oct 11, 2020 11:12 pm

First, you know I've been following your log for a long time, ever since you were doing your first novela in Croatian. Love the music videos too. I add my congratulations on finishing the second volume of Colloquial Russian. Well done!

Yes, you'll need an original English source, something from which you can copy and paste. Your pdf must have ocr text. You can test it by moving your cursor over a word and highlighting it. You can also copy text from an epub, or kindle format e-book.

The simple "down and dirty" way to make a parallel text is to open a text document first. I use OpenOffice.
Next, insert a table and define how many columns you want. I don't use the third column, as I don't trust machine translation well enough yet, though maybe I should start trusting it more. So I choose two columns. Next, then hit "spacebar" to move your cursor over one space, then hit "enter" and move your cursor to the next line. Do this in both columns. Then copy and paste Russian (TL) into column 1. ( When doing a book, I like to copy maybe a dozen pages max at a time, which I can turn into a parallel text in about 10 minutes manually.) Then highlight all the text in column 1 and make the font one you like and the font size from 10-12 works pretty well. For the next column, repeat the procedure with English (L1). When finished, I print the text to pdf and put it on my tablet. You'll end up with something like this:
Dashiell Hammet- Collita roja wrote:Catalan
Temps enrera havia preparat una o dues morts,
quan eren necessàries. Però aquesta és la primera
vegada que m'hi trobo entrampat. És aquesta
maleïda ciutat. Aquí, és que no pots anar de dret.
Al començament ja em vaig veure embolicat.
Quan el vell Elihu recorregué a mi no podia fer
altra cosa que enfrontar els malfactors l'un contra
l'altre. Vaig haver d'orientar el treball de la millor
manera que vaig saber. Què podia fer-hi si de la
millor manera volia dir arribar a una matança?
Altrament sense el suport d'Elihu la feina no podia
fer-se.
—Si no podies fer-hi res, per què carat et
lamentes, ara? Tu beu, i prou.
Em vaig beure la meitat del got i vaig sentir la
necessitat de continuar parlant
"I've arranged a killing or two in my time, when
they were necessary. But this is the first time I've
ever got the fever. It's this damned burg. You can't
go straight here. I got myself tangled at the
beginning. When old Elihu ran out on me there
was nothing I could do but try to set the boys
against each other. I had to swing the job the best
way I could. How could I help it if the best way
was bound to lead to a lot of killing? The job
couldn't be handled any other way without Elihu's
backing."
.
"Well, if you couldn't help it, what's the use of
making a lot of fuss over it? Drink your drink."
I drank half of it and felt the urge to talk some
more.

It helps to know the language you are working with well enough to know where the text should line up, when doing this manually. Bear in mind that some languages use a lower amount of text to say the same thing we say in English, and some use more text. I usually read the parallel text on a tablet. Of course, a human translation will not be literal because it has to be readable by its intended readership.

I'm currently reading "Red Harvest" by Dashiell Hammet. In the first half of the book, I was looking up a lot of vocabulary that I couldn't deduce by context, and checking my guesses against the parallel text. I am about 80% finished with the book. New vocabulary is not as frequent. Now, I am highlighting turns of phrase and idioms much more. The advantage of reading on a tablet is being able to enlarge the L2 to fill the screen, then you can easily slide over to the L1 to confirm guesses or read ahead, if you want.

A parallel text does make it easier to read. If you make it through this Agatha Christie book, you'll find that you will have less need to look up vocabulary in the next one. Authors and translators have their own voices.
GlobalVoices.org wrote:Russian
Сирийский беженец искал надежду и свободу, поборов все сложности, с которыми он столкнулся лицом к лицу, пока добирался до Испании. А здесь — снова заключение, но на этот раз из-за вспышки COVID-19.


Мы не готовы. У нас нет ни масок, ни перчаток, ни стерилизующих средств, кроме мыла с ароматом тревоги.



Мы немного взволнованы появлением этой маленькой невидимой твари под названием коронавирус. Но считаем, что она слишком мала, чтобы нанести ущерб организму, который уже перенёс психологические и физические страдания в родной стране, Сирии, затем перебрался по контрабандистским дорогам через Турцию и оказался в сложных условиях в Испании, учитывая карантин, который никто не мог предвидеть.
A Syrian refugee is searching for hope and freedom after all the difficulties he faced on his journey from Syria to Spain, only to face the unexpected: yet another confinement, but this time due to the outbreak of COVID-19.

We are not ready. We don’t have masks, nor gloves to cover those little hands or anything to sterilize them with other than some soap mixed with anxiety.

We are a little concerned about this tiny invisible being called the Coronavirus. We believe it is too small to hurt those bodies that have already endured tremendous psychological and physical suffering in their native country, Syria, then once again on the smuggling routes through Turkey and finally in an environment of instability in Spain, right down to a quarantine that was never foreseen.

Source Побег от смерти в Сирии в карантин в Мадриде
От заключения в Сирии — к заключению в Испании
Перевод опубликован 7 Октябрь 2020 13:04 GMT


From death in Syria to quarantine in Madrid
The journey from confinement in Syria to confinement in Spain
Translation posted 28 August 2020 14:18 GMT


Here's the English translation from Russian in DeepL
DeepL wrote:The Syrian refugee was looking for hope and freedom as he struggled face to face as he made his way to Spain. And here again he is imprisoned, but this time because of the COVID-19 outbreak.

We are not ready. We have no masks, no gloves, no sterilizing agents, except soap with the scent of anxiety.

We are a little excited about this little invisible creature called coronavirus. But we believe that it is too small to damage the body, which has already endured psychological and physical suffering in its home country, Syria, then crossed the smuggling roads through Turkey and found itself in difficult conditions in Spain, given the quarantine, which no one could have foreseen.
Translated with http://www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

Words I think I may have learned from the parallel text (thanks to Serpent and Vadim, I learned to read Cyrillic from thier tweets). Parallel texts can be a very useful tool:
Сирийский: Syrian
Испании: Spain
масок: mask
Мы: We
Мы не готовы: We are not ready
стерилизующих: sterilize
коронавирус: corona virus
психологические и физические: psychological and physical
Сирии: Syria
Турцию: Turkey
карантин: quarantine
From DeepL (This article was translated from Arabic into both Russian and English)
ароматом: aromatic/aroma/scent?
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Re: Radioclare's 2020 log (Russian, Croatian)

Postby Ingaræð » Mon Oct 12, 2020 7:54 pm

I use a different, mostly automated method for creating parallel texts (partly because I prefer things that at least seem like they require less effort...), which I think can be more efficient if you're a beginner or at a lower level in your L2. If you don't want to go old school (2 physical books in front of you, side by side) then you just need the books in any kind of text file - epub, doc, pdf (OCR'd) etc. (fb2 seems to be a standard file type in Russian circles). I convert whatever I have to a .txt file either using Calibre or a word processor, then run the text files through LF Aligner (which takes about a minute) and print to pdf to get something like this:

ObI.png
ObI.png (162.02 KiB) Viewed 222 times


As you can see, the RU->EN DeepL translation (2nd column) aligns perfectly with the Russian translation, while the original (3rd) is sometimes a box above or below. It's not enough to be completely confusing, and in this case I prefer a faster production speed over perfect alignment. You can play around with settings to have the text presented however you prefer, e.g. English on the left (I usually have white text on a black background). One thing that I would suggest (and recommended by the creator of L-R) is to have each column no wider than 8 cm - it's much easier to keep on track as you read through. Also, you don't always need to convert to .txt for LF Aligner, but I think it usually produces the best results.

The creator of LF Aligner also has quite a few parallel texts already prepared, although currently the only one in Russian with an English translation is Anna Karenina.

Edit: There are a few links about creating parallel texts here.
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Re: Radioclare's 2020 log (Russian, Croatian)

Postby Radioclare » Mon Oct 12, 2020 10:36 pm

Wow, thank you both for taking the time to explain all that!! So much useful information about parallel texts, I really appreciate it :)

I've honestly never thought of making one before but it sounds like such a good idea. I'm very tempted to try it out with the next two books in the Twilight series, because I'm pretty sure I've already got files of the text in both languages. I may start by trying Ingaræð's hi-tech method and then revert to iguanamon's simpler method when I fail at it :lol:

***
12 October
I had four hours of technical training on Zoom this morning. Soul destroying!

Russian
I read another chapter of 'Горе невинным', which was 15 pages and took me around 30 minutes. So my reading speed in Russian is pretty slow, even with being too lazy to stop and look things up. One thing that freaks me out about reading in Russian is that I can guess the sense of a lot of words from Croatian, so I sometimes feel like I'm understanding the text without learning anything and that I might never improve, just always be stuck at the level of half-guessing Russian words from Croatian. Perhaps reading a few books with a parallel text will help with this!

I started the second chapter of Schaum's grammar, which has started with the blissfully simple subject of noun gender. So I got an ego boost from doing some Russian grammar exercises and actually getting them all right for a change :D

Croatian
I was going to be good and start watching my Russian series while cycling this week, but I was weak and gave into the temptation to watch another episode of 'Drugo ime ljubavi' this evening. I need to try and restore some balance to my TV-watching habits before my Croatian films challenge gets too ridiculously ahead of my Russian one.

Total - Russian: 67 mins, Croatian: 44 mins
3 x
Croatian SC books: 29 / 100 Croatian SC films: 41 / 100
Russian SC books: 31 / 100 Russian SC films: 27 / 100

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Re: Radioclare's 2020 log (Russian, Croatian)

Postby Radioclare » Tue Oct 13, 2020 10:10 pm

13 October
I was trying to finish something so I didn't stop working until 20.30 and that slightly ruined my evening.

Russian
No time for reading today but I continued with Schaum's grammar. The sections I studied today gave some guidelines for instances when nouns ending in the soft sign are likely to be masculine or feminine. Not rocket science, but this was the most complete treatment of that topic that I've seen anywhere, so it was useful to read.

Croatian
Oops, I watched another episode of 'Drugo ime ljubavi' :oops: It was because I was cold and tired and indulging my obsession with this series was the only way I could make myself do any exercise :lol:

Total - Russian: 33 mins, Croatian: 44 mins
2 x
Croatian SC books: 29 / 100 Croatian SC films: 41 / 100
Russian SC books: 31 / 100 Russian SC films: 27 / 100

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Re: Radioclare's 2020 log (Russian, Croatian)

Postby JohannaNYC » Wed Oct 14, 2020 1:29 am

Someone told me about this website for Serbian podcasts https://podcast.rs/

I haven't listened to any of them, so I have no idea about the quality.
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Re: Radioclare's 2020 log (Russian, Croatian)

Postby Radioclare » Wed Oct 14, 2020 9:54 pm

Thanks for the link, JohannaNYC - it's exciting to know that Serbian podcasts do actually exist :D

14 October 2020
I was in meetings most of the morning, which wasn't terribly productive. I managed to finish work around 19.30 but then I had a headache so I haven't achieved as much this evening as I hoped.

Russian
Continuing with the section on gender in Schaum's grammar. Today was all about nouns for different professions and specifically what endings adjectives take for nouns which are masculine in terms of their grammatical gender, but used to describe both males and females.

I also read another chapter of 'Горе невинным', which was only around 10 pages. Today's new words was "скверный", which seems to mean bad or nasty. I looked it up because initially it made me think of the Croatian word "škver", which is like a place where you build and repair ships... I don't even know what the correct word for this is in English... maybe a shipyard :? Anyway, looking it up established that there's absolutely no link between the two words :lol:

Total - Russian: 48 mins
3 x
Croatian SC books: 29 / 100 Croatian SC films: 41 / 100
Russian SC books: 31 / 100 Russian SC films: 27 / 100

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Re: Radioclare's 2020 log (Russian, Croatian)

Postby cjareck » Thu Oct 15, 2020 7:04 am

Radioclare wrote: I looked it up because initially it made me think of the Croatian word "škver", which is like a place where you build and repair ships... I don't even know what the correct word for this is in English... maybe a shipyard :?

Interestingly, we have a Polish "skwer" but it is taken from an English square and means "city square". The equivalent of a shipyard is "stocznia," which seems to be our original word ;)
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