Sarnek's log - Deutsch/Svenska

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Sarnek
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Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2015 8:55 am
Location: Rossano, Italy
Languages: Italian (N), English (Fluent), Swedish (Advanced-), German (Intermediate-)
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Sarnek's log - Deutsch/Svenska

Postby Sarnek » Sun Aug 23, 2015 9:44 am

Here we go again.

I've been lurking in the shadows while the whole situation with the forums would be solved (I actually didn't have much to post about, I have done next to nil in July/August). Now the situation seems pretty stable and I've decided to move here as well.

My story in short. I'm 20, from Italy, language nerd, and study Swedish and German at university. I've recently moved to Sweden as I've won an Erasmus scholarship and I'll be spending about a year in Lund, in the South of Sweden, studying at Lund's University.
Right now I'm obviously pretty busy with moving in and other stuff, but I'm looking forward to posting about my language-learning progress in here as soon as all the dust has settled.
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Sarnek
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Re: Sarnek's log - Deutsch/Svenska

Postby Sarnek » Thu Aug 27, 2015 1:36 pm

Finally one day with nothing to do. It's probably about time I updated my log, both for my own sake, so that I can try to unravel and hopefully understand the knot of events that have occured in the last week, and for those who might want to undertake a similiar path to mine in the future.

I live in a so-called corridor with 14 other people, most of whom come from Sweden/speak Swedish. That should give me a priceless opportunity to practice my Swedish, but so far most of them have been quite shy and evasive. It's quite surprising that all the Swedes I've met so far have either replied to me in Swedish, even if they knew I could speak English, or have switched to Swedish once I started to talk to them in Swedish. They would only occasionally switch to English to say a word I didn't understand in Swedish, but fortunately they would also switch right back to Swedish afterwards.

I've tried to speak Swedish as much as I could, but I've noticed something very weird in my behaviour which also surprises me. Basically I randomly select the people whom I'd like to strike up a conversation in Swedish with. Sometimes it's because I think I don't know enough words to actually ask something meaningful, but other times even if I knew exactly how to say something in Swedish. The first few days have been quite hard for me and so I would only speak English. Note to self: try to speak Swedish even in those situations..

I've had a Swedish language test a few days ago to see if my level is good enough in order for me to take classes in Swedish. I had to write 200-300 words about my arrival in Lund and what I think I can expect from my stay. Nothing too hard, and I think I've done well enough, but it came totally out of the blue as we all test takers were expecting a grammar test of some sort.

I've bought two very cheap books in Swedish: "Får hackspettar huvudvärk?" by Paul Heiney and "Mannen som försvann" by F. W. Dixon (apparently I have a thing for disappearing men...). The first one I like very much. It's a collection of science-related questions and their transparent and uncomplicated answers, which means that I don't have to read it like a novel but can just leaf through it and find interesting questions. The second one is a children's book. Perfect for me: short, relatively easy language, and funny stories.

Surprisingly enough, I've also had lots of opportunities to practice my German: one of my flat mates is German and I've made friends with a few German students. Lund seems to be full of Germans so it shouldn't really be too find someone to talk to if I'll really want to.
There was a so-called "free store" made specifically for international/exchange students a few days ago and I managed to grab a German book, "Vegetarisch genießen" by Susanne Teige. I'm not really vegetarian but as the good Italian that I am I love cooking and try to switch to healthier diets from time to time. It will be an interesting read for sure.
I'm trying my best to speak this language (which I have a love-hate relationship with), I really am, but I'm still struggling so much and I lack so many words that I feel really disappointed with myself. I've also noticed that German people tend to switch to English really fast. If I try to tell them that I can speak German they'll just look surprised and ask me in English how come I do. This doesn't really bother me at the moment. My German is just too sloppy to have good, flowing conversations, but it just means that it'll be much harder to practice.
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Elenia
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Re: Sarnek's log - Deutsch/Svenska

Postby Elenia » Fri Aug 28, 2015 1:18 am

Sarnek wrote:Finally one day with nothing to do. It's probably about time I updated my log, both for my own sake, so that I can try to unravel and hopefully understand the knot of events that have occured in the last week, and for those who might want to undertake a similiar path to mine in the future.

I live in a so-called corridor with 14 other people, most of whom come from Sweden/speak Swedish. That should give me a priceless opportunity to practice my Swedish, but so far most of them have been quite shy and evasive. It's quite surprising that all the Swedes I've met so far have either replied to me in Swedish, even if they knew I could speak English, or have switched to Swedish once I started to talk to them in Swedish. They would only occasionally switch to English to say a word I didn't understand in Swedish, but fortunately they would also switch right back to Swedish afterwards.

I've tried to speak Swedish as much as I could, but I've noticed something very weird in my behaviour which also surprises me. Basically I randomly select the people whom I'd like to strike up a conversation in Swedish with. Sometimes it's because I think I don't know enough words to actually ask something meaningful, but other times even if I knew exactly how to say something in Swedish. The first few days have been quite hard for me and so I would only speak English. Note to self: try to speak Swedish even in those situations..

I've had a Swedish language test a few days ago to see if my level is good enough in order for me to take classes in Swedish. I had to write 200-300 words about my arrival in Lund and what I think I can expect from my stay. Nothing too hard, and I think I've done well enough, but it came totally out of the blue as we all test takers were expecting a grammar test of some sort.

I've bought two very cheap books in Swedish: "Får hackspettar huvudvärk?" by Paul Heiney and "Mannen som försvann" by F. W. Dixon (apparently I have a thing for disappearing men...). The first one I like very much. It's a collection of science-related questions and their transparent and uncomplicated answers, which means that I don't have to read it like a novel but can just leaf through it and find interesting questions. The second one is a children's book. Perfect for me: short, relatively easy language, and funny stories.

Surprisingly enough, I've also had lots of opportunities to practice my German: one of my flat mates is German and I've made friends with a few German students. Lund seems to be full of Germans so it shouldn't really be too find someone to talk to if I'll really want to.
There was a so-called "free store" made specifically for international/exchange students a few days ago and I managed to grab a German book, "Vegetarisch genießen" by Susanne Teige. I'm not really vegetarian but as the good Italian that I am I love cooking and try to switch to healthier diets from time to time. It will be an interesting read for sure.
I'm trying my best to speak this language (which I have a love-hate relationship with), I really am, but I'm still struggling so much and I lack so many words that I feel really disappointed with myself. I've also noticed that German people tend to switch to English really fast. If I try to tell them that I can speak German they'll just look surprised and ask me in English how come I do. This doesn't really bother me at the moment. My German is just too sloppy to have good, flowing conversations, but it just means that it'll be much harder to practice.


It's been my impression of Lund that no one would switch to English unless it was clear that I was really floundering. However, like you, I have always panicked at the critical moment and so spoken in English, instead. Was the test you took Tisus? Or Svenska B? Or another one organised for exchange students? Sorry, that's a lot of questions. I am considering studying for a Masters at Lund in the future - if they'll have me! - but I would need to be able to prove proficiency for my preferred course, and I don't think I'm there yet.

It has also always been my experience that the Germans I have met are genuinely surprised that I want to learn German. I've even had a few German friends try to persuade me otherwise. It's really lucky that you will also have contact with Germans during your stay, hopefully you will be able to convince them that you can speak their language, and that you want to, also. Lycka till!
0 x

Sarnek
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Posts: 59
Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2015 8:55 am
Location: Rossano, Italy
Languages: Italian (N), English (Fluent), Swedish (Advanced-), German (Intermediate-)
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Re: Sarnek's log - Deutsch/Svenska

Postby Sarnek » Fri Aug 28, 2015 8:25 am

Elenia wrote:
It's been my impression of Lund that no one would switch to English unless it was clear that I was really floundering. However, like you, I have always panicked at the critical moment and so spoken in English, instead. Was the test you took Tisus? Or Svenska B? Or another one organised for exchange students? Sorry, that's a lot of questions. I am considering studying for a Masters at Lund in the future - if they'll have me! - but I would need to be able to prove proficiency for my preferred course, and I don't think I'm there yet.

It has also always been my experience that the Germans I have met are genuinely surprised that I want to learn German. I've even had a few German friends try to persuade me otherwise. It's really lucky that you will also have contact with Germans during your stay, hopefully you will be able to convince them that you can speak their language, and that you want to, also. Lycka till!


That is one thing I really like about the people here. Apart from the fact that they are all exceedingly helpful and kind, they'll just patiently listen to you speak Swedish even if you stumble several times and they will keep the conversation in Swedish. I am very surprised by this because it goes against everything I had previuously heard about Swedes.

Anyway, the test I took was made purposefully made for exchange students. I got the results btw and got accepted into lvl 5! That means that I'll be able to follow the highest level and follow courses in Swedish as well. Quite a relief. I don't know what I could have done otherwise. Not that now it'll be a stroll in the park, obviously. The Swedish system is kind of similiar to the one of the anglophone countries and very different from the italian one. I'll have to get used to writing lots of scientific essays, both in Swedish and English.
To study at a Master level in Sweden you need to take a Tisus (as long as you wish to study courses in Swedish), which is a C1+. I, too, was considering continuing my studies here in Lund, or elsewhere in Sweden, and I'll probably take the test next May/June if I'll still wish to do so.
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daegga
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Re: Sarnek's log - Deutsch/Svenska

Postby daegga » Fri Aug 28, 2015 9:25 pm

I'm also eyeing with Sweden, but getting a flat seems to be the hardest part of it when you are no exchange student, at least in the relevant cities.
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Elenia
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Re: Sarnek's log - Deutsch/Svenska

Postby Elenia » Fri Aug 28, 2015 11:14 pm

Well done on your test results! Although you've put in so much work, I'm not surprised - you've deserved it! Getting used to a different style of academic writing will be a challenge, but it is definitely possible to overcome, and I think you will get used to it quite quickly. I look forward to reading more about your year!

Yep, Tisus sounds terrifying to me right now! I would put my skills at around a low B1 level. So the only real option for me to study would do a specification on my chosen course, either French or English, as they don't have a Swedish language requirement, but that would be a compromise.
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Emme
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Languages: Native: Italian
University level (C1-C2): English, German
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Dabbled (A0): Japanese, Romanian, Latin, Chinese
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Re: Sarnek's log - Deutsch/Svenska

Postby Emme » Mon Aug 31, 2015 8:20 pm

Sarnek wrote:[...] I've recently moved to Sweden as I've won an Erasmus scholarship and I'll be spending about a year in Lund, in the South of Sweden, studying at Lund's University. [...]


So you’re already in Lund! That's great!

I wish you that your stay in Sweden will turn out to be as fantastic as it promises to be and that Erasmus will offer you an unforgettable experience for all the right reasons!

Lycka till!
1 x
Corrections are ALWAYS welcome for any language.

Sarnek
Yellow Belt
Posts: 59
Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2015 8:55 am
Location: Rossano, Italy
Languages: Italian (N), English (Fluent), Swedish (Advanced-), German (Intermediate-)
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Re: Sarnek's log - Deutsch/Svenska

Postby Sarnek » Tue Sep 01, 2015 7:14 am

Emme wrote:
Sarnek wrote:[...] I've recently moved to Sweden as I've won an Erasmus scholarship and I'll be spending about a year in Lund, in the South of Sweden, studying at Lund's University. [...]


So you’re already in Lund! That's great!

I wish you that your stay in Sweden will turn out to be as fantastic as it promises to be and that Erasmus will offer you an unforgettable experience for all the right reasons!

Lycka till!


Ciao Emme!
It's so nice to have you back here. I really hope things are going better with you now... We all missed you.

Thank you so much!
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Re: Sarnek's log - Deutsch/Svenska

Postby Expugnator » Tue Sep 01, 2015 10:02 am

Nice to see you back and with great news, Sarnek! The fact you got so much practice in Swedish and no switching just renewed my hopes in humankind :lol: looking forward to hearing more about your experience as a foreign student at the highest level.
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Emme
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Dabbled (A0): Japanese, Romanian, Latin, Chinese
Currently actively studying: None
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1238
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Re: Sarnek's log - Deutsch/Svenska

Postby Emme » Wed Sep 02, 2015 5:21 pm

Sarnek wrote:Ciao Emme!
It's so nice to have you back here. I really hope things are going better with you now... We all missed you.

Thank you so much!


Thanks for the kind words!
RL is still rather chaotic but I’m hanging in there.
And yes, it’s good to be back among friends!
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Corrections are ALWAYS welcome for any language.


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