Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

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Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Iversen » Wed Aug 19, 2015 3:00 pm

EN: The tour de my paintings continues with another Germanic language, namely English, which I have illustrated through "The Waste Land" by T.S. Eliott, who was born in St.Louis, Missouri, but ended up as a naturalized arch-English Anglican-Catholic London-dwelling academic poet with a Nobel Prize on his notice board - and a polyglot too. In the Waste Land he starts out with this dedication to Ezra Pound:

"Nam Sibyllam quidem Cumis ego ipse oculis meis
vidi in ampulla pendere, et cum illi pueri dicerent:
"Σίβυλλα τί θέλεις;" respondebat illa: "Ἁποθανεῖν θέλω"


Those readers who are scared away by this threeheaded Kerberos at the front gate are probably not members of the targeted segment, and the poem carries on with quotes in half a dozen languages. And although I do know a few Greek words I had to look up "αποθανεῖν" (to die). The construction is not possible in Modern Greek, where the infinitive long ago has been awarded the privilege denied to Sibylle, namely to leave this vale of sorrow. She is of course the one depicted as hanging in the bottle.

In the middle you see Madame Sosostris, "famous clairvoyante (...) known to be the wisest woman in Europe, With a wicked pack of cards. Here, said she, Is your card, the drowned Phoenician Sailor, (..)" .. whom you see just above the Greek Merchant, Mr. Eugenides from Smyrna. "I do not find The Hanged Man." sayeth the seeress - but that's her own fault. He is hanging just behind her back, in the company of "Tiresias, though blind, throbbing between two lives, Old man with wrinkled female breasts". Ahem, whence came the tits attributed to this seer from the Iliad? Well, you can read the story here, but basically the French poet Apollinaire wrote a play based on a legend that claimed that a lady named Teresa had undergone a gender transformation and become a blind male fortune teller in the service of a certain Homer. Or maybe it was Ovid's unfounded claim that Tiresias became female for seven years by looking at copulating snakes. A propos, did you know that the name Ομήρος means "hostage" in Greek? And why is Homer supposed to have been blind? Could this be a reaction to his description of the sky as the same colour as bronze? Nevermind, I'm digressing. The little man in the upper left corner is of course Mr Eliot, e

Kunst050.jpg
The Waste Land
Kunst050.jpg (42.89 KiB) Viewed 1954 times

Poi s'ascose nel foco che gli affina
Quando fiam ceu chelidon— O swallow swallow
Le Prince d'Aquitaine a la tour abolie
These fragments I have shored against my ruins
Why then Ile fit you. Hieronymo's mad againe.
Datta. Dayadhvam. Damyata.
Shantih shantih shantih
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Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Jar-Ptitsa » Wed Aug 19, 2015 4:38 pm

Iversen wrote:

Si je ne me trompe pas, il y effectivement un train TGV de Lille a Londres, et Lille est aussi sur la route entre Paris et Bruxelles et/ou Amsterdam. Mais il y a aussi des trains TER vers Anvers et Tournai (en principe vers Namur, mais pour des raisons techniques il faut pour le moment changer à Tournai). À Lille il y a deux gares principales: la vielle Lille Flandres est ce que les Allemands appellent un "Endbahnhof", c.a.d. une gare cul-de-sac (ou tête-de-ligne). Les TGV directs passent par Lille Europe, qui se trouve un peu plus à l'est et qui est un "Zwischenbahnhof" où les trains peuvent continuer dans la même direction.


Zuerst ging ich auf Niederländisch antwroten, aber Zenmonkey spricht es nicht (oder?) vielleicht doch, mit alle seine Kinder über ganz Europa :lol:

Den Bahnhof in Lille kenne ich nicht, aber von Lüttich wohl, und er ist wirklich wunderschön. Vorher, war es hässlich, eine richtige Müllkippe :lol: :x dann hat der Architekt Calatrava den neuen gebaut. Ich finde es sehr schön.

Liège-Guillemins vorher

Image

und jetzt

ImageImage
Last edited by Jar-Ptitsa on Thu Aug 20, 2015 5:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Jar-Ptitsa » Wed Aug 19, 2015 8:45 pm

Iversen wrote: The little man in the upper left corner is of course Mr Eliot,


Haha, it's great that you put him in his own picture and that he can look at all the things. :) For sure he likes your painting.

waar zijn alle jouw beelden nu?

Ik weet noch toen je de schilderij had geplaatst waar jij zelf daarachter sta - toen je jong was. ik vroeg wie dat was, en je zei dat jijzelf dat was.
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Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Iversen » Thu Aug 20, 2015 6:26 pm

EN: Liège Guillemins has certainly got a beautiful railway station now. Time will tell when I get there in person to admire it.

I mentioned Apollinaire. He is interesting not only for having written "Le Mamelles the Tiresias", but also for having invented the word "surrealism".

And now for today's painting which will illustrate Danish, although in a fairly old version. It's title is "Karrig nidding" (i.e. 'Miserly knave'). It is a school comedy written in 1633 by a vicar from Viborg named Hieronymus Justesen Ranch. I have not found the complete text on the internet, but at Runeberg.org the whole play is summarized in Danish, and there is a quote which illustrates the style quite well for those of you who can read Danish:

DA: En Slug, en Fraadser er altid mager,
Det er hendes egen Mave, hende plager.
At hun ser ud saa gusten og bleg
Er tør og gastig som Bark paa Eg,
Volde hine mange kræsne Retter,
Med hvilke hun sig daglig mætter,
Fraadser og fylder op og ned.
Det er Aarsag, som hver vel veed,
Thi en Fraadser bliver aldrig fed.
Der har du, Nabo! min Besked


EN: A hog, a glutton is always skinny
It's her own stomach that torments her.
That she looks so sallow and pale,
is dry and (.?.) as the bark on an oak
is caused by the many delicate dishes
with which she daily sates herself,
devours and gorges up and down
That's (the) reason, as everybody knows,
as a glutton will never get fat.
That's my message, neighbour.

The situation is that the 'hero' is a man who is so miserly that he locks everything away, including all food in his house, and when his neighbour accuses him of starving his poor wife Jutta to death he angrily answers that she is a horrible glutton who ruins him by her extravagant lifestyle, as quoted above.

Then one day he leaves home to go out begging for money in the streets, and while he is away a man named "Jep Skjald" ('Jep the bard') knocks at the door. When he gets the story from the wife he persudes her to open all the chests and cupboards in the house right away and have a colonormous party - well, she is actually not that hard to convince, not even to share her bed with the foreigner (remember: this is written by a clergy man in Viborg and supposed to be played by his pupils in the local school). When the husband afterwards comes home they all - including the neighbours and servants - deny ever having seen him, but let him have a meal and a night's sleep before he is chased away. And Jep Skjald and Jutta lived happily ever after to the end of their days, while mr. Nidding from then on had to walk around as a real homeless beggar.

Kunst051.jpg
Karrig Nidding
Kunst051.jpg (48.87 KiB) Viewed 1906 times

DA: Stykket er blevet vist som film på TV med Olaf Ussing i hovedrollen - men det er mange år siden nu. Ussing var en lille mand i rundbuestil, og afbildningen af ham på billedet er faktisk ganske realistisk. De andre figurer på billedet illustrerer bare et vildt liv med alskens udskejelser. Den hængte mand hører ikke til i handlingen - jeg fik ham vist til overs fra et andet maleri. Og jeg kan ikke længere huske hvorfor der er nogle felter til højre som er inspireret af amerikanske indianere. Det er trods alt godt fyrre år siden at jeg malede billedet.

EN: Addendum: the more I look at the picture the more I think that the hanged man started out as either a bottle in a string or as a ham left to airdry. I still don't know what the American Indians are doing in a Danish school comedy from 1633. Maybe somebody just mentioned them around me while I painted the painting, and then they usurped the bottom right section.
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Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Jar-Ptitsa » Fri Aug 21, 2015 10:11 pm

Iversen, I like your new avatar, it is truly great: you are smiling and behind you are the dinosaurs' skeletons. :) But of course I liked your htlal one as well, where you are with the two leopards.

Today, it was extremely annoying becuase a Polish lady thinks that she exaclty knows what I think. She is completely wrong, but she tells me off, although she didn't understand AT ALL what I think or had said. She is absolutley arrogant, and I wish that she would stop telling me what I had not thought or said or written, or in effect would ever think.

The weather was sunny today, finally, the summer 8-)

I hope that you will have a nice weekend :)
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Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Iversen » Fri Aug 21, 2015 10:52 pm

F3204a04.jpg
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EN: Those two 'leopards' were actually cheetas, and they were handfed and lived at a place outside Nairobi in Kenya. btw did you know that the 'liupards' in heraldry traditionally were depicted almost like the socalled lions, but with the head turned out towards you - and in this role they were also called "lion passant guardant". Well, what could you expect from people who never had seen any of the two species in real life?

And while we're speaking old things, let's have a look at some Old Norse mythology.

IC: Mynd dagsins lýsir ekkert minna en sögu heimsins, byggt á ljóðinu "Völuspá" (Vǫluspá) frá Eddukvæða, sem talið er að hafi verið skrifuð um 1270, en endurspeglar talsvert eldri hefðir heiðnum tíma. . Völvan er spákona sem er galdraðar upp úr jörðinni til að tala um allt - einfaldlega! Hún byrjar skýrslu með stofnun jarðarinnar í rúm milli ísríkin Hiflheim og eldurríkin Muspelheim ...

EN: OK, I may already have lost a few readers here, but today's painting is based on the most important poem in Old Norse, named Völuspá (the Prophecy of the Seeress) which you can read on all the Nordic languages at Heimskringla.no and in several English translations, including one by H.A. Bellows which also contains commentaries. And commentaries are relevant because part of the Old Norse poetic practice is to refer to things and events through veiled references to other Old Norse poems - some of which have disappeared in the meantime.

One thing which may be of interest to modern readers is that it contains a list of dwarwes, and on this list there are some wellknown names:

[/I]Þar var Móðsognir / mæztr of orðinn / dverga allra, / en Durinn annarr;
(...)
Nýi, Niði, Norðri, Suðri, Austri, Vestri, Alþjófr, Dvalinn, (...) Bívurr, Bávurr,
Bömburr, Nóri, (...) inn, Mjöðvitnir (...) Veggr ok Gandalfr,
Vindalfr, Þorinn, Þrár ok Þráinn, [/I]

"-alfr" of course means 'elf', but the name 'Gandalf' occur on a list of dwarwes, not elves (and even less sorcerers). Did mr. Tolkien REALLY believe we wouldn't discover this???

But now we have already anticipated the events. First the Earth must be created, and it took shape as a giant Ymir in the empty space Ginnungagap between the icecold Hiflheim to the North and the burning hot Muspelheim to the South. But this poem just summarily says that "gap var ginnunga / en gras hvergi. / (..) Áðr Burs synir / bjöðum of yppðu, / þeir er Miðgarð / mæran skópu;" - and we have to know from elsewhere (i.e. Vafthruthnismál) that Bur's sons killed Ymir and created the world as we know it (called Miðgarð) from his body. You can see all this to the left in the painting :

Kunst059.jpg
Völuspá
Kunst059.jpg (41.33 KiB) Viewed 1865 times

In the middle I have painted a couple to the devious Loki, including the scene where he has been tied naked in a cave under a venom-spitting snake as a punishment for a series of crimes, including getting the god Baldur killed and then spoiling the attempt to get him back from Helheim. But he takes revenge during Ragnarok, where he comes sailing on a ship built of dead men's nails:

Kjóll ferr austan,
koma munu Múspells
of lög lýðir,
en Loki stýrir;


O'er the sea from the north | there sails a ship
With the people of Hel, | at the helm stands Loki

As you can see the translation doesn't quite follow the original ... but it is seriously hard to translate poetry, and I don't blame Bellows too hard for claiming that the passagers aboard the ship are from the realm of the dead. The Muspells' are of course from Muspelheim - the hot place to the South. But nevertheless, the Gods fight the monsters and evil creatures in an epic battle worthy to be compared to those in Tolkien's books. The most wellknown gods all die (like Odinn, who kills and is killed by the Fenris wolf, while Thor kills and is killed by the Midgaard "orm" (a giant sea snake). But their sons and a couple of survivors (including Baldr who returns from Hell) win the battle and kill the monsters... well, there are are few things that need a bit of repair work, so things are not quite back to the good ol' days yet:

Sól tér sortna,
sígr fold í mar,
hverfa af himni
heiðar stjörnur;
geisar eimi
ok aldrnari,
leikr hár hiti
við himin sjalfan.

The sun turns black, | earth sinks in the sea,
The hot stars down | from heaven are whirled;
Fierce grows the steam | and the life-feeding flame,
Till fire leaps high | about heaven itself.


... but at the end things calm down, a new Earth conveniently rises from below, and the new generation of Gods can sit down to have a game of 'tavl':

In wondrous beauty | once again
Shall the golden tables | stand mid the grass,
Which the gods had owned | in the days of old


The next but last stanza is controversial because it doesn't appear in the oldest manuscripts and because it looks like a Christian addition addition to the old heathen poem which could justify that learned clergymen dealt with it at all:

Þá kemr inn ríki
at regindómi
öflugr ofan,
sá er öllu ræðr.

There comes on high, | all power to hold,
A mighty lord, | all lands he rules.


But the old world gets the last word in the shape of the black dragon Niðhöggr, which carries the dead bodies away on its back:

Þar kemr inn dimmi
dreki fljúgandi,
naðr fránn, neðan
frá Niðafjöllum;
berr sér í fjöðrum,
- flýgr völl yfir, -
Niðhöggr nái.
Nú mun hon sökkvask.

From below the dragon | dark comes forth,
Nithhogg flying | from Nithafjoll;
The bodies of men on | his wings he bears,
The serpent bright: | but now must I sink.
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Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Iversen » Sun Aug 23, 2015 5:00 pm

FR: Pendant mon dernier séjour en France j'ai acheté deux numéros de "Science et Vie", qui est ma révue préférée de science populaire en français. Chaque numéro a un thème, mais il y a aussi des articles qui ne touchent pas ce thème. Dans les deux exemplaires que je vois devant moi les thèmes sont "La Terre cette inconnee" (hors série juin 2015) et "Vous avez dit bizarre? Le paranormal décrypté par la science" (août 2015).

Le problème avec le paranormal, c'est que beaucoup de ceux qui y croient ne croyent pas à la science. Et parfois il faut avouer que les soi-disant "explications" qu'on a proposé sont assez peu convaincantes. On problème commun pour tous ces phénomènes est qu'on ne devrait pas se fier uniquement sur les témoignages humains , même pas dans les salles d'audience, mais d'autre-part il est impossible d'ignorer des milliers témoignages de personnes normalment crédible à moins qu'on peux expliquer d'une façon rationelle ce qu'elles ont vu.

Par exemple: "vous avez dit hantise" (p.50)? Il est en effet possible the repliquer les sensations de hantise par des moyens artificiels, `savoir une stimulation des lobes pariétaux et temporaux avec des faibles courant électriques. Dans une autre experience on a touché légèrement le dos des volontaires avec un bras robot qui mimait leurs mouvements. Si il le faisait avec avec un petit décalage ils sentaient qui "quelqu'un" ou "quelque chose" était là avec eux. Ajouter les sensations provoquées par des infrasons (inaudibles), fluctuations dans un champ magnétique ou de température, ou mêmes des influences de nature chimique. Ici je pense aux émissions de télévision sur les chasseurs de spectres, qui souvent mesurent des baisses de température ou autres changements physiques au moment où ils ont senti ou écouté quelque-chose d'inexplicable.

Sur la page 58 on discute la paralysie du sommeil. Il est tout à fait normal que les muscles du corps sont paralysés pendant le sommeil REM, mais parfois cette condition peux durer un peu après le reveil, et dans cet étât rêve et sensations réelles peuvent se mêler - ce qui ressemble les descriptions donnés par les soi-disant 'abductés' (sauf que leur rapports ont quelques thèmes et 'protagonistes' communs, tels les petits types gris avec les gros yeux noirs). Pour les sceptiques des "abductions" l'existence de sensations artificiellement provoquées ou naturelles suffisent à expliquer tous les témoignages de cette sorte. Mais pour ceux qui croient vraiment que des extraterrestes sont venu ici pour nous examiner ou pour tout autre cause il est du moins aussi logique d'interpréter leurs mémoires comme des mémoires d'évènements réels. Et d'ailleurs on peut gagner plus d'argent avec les films qui excitent notre goût des choses surnaturelles qu'avec des films ou livres ou site d'internet qui disent que nous sommes tous des idiots crédules qui ne savent distinguer la fiction et la vérité.

Le problème, c'est que cette loqique fonctionne aussi dans le sens opposé: on ne peut pas exclure définitivement qu'il y'a des phantômes ou que le monde est plein de bigfoots.
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Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Jar-Ptitsa » Sun Aug 23, 2015 8:06 pm

Iversen wrote:
F3204a04.jpg

Those two 'leopards' were actually cheetas, and they were handfed and lived at a place outside Nairobi in Kenya. btw did you know that the 'liupards' in heraldry traditionally were depicted almost like the socalled lions, but with the head turned out towards you - and in this role they were also called "lion passant guardant". Well, what could you expect from people who never had seen any of the two species in real life?



Oh whoops!!! Sorry cheetas!!! they are both spotty, therefore seem similar.

No, I didn't know this about the leopards and lions. they look completely different, althgouh of course not different like the elephants or giraffes.

I've searched and found this one which is a scottish one. in the first version the leopards seems furious and unfriendly :shock:

Image

Then probably the town wanted a nicer one or all the people would be frightened to visit Aberdeen!!! and they made this:

Image
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Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Iversen » Sun Aug 23, 2015 8:52 pm

So now Aberdeen is guarded by laughing and dancing jaguars?
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Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Jar-Ptitsa » Mon Aug 24, 2015 4:20 pm

Iversen wrote:So now Aberdeen is guarded by laughing and dancing jaguars?



Hahahahahahaahhahahaahahaha :lol: :lol: :lol:

Now they are jaguars !!! sorry, jaguars, I thought that you were leopards!!

For sure all the spotty cats look similar :?, although the cheetas look bit different, they have little faces.

The jaguars' nails look sharp and scratchy, but their faces look so cute and they are dancing so happily. for sure, the visitors to Aberdeen will feel more welcome than when the ferocious and angry leopards were there!!!!

Your home town Århus hasn't animals on its heradlry, but two people chatting:

Image
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