Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Continue or start your personal language log here, including logs for challenge participants
User avatar
Iversen
Black Belt - 2nd Dan
Posts: 2614
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:36 pm
Location: Denmark
Languages: Monolingual travels in Danish, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Romanian and (part time) Esperanto
Ahem, not yet: Norwegian, Afrikaans, Platt, Scots, Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Albanian, Greek, Latin, Irish, Indonesian and a few more...
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1027
x 5680

Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Iversen » Sun Jan 12, 2020 8:37 am

Iversen wrote:When I'm through I'll need a good long holiday...

Just before I shut my PC down for the night a few hours ago I made some rough calculations over how many messages it will take to get me through the Romantic composers and the 20. century without feeling that I have left out something essential. And at the latest estimate that will mean at least 17 or 18 messages, not just 12 - and then the good long holiday will have to be inserted somewhere long before I have reached the end of the tale. But it is fun to write about something concrete in a systematic way instead of just rattling off book or article titles or the names of TV programs. And I can get through most of my languages this way. Right now I'm even thinking about having a peek at the history of gamelan music in order to be able to add a chapter in Indonesian - I can probably get the extra vocabulary from the internet. But I'll still have to cheat in order to tell about Hungarian or Finnish music since I haven't studied the relevant languages (yet). And I can't write about Indian or Chinese or Japanese music at all since they are outside my area of linguistic competence. And since I write in all the languages I can muster this forum is the only place in the world where I can dump this concise history of Western music.

So below I'll try sketch my plans as of today - but the order and the content of each installment may be changed when I reach it.

1) the Mozarts, Beethoven, Schubert - and from there to the viennese walzer kings and a few kindred souls from other towns

2) the Mendelssohns (Felix and Fanny), the Schumanns (Robert and Clara), Brahms and his antipode Wagner, and from there to the mega symphonists Bruckner, Mahler, Richard Strauss, ending with Hindemith and maybe Karl Amadeus Hartmann

3) Dutch and Flemish music - little known outside their countries, but people like the Pergolesi impostor Wassenaar,Hellendaal .. and then a wide jump in time to recent composers like Andriessen, Peeters, Diepenbrock, Badings

4) Danish composers Yeahh! We did have them! Weyse, Kuhlau, the Danish dynasty Hartmann, NW Gade, Horneman, Lange-Müller, late romantics like Enna and Klenau, Carl Nielsen versus Rued Langgaard, Holmboe and the dynasty Koppel

5) Swedish music from the baroque composer Roman over the 'Sweedish Beethoven' Berwald to Alfvén, Stenhammar, Atterberg, Rangström, Larsson Munktell and Pettersson

6) Norwegian music, starting with Ole Bull (more for his service as violin virtuoso than for his compositions), Grieg, Halvorsen, Sæverud,Valen - and maybe also a few Icelandic composers (Jon Leifs comes to mind)

7) Finnish and Baltic music: definitely Sibelius, Klami, Melartin - but then over to the three Baltic countries with composers like Tubin and Ciurlionis

8) Russian music part A: Glinka, the mighty five, Tschaikovsky, Glazunov, lazy Ljadov, Glière, Scriabin .. and after them fugitives from the revolution like Rachmaninov and Stravinsky

9) Russian music part B: from the revolution with Mosolov and the machines through Prokofiev, Shostakovitch and the dubious apparatchik Khrennikov, further on from there via the exotic ones like Khatchaturian, Ippolitov, Aroutunian and Hovhaness (although he lived in the USA) to young ladies like Kuzina and Kuznetsova

10) Eastern/Central Europe part A: from Poland, starting with Bakfark through Chopin and ending with romanticists like Moniuszko and Wieniawski, to Czechia with Smetana, Dvorak, Fibich

11) Eastern/Central Europe part B: from Hungary with Liszt, Kéler Bela, Kodaly, Janacek, Bartok to the Balkan states: Enescu, Dinicu .. maybe even the great panflute player Zamfir, some Greek composers Hadjidakis, Theodorakis ... and at the end of the trail obscure Turkish composers like Tüzün and Erkin (in some default language - maybe Esperanto, maybe English)

12) British music: the days of the empire with Ketèlbey, Elgar, Holst, dame Smyth, some lost composers from around world war 1, Vaughan-Williams, Walton, Britten - and an Australian: Percy Grainger

13) French music from Cherubini, Berlioz, Saint-Saëns and Gounod over organ composers like Franck (ahem, Belgian), Widor, Boellmann to Debussy, Ravel, Ibert and 'les six'

14) Italian music, i.e. the ouvertures and ballet music by Bellini, Rossini, Verdi, to some extent Puccini and the mainly instrumental genius Respighi - but from here in an unexpected direction to virtuosos like Paganini (and his stalker Ernst), Thalberg and the young Liszt

15) Spanish music from Sor, Tarrega, Albeniz, Granados, Turina and de Falla to Paco de Lucía ... and whatever I can find from Portugal

16) Latin American music: Gomez, Carreño, Guárneri, Villa-Lobos, Chavez, Moncayo, Marquéz, Revueltas, Lecuona and some Argentinian tango composers ... and yes, also the Condor Pasa and other items from the Andes region

17) USA: the great galloping Gottschalk, Latin influences with Copland, symphonists Hanson, Harris, Barber, Bloch, the jazz influence with Gershwin, L.Bernstein, "Hollywood music" from Steiner, Korngold, Newman, Herrmann to newer names like Barry, J.T.Williams and Bacalov

18) (maybe something about Asiatic musical traditions)

Kunst173.JPG
Kunst173.JPG (13.51 KiB) Viewed 354 times
2 x

User avatar
Iversen
Black Belt - 2nd Dan
Posts: 2614
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:36 pm
Location: Denmark
Languages: Monolingual travels in Danish, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Romanian and (part time) Esperanto
Ahem, not yet: Norwegian, Afrikaans, Platt, Scots, Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Albanian, Greek, Latin, Irish, Indonesian and a few more...
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1027
x 5680

Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Iversen » Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:07 pm

EN: OK, Mozart ... the only composer who is so famous that a cake has been name after him. There are several receipts named after the Italian composer Rossini (like Tournedos Rossini and Rossini Caviar), but that's possibly because Rossini himself was a great gourmand - and that definitely put its marks on his growing waistline! OIn contrast Mozart remained slim until the end of his short life. And this was not due to poverty, as some might believe - he actually earned quite well (although he also was something of a player type, so he may have squandered some of his earnings away and made bad investments). His funeral may have been jämmerlich to say the least, but the emperor Joseph had actually banned lavish funerals at the time, so it was not unusual for people to be buried in such as spartan style that at the time. However this austere practice died with that particular emperor.

GER: Mozart hat es geschafft, 40 Symphonien (nummeriert als no. 1 bis 41) und viele Opern zu schreiben, obwohl er erst 35 Jahre alt war (und einige Monate). Konnte er nicht zählen? Sicher, aber Nr. 37 wurde tatsächlich von Michael Haydn, Josephs kleinem Bruder, geschrieben, und Mozart hat nur eine Einführung hinzu hingefügt. So ist es wenn man Eile hast. Und Mozart mußte schnell arbeiten, um Geld zu verdienen. In seiner Jugend war er beim Salzburger Fürstbischof angestellt, zog aber dann nach Wien ohne Erlaubnis - und wurde dafür entlassen. Pater Leopold, selbst ein solider und angesehener Komponist, war wütend und auch mit Wolfgangs Wahl des Ehepartners unzufrieden, aber es war egal - Wolfgang Amadeus tat nur, was er selber tun wollte.

Mozart war ein Freund von Joseph Haydn und lernte viel von ihm, aber wenn man sich ihre Kompositionen ansieht, war Haydn tatsächlich der innovativere - nicht zuletzt in Bezug auf die Gaumenfreuden, die den weniger wichtigen Instrumenten zugewiesen wurden. Aber Mozart war wahrscheinlich besser darin, Ohrwürmer zu erfinden. Die Opern haben (neben den hervorragenden Ouvertüren) etwas Auffälliges im Gemein: sie haben im Allgemeinen italienische Namen. Und es zeigt, wo Mozart im Kampf zwischen italienischem und französischem Opernstil sich posizioniert hat. Das Klarinettenkonzert hat auch etwas Merkwürdiges an sich: es ist nicht für die Klarinette geschrieben, sondern für ein Instrument namens Bassetthorn. Es gibt aber heute nur wenige, die einen solchen Kreatur besitzen. Deshalb wird es auf einer normalen Klarinette gespielt - und die tiefsten Noten müssen eine Oktave höher transponiert werden.

Mozart_Kuchen.jpg
Mozart_Kuchen.jpg (24.17 KiB) Viewed 336 times

Ludwig van Beethoven wurde in Bonn als sohn von Johann van Beethoven, ein Deutsch-Flämische Singer am Hofe vom Erzbischof von Köln. Als Vatti bemerkte, daß das Söhnlein ziemlich musikalisch war, hat er gedacht, er könne "einen Mozart machen" und von Konzertreisen mit dem jungen Genie grosses Geld verdienen. Doch Ludwig ist abgehauen und landete letzendlich in Wien. Hier wurde er sehr populär unter die Aristokraten, die glaubten daß er auch adelig sei wegen das klein "van". Aber so hießen viele Niederländer einfach, ohne dafür adelig zu sein. Und als die Wahrheit für die Perückbedeckten Narren dämmerte, war Beethoven bereits berühmt - er war nämlich auch ein ausgezeichneter Klavierspieler und Komponist. Die Virtuosenkarriere mußte jedoch unterbrochen werden, als er sein Gehör verlor.

Etwa vom Alter 30 wure Beethoven von einer Reihe mysteriöser Krankheiten betroffen: Durchfall, Leibschmerzen, Koliken, Fieberzustände und Entzündungen - und später kam noch dazu Gelbsucht und Leberzirrhose. Allmählich verlor er auch das Gehör, was für einen Musiker offensichtlich katastrophal ist. Wikipedia hat aber dazu diese interessante Information:

Beethovens Biografen haben festgehalten, dass der Künstler regelmäßig billigen Weißwein trank, der von den Winzern damals mit Bleizucker statt mit teurem Rohrzucker gesüßt wurde. Die Knochen und auch das Haar von Beethoven enthalten Blei und zwar in einer Konzentration, die selten gemessen wurde: „Wir haben mehr als 20.000 Patienten untersucht und bei allen den Bleigehalt im Blut und in den Haaren gemessen. Darunter waren nur acht Menschen die vergleichbaren Bleiwerte hatten. Alle acht sind schwer krank und ihre Symptome ähneln denen von Beethoven.

Ein weiteres Problem für Beethoven war, daß er mit hinterhältigem juristische Mitteln das Vormundschaft seines Neffen Karl gewann (auf Kosten der Mutter des Knaben), aber der Karl hat sich zu einen ziemlich zweifelhaften Lümmel entwickelt. Unter diesen Umständen hat sich Beethoven verständlicherweise zu einem alten Griegram entwickelt, der jedoch immernoch hervorragende Musik schrieb - und er hat dabei den Rahmen des alten Wiener Klassikers aus den Tagen von Haydn und Mozart gesprengt. Und er wurde irgendwie zum Archetyp des unabhängigen Komponisten in der kommenden Romantik.

In der Bonner Innenstadt befindet sich ein Museum, das Beethoven-Haus. Aber es gibt drinne sehr wenig zu schauen (sorry, Stadt Bonn).

Peanut Schroeder and his idol.jpg
Peanut Schroeder and his idol.jpg (23.04 KiB) Viewed 336 times

Der geborene Wiener Franz Schubert wuchs im Schatten des Riesen Beethoven auf, aber er war ein ruhiger und friedlicher Typ, der in seinem kurzen Leben außerhalb seines Freundeskreises kaum bekannt war. Er schrieb aber eine unglaubliche Menge an Musik, darunter mindestens 10 Symphonien, vielleicht mehr, von denen jedoch einige etwas am Ende fehlten. Es fehlt dabei aber auch etwas Systematik. Die Nummern der ersten sechs liegen ziemlich fest - diejenige die während sein Leben gespielt wurden. Die späte einstündige Sinfonie in C-Dur wurde im Laufe der Zeit als Nummer 7, 8, 9 oder 10 bezeichnet - heute wird sie aber von den meisten als Nummer 9 bezeichnet. Die sehr berühmte unvollendete wurde auch im Laufe der Zeit als Nummer 7 oder 8 genannt - oder kein Nummer überhaupt geben, weil unvollständig. Aber jetzt wird sie normalerweise als Nummer 8 bezeichnet. Und die Skizzen für eine Sinfonie in E-Dur wurden inzwischen von anderen orchestriert und werden heute normalerweise als Nummer 7 bezeichnet - aber nur noch selten gespielt, außer bei vollständigen Aufnahmen aller Sinfonien. Hinzu kommt ein chaotischer Notenstapel, aus dem eine 10. Symphonie rekonstruiert wurde.

Schubert schrieb auch 17 Opern, von denen nur die Musik für Rosamunde bekannt geworden ist - meistens weil er davon in seinem Streichquartett Nummer 13 ein Thema verwendet hat. Aber noch unheimlicher ist die Anzahl der Lieder. Glücklicherweise wurden einige von anderen Komponisten (einschließlich Liszt) gerettet, die sie für Klavier umschrieben oder darüber Fantasien uzw. schrieb, aber auf den Rest hätte ich persönlich gut verzichten können.

Ländler!

Schubert schrieb davon wenigstens 20, und von dieser Tanz hat sich die Walzer entwickelt Wegen der Neujahrskonzerten des österreichischen Fernsehens kennen die meisten Menschen in Europa vermutlich Johann Strauss den Jüngeren, aber das Genre wurde vor ihm entwickelt - unter anderem von einem gewissen Joseph Lanner. Johann Strauss der Ältere war ein ausgesprochen unsympathischer Typ, der nicht wollte, daß seine drei Söhne Musiker wurden und damit mit Vati konkurrierten. Er bleibt aber immer noch in Erinnerung wegen des Radetzky-Marsches, der zu Ehren eines brutalen österreichischen Generals geschrieben wurde.

Alle drei Söhne wurden jedoch Komponisten. Bruder Eduard war der am wenigsten begabte von ihnen - seine Walzen werden selten gespielt, seine Spezialität waren die Galoppen. Bruder Joseph lebte nur kurz und war etwas melankolisch, aber konnte Walzer schreiben. Er wollte eigentlich Ingenieur werden, aber wenn bruder Johann in 1852 wegen Übermüdung eine Pause einlegen mußte, hat er den Josef gebeten, ihn zu vertreten - und dann ertappte dem Josef das Schicksal: er wurde auch Musiker. Der eigentliche Walzerkönig blieb aber Johann Strauß der Jüngere, und der hat hunderte von Walzer und andere Tänze geschrieben, wovon viele noch im Repertoir der Orchester geblieben sind.

F4638b03&5- Die alte und die neue Donau.jpg
F4638b03&5- Die alte und die neue Donau.jpg (18.22 KiB) Viewed 336 times

Gab es andere Tanzproduzenten? Doch, doch. Es gab in Wien eine Familie Komzak (aus Böhmischen Ursprungs) - mit wenigsten drei generationen von Karl's, was etwas Verwirrung schaffen kann. Die Hellmesberger waren noch eine Musikerfamilie in wenigstens drei generationen, aber nur Großvater Josef (der ältere) hatte wirklichen Erfolg, unter anderem mit seiner Wiener Ballszene. Carl Millöcker schrieb Tänze und dirigierte, war aber 1882 mit seiner Operette sehr erfolgreich und gab seine Dirigentenposition auf. Leider erreichte er nie wieder einen ähnlichen Erfolg und rutschte ohne eigenes Orchester in den Hintergrund. In den Wiener Vororten spielten die Brüder Schrammel Schrammelmusik. Beide starben aber als 43-Jährige - in 1893 bzw. 1895. Émile Waldteufel war eine französische Komponist und lebte in Paris, schrieb aber Tänze in Wienerstil - zum Beispiel eine Schlittschuhläufer-Walzer.

DA: Og jeg vil slutte dette afsnit med at omtale en dansk komponist, Hans Christian Lumbye (1810-1874), der arbejdede for Tivoli i København. Han skrev en masse fremragende værker, der imidlertid sjældent bliver hørt udenfor Danmark. Jeg vil imidlertid anbefale de ærede lyttere at lytte til værker som for eksempel Kjøbenhavns Jernbane Dampgalop (en forløber for Honegger's Pacific 231), Drømmebilleder (med zitarsolo), Champagnegalop (med affyring af en ægte champagneprop) eller nogle af de mange valse. Efter min ringe (og dybt partiske) mening står han ikke tilbage for de mere kendte kolleger i Wien, men har måttet betale prisen for at bo udenfor begivenhedernes centrum.

F4020a04 _ Lumbye og påfuglescenen i Tivoli.jpg
F4020a04 _ Lumbye og påfuglescenen i Tivoli.jpg (71.65 KiB) Viewed 336 times
1 x

User avatar
Iversen
Black Belt - 2nd Dan
Posts: 2614
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:36 pm
Location: Denmark
Languages: Monolingual travels in Danish, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Romanian and (part time) Esperanto
Ahem, not yet: Norwegian, Afrikaans, Platt, Scots, Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Albanian, Greek, Latin, Irish, Indonesian and a few more...
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1027
x 5680

Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Iversen » Tue Jan 14, 2020 12:34 am

Man könnte Felix ein Glückspilz nennen. Er wurde in 1807 in Hamburg geboren und konnte fast Klavier spielen, ehe er der Mutterleib verlassen hätte. Und dann haben sie ihn Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy getauft (die Familie war jüdisch, aber waren zur Christentum übergegangen), wonach er auch Orgel spielen und dirigieren konnte. Wegen die französische Besetzung von Hamburg müßten sie alle (auch seine drei Geschwister) nach Berlin flüchten, wo er die erste Musikunterreicht erhielt (oder vielleicht erteilte?), und dann hatt er als dreizehnjähriger etwa 60 Werke geschrieben um allen zu zeigen wie einfach das Komponieren ist. In 1829 hat er die Matthäus-Passion von Bach zum ersten Mal nach dem Tod des alten Meisters aufgeführt und ihn dabei wieder in die Gewogenheit des Publikums gerückt.

Er hat fünf Sinfonien geschrieben - eigentlich hätte er bereits 13 als kind davon geschrieben, aber weil sie nur für Streicher waren, haben die Bläser ihr Veto eingelegt, und nur die letzten fünf zählen. Davon hat die erste (von 1824) kein Namen, aber die darauf folgende vier heißen Lobgesang, die Italienische, die Schottische und die Reformation. Eigentlich hat er England und Schottland vor Italien besucht, aber die Schottische Symphonie ist langsamer als die Italienische und mußte darüber hinauf auch auf die Ouverturen der Hebriden und Meeresstille und Glückliche Fahrt warten.

Während die Reise nach England hat er auch die dortige Queen besucht, und Victoria hat ihm sein ihr Mendelssohn'schen Lieblingslied erwähnt. Betenrot im Gesicht hat er dann zugeben müssen, daß gerade die hatte seine Schwester Fanny geschrieben - aber weil Frauen in der damaligen Biedermeierkultur diskriminiert wurden ("Kinder, Kirche, Küche"), wurde das Lied im namen des Bruders veröffentlicht. Und er dachte vermutlich, dies war ganz im Ordnung, aber er wagte es wahrscheinlich nicht, dies der Königin Vic zu sagen. Die reise nach England hat ihn übrigens noch zu ein Meisterwerk inspiriert: er hatte bereit als 17-jähriger die Ouvertüre zu den Sommernachtstraum von Shakespeare geschrieben, und die Engländer haben ihn offensichtlich mit Recht gefragt, was aus dem Rest geworden sei - und dann mußte er den Rest der Musik für die Komödie des Barden schreiben.

Und dann ist er gestorben, nur 38 Jahren alt.

Fingals Cave, Hebriden (Wikipedia).jpg
Fingals Cave, Hebriden (Wikipedia).jpg (12.28 KiB) Viewed 301 times

Robert Schumann war kein Wunderkind und - wie es sich allmählich herausstellte - auch keiner Glückspilz. Außer im Frage Liebe. Er galt als ausgesprochener Sprachtalent, aber wollte unbedingt Konzertpianist werden, hat sich aber dann irgendwie seinen rechten Hand geschädigt und mußte sich darum als Komponist umdefinieren. Aber vor dies geschah hat er Klavierunterricht von Friedrich Wieck erhalten (und ein Jahr lang auch bei ihm gewohnt), und dieser Mann hatte eine Tochter Clara, die natürlich auch von ihm Klavierunterreicht bekam... und Robert Schumann hat sie rund 1828 getroffen und sich hoffnungslos in ihr verliebt. Im Jahre 1835 haben die beiden sich zum ersten Male geküßt, und bald danach sich heimlich verlobt. Vatti Wieck hat diese Entwicklung gar nicht gemocht, und er hat versucht, die zwei von einander zu trennen. Aber vergebens - im Jahre 1840 haben die beiden Turteltauben geheiratet.

Kunst159.JPG
Kunst159.JPG (42.82 KiB) Viewed 304 times

Vor der Hochzeit hatte Robert fast nur Klaviermusik geschrieben, aber im Jahre 1840 (nach der Hochzeit) schrieb er eine wahre Sinnflut von Werken, darunter viele Lieder (teilweise gemeinsam mit seiner Frau), aber auch die erste von vier Symphonien. Und Vatti Wieck war dabei nur ein böser alter Mann, der das junge Glück die beiden nicht fördern würde - oder wie? Hm, eigentlich hatte der alte Bösewicht Recht. Schumann war ein psychisch instabiler, ältlicher Mann (un dazu noch ein mittelmäßiger Pianist), der seine minderjährige Tochter Clara seit ihrem neunten Lebensjahr verfolgte und allmählich ihr das Kopf verdrehte, und tatsächlich begann er tatsächlich nach das Glucksjahr 1840 allmählich den Wahnsinn zu entwickeln, von dem er letztendlich in einer psychiatrischen Anstalt nahe Bonn im Jahr 1846 starb. Clara hörte dann größtenteils auf selbst zu komponieren, wurde jedoch stattdessen eine gefeierte Konzertpianistin und Klavierlehrerin, und während dieser späten Zeit wurde sie Mentorin und Freundin eines anderen aufstrebenden jungen Komponisten namens Brahms.

Johannes Brahms, geboren in Hamburg in 1833, war Sohn vom eine Cafémusiker, der ihn die erste Musikunterricht erteilte. Ab 1840 (also vom Alter sieben) nahm er Klavierunterricht bei einem gewissen Cossel, der andeutete, daß seiner Schüler hätte einer glänzenden Konzertpianist werden können, wenn er nicht so viel Zeit auf das Komponieren vergeudet hätte. Johannes hat aber nicht damit aufgehört, und noch während des Lebens von Robert hat er das Ehepaar Schumann in Düsseldorf augesucht und wurde einer guter Freund der beide. Und die Freundschaft mit Clara hat bis seiner Tod überlebt. Er hat übrigens auch andere wichtige Kontakte während dieser Zeit gemacht, darunter zum Verleger Simrock und dem Violinist Joachim.

Die Musik von Brahms wird oft als späte Hochromantik bezeichnet und ist vollblütig, klangvoll, oft ganz kontrapunktisch und relativ konservativ. Der Dirigent Bülow hat von den drei B's gesprochen und dabei Bach, Beethoven und Brahms gemeint. Er hat auch die erste sinfonie von Brahms scherzhaft als die zehnte von Beethoven bezeichnet, was nicht ohne Basis wäre: Brahms hat daran von etwa 1862 bis 1876 genorgelt bis eine fertige Symphonie davon entstanden ist, und diese lange Wartezeit wird oft der übertriebene Ehrfurcht des Komponisten vor dem großen Vorbild zugeschrieben. Die folgende 3 Sinfonien, 4 Konzerte, 26 Ungarische Tänze uzw. haben glücklicherweise nicht ganz so viel Zeit erfordert.

Als aber ein gewisser Wagner auftauchte, spaltete sich die Musikwelt in Brahmsianer und Wagnerianer auf, und da die Zeit hier in Dänemark jetzt 1:35 ist und Brahms und Wagner sich wahrscheinlich nicht gegenseitig vertragen könnten, werde ich hier halten und von Wagner und seiner Anhänger Morgen in der nächsten Folge erzählen (damit nochmals eine Mitteilung auf Deutsch - oops!).

Gute Nacht.

Brahms (Wikipedia).jpg
Brahms (Wikipedia).jpg (20.78 KiB) Viewed 304 times
1 x

User avatar
Iversen
Black Belt - 2nd Dan
Posts: 2614
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:36 pm
Location: Denmark
Languages: Monolingual travels in Danish, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Romanian and (part time) Esperanto
Ahem, not yet: Norwegian, Afrikaans, Platt, Scots, Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Albanian, Greek, Latin, Irish, Indonesian and a few more...
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1027
x 5680

Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Iversen » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:36 am

Wagner war kein guter Mensch, aber er hat Musik geschrieben die die Richtung der ganzen Westerländische Musik umgestaltet hat. Als junger Mensch hat er seine einzige Symphonie zu Mendelssohn in Leipzig geschicht - und dort ist sie irgenwie verschollen. Niemand weiß, ob dies durch ein Fehler von Mendelssohn persönlich geschehen ist, aber Wagner hat ihn seitdem gehasst. (und keine zweite Symphonie jemals geschrieben). Er hat sich auch vom französischen Operakomponist Meyerbeer beeinflüssen lassen, aber ihn danach als Jude denunziert und gehasst. Er mußte von Platz zu Platz fliehen wegen unbezahlte rechnungen und politische Aktivitäten, aber hat im ekzentrischen könig Ludwig II von Bayern ein großzügigen Mäzen gefunden, und letzendlich hat er so etwas wie ein Tempel für seine Musik in Bayreuth geschaffen, geleitet von seinen Nachkommen.

Bereits in 1850 hat er "Das Judenthum in der Musik" unter ein Pseudonym publiziert. Übrigens hat er auch immer seine eine Libretti geschrieben - selbstgemacht ist gut gemacht... gut, vielleicht nicht hier, aber die Libretti haben ihren Zweck erfüllt. Hitler hat seine Musik geliebt und ihn fast zu so etwas wie einen deutschen Nationalkomponist gemacht (eifrig vom Priestertum in Bayreuth unterstützt, - aber kuriöserweise nicht von Goebbels oder andere leitende Nazikoryfäen). Also ohne Diskussion eine umstrittene Figur, aber auch ein brillanter Komponist. Obwohl er bis auf wenige Ausnahmen nur Opern geschrieben hat, habe ich von ihm mere als fünf Stunden in meiner eigenen Sammlung ohne dabei eine einzige Minute von Gesang dabei einzuschließen.

Seine erste Opern (Liebesnot, Feen, Rienzi uzw.) werden heute selten gespielt. Die nächsten Opern (Der Fliegende Holländer, Tannhäuser, Lohengrin) haben alle excellente Ouvertüren und Intermezzi geliefert, und Tannhäuser noch dazu eine Venusberg-Musik, für das anspruchsvolle französische Opernpublikum geschrieben. Auf seiner Höhe als Komponist schrieb er vor allem die Tetralogie "Der Ring", bestehend aus Rheingold, Walküre, Parsifal und Götterdämmerung, aber in freien Stunden fand er dabei auch Zeit, die innovative Tristan und Isolde sowie die rekordlange Meistersinger zu schreiben - die letzere als einzige Komische Oper von Wagner angesehen, aber so enorm urkomisch ist dieser Monster von einer Oper wohl auch nicht - besonders nach fünf Stunden. Nach Beendigung des Ringes schrieb der alte Mann dann Parsifal, die so stark nach Christentum roch, daß beispielsweise Nietszche Wagner nicht mehr unterstützen konnte. Interessant is das keiner dieser Opern antiken Themen hatten, wie sonst gewöhnlich.

Kunst001a-Der-Fliegende-Holländer.jpg
Kunst001a-Der-Fliegende-Holländer.jpg (10.03 KiB) Viewed 287 times

Von den angeblichen Nachfolger von Wagner möchte ich zuerst Anton Bruckner erwähnen, ein angesehender Organist, aber mit der Mentälität eines einfachem, tief religiözen österreichen Bauers. Kuriözerweise hat nur wenige (und eher uninteressante) Orgelwerke von ihm überlebt, aber als 39-jähriger Mann hat er dann zuerst seine sogenannte Studiensinfonie geschrieben, dann die erste, gefolgt von der unnummerierte 'nullte', and danach Nummer 2, 3. uzw. bis hin sur unvollendete 9. Bruckner war unbestrittener Anhänger von Wagner und hat dem seinen dritten Sinfonie gewidmet, aber ganz oft hört man eher Einflüsse vom späten Schubert als von Wagner - und dabei auch so etwas wie ein Orgel als Orchester verkleidet.

Die Verehrung von Wagner hat aber bedeutet, daß er mit bitterem Widerstand von konservative Kritiker wie Hanslick kämpfen mußte, und mit seiner sanftmütige, von Unsicherheit geprägten disposition hat dies dazu geführt, daß er immer wieder seine Symphonien umarbeitet hat - oder andere haben das in seinem Namen getan. Heute möchten wir die 'wahren' Versionen wieder hören, und zuerst eine Ausgabe von Haas, später eine von Nowak, haben versucht, dieses Wunsch nachzukommen. Dazu kommt eine besondere Historie wegen des unvollendeten Finale des Neunten. Ich habe irgendwann etwas darüber geschrieben, aber habe dies nicht wiederfinden können. Es gibt tatsächlich sowohl voll orchestrierte Passagen als etliche rohe umfangreiche skizzen, aber nichts vom geplanten abschließende Quadrupelfuga. In seiner Not hat der sterbender Komponist gesagt, daß man vielleicht sein Te Deum als vierten Satz spielen könnte, und einige Dummköpfe haben diesen Vorschlag tatsächlich ernst genommen, aber für nüchternere Köpfe gibt es tatsächlich nur zwei Lösungen: entweder die Symphonie ohne Abschluß zu spielen oder eine der Rekonstruktionen zu verwenden (am liebsten die von Samale-Mazzuca-Phillips-Cohrs) . Persönlich bin ich ein begeisterter Befürworter der zweiten Option - in der Tat so sehr, daß ich mich heute einfach weigere, eine finalenlose Version anzuhören. Bruckner wollte vier Sätze, und jetzt können sein Wunsch folgen.

Mit Gustav Mahler ist etwas änliches passiert. Dieser Mann war viel weltoffenere, Jüdisch, sehr selbstbewust und kritisch, und wo die Sinfonien von Bruckner eher als gotische Katedralen vorkommen, sind die von Mahler mit alles mögliches gefüllt, von altmodische Ländler zu Amatörblasmusik - und mitunter nahezu kosmische Klänge. Er hat auch etliche eksotische Musikinstrumenten vorgeschrieben, wie Ambosse, Peitschen, Mandolinen und Wagner-Tuben. Und drei davon sind teilweise vokal (Nummer 2,3 und 8). Aber wie Bruckner ist auch Mahler während der Arbeit mit seiner letzten Sinfonie gestorben - in seinem Fall Nummer 10. Der lange erste Satz (der einige fremdartige Melodiegefüge und absolut erderschütternde Höhepunkte enthält) sowie der kurze dritte Satz, Purgatorio genannt, wurden größtenteils fertiggestellt, aber es gab dazu noch Skizzen für weitere drei Sätze - und die Witwe Alma verweigerte Wissenschaftlern und andere Komponisten lange den Zugang, sie zu studieren! Aber dieses Problem wurde letztendlich gelöst, und jetzt können wir glücklicherweise wohldokumentierte Aufnahmen mit allen fünf Sätze hören.

Der nächste Komponist, den ich erwähnen möchte, hieß Richard Strauß, aber er war mit den Walzerkönigen von Wien nicht verwandt. Er schrieb ein paar einstündige Symphonien (Alpensinfonie, Sinfonia Domestica), setzte sich aber mit Programmmusik und - später - Opern durch. Aber als alter Greis, zutiefst durch die Verwüstungen von Städte wie Dresden und Berlin erschüttert, hat er sein letztes Meisterwerk geschrieben, die Metamorphosen für 23 Solostreicher. Und er hat seinen Schwanengesang selbst beenden können.

Und dann ist es auch notwendig einer gewissen Arnold Schönberg zu erwähnen. Er hat zuerst schöne Werke wie Verklärte Nacht, Gurre-Lieder für Sänger und ein rekordverdächten Monsterorchester (in Guinness erwähnt) und sein op. 5 Pelleas und Melisande geschrieben. Diese Werke sind sehr romantisch, überspannt fast bis die Hysterie - und harmonisch immer noch im Dur-Moll-System verankert, aber dessen Grenzen stets auslotend. Schönberg leider hat auf diese offensichtliche Sackgasse falsch reagiert, indem er einfach Melodie und Harmonie mit seinem 12-Tonsystem abgeschaft hat. Er wußte immer noch, wie man ein Orchester benutzt, und so klangen auch seine späteren Werke nicht so wiederlich un unmusikalisch wie die ultrakurzen Produkte, die von zum Beispiel seinem Studenten Webern geschrieben wurden, aber im Nachhinein prägten Schönbergs Ideen einen Großteil der akademischen westlichen Musik des restlichen 20. Jahrhunderts. - eine wahre Tragödie.

Es gab aber ein Alternativ. Die bereits erwähnten Komponisten repräsentierten die Spätromantik (am Anfang auch Scönberg), aber nach dem Ersten Weltkrieg kam eine neue Generation von Komponisten mit einer nüchterneren Einstellung zur Musik. Insbesondere möchte ich darunter Paul Hindemith hervorheben, und von seinen Werken besonders die Symphonie "Mathis der Mahler" (nein, nicht DEN Mahler, außerdem gibt es eine gleichnamige Oper von ihm) sowie sein fröhliches und sehr Publikumsfreundliches Werk "Symphonische Metamorphose von Themen Carl Maria von Webers" (aus dessen Oper Turandot). Diese Musik ist eindeutig postromantisch, aber ohne durch rein theoretische Bestrebungen verzerrt zu werden. ... was die Nazis nicht davon abhielten, auch Hindemiths Musik als 'entartet' zu benennen, so daß er 1938 mit seiner Frau in die Schweiz fliehen mußte.

Der 'Matthis' war übrigens der altniederländische Maler Matthias Grünewald, bekannt für seine grausamen Kreuzigungsbilder.

S0316a02_Grünewald-in-Colmar.jpg
S0316a02_Grünewald-in-Colmar.jpg (16.72 KiB) Viewed 286 times
2 x

User avatar
mentecuerpo
Green Belt
Posts: 438
Joined: Sun Jun 23, 2019 6:15 am
Location: El Salvador, Centroamerica, but lives in Phoenix, Arizona.
Languages: Spanish (N) English (B2) Italian (A2) German (A1)
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 18#p155218
x 537

Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby mentecuerpo » Wed Jan 15, 2020 3:10 am

Iversen wrote:
SP El otro compositor que quiero mencionar aqui es su discipulo, padre Antonio Soler (sí, fue ordenado sacerdote!). En la década de 1960 yo compré un LP con seis de sus conciertos para dos instrumentos clave, que se tocaban alternando entre varias combinaciones di pequeños órganos y cémbalos. Y esa grabación todavía hace parte de mi colección, pero ahora como un archivo eletronico. Pero el trabajo más cautivador de Soler es indudablemente su fandango, aqui en una grabación con notas. ¿Se puede sentir la influencia de los gitanos?


Señor Iversen, muchas gracias por acompañar su introducción a la história de la música con los ejemplos en YouTube. Este curso es mucho más interactivo y educativo.

Este linq no lo pude habrir:

Soler es indudablemente su fandango, aqui en una grabación con notas.
0 x

User avatar
Iversen
Black Belt - 2nd Dan
Posts: 2614
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:36 pm
Location: Denmark
Languages: Monolingual travels in Danish, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Romanian and (part time) Esperanto
Ahem, not yet: Norwegian, Afrikaans, Platt, Scots, Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Albanian, Greek, Latin, Irish, Indonesian and a few more...
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1027
x 5680

Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Iversen » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:38 am

SP: Gracias a Mentecuerpo por seguir de cerca este hilo. Sin ambargo voy a corregir lel enlace defectuoso.

En principio, se podría proporcionar enlaces a todos las obras específicas mencionadas en el texto, pero es posible que no estemos de acuerdo sobre qué versión es la mejor - mejor dejar este trabajo al distinguido lector. Mencioné una versión específica del fandango de Soler porque aquellos de Vd. que pueden leer musica pueden usar ventajosamente una versión con visualización simultánea de notas.

Youtube tiene su propia función de búsqueda incorporada, y se podria esperar que funcione como lo hace la búsqueda de Google, pero no es tan bueno. Es una buena idea buscar compositores con nombre y apellido para evitar 'ruido', pero es una mala idea usar signos para excluir elementos no deseados (como "-sonata" para evitar sonatas). Esto dará lugar a mucho más basura, no menos. En el lado positivo, se puede deducir que hay una traducción oculta, por ejemplo, si yo busco "sinfonía", la función de búsqueda de Youtube también muestra elementos con "symphony", y aplausos por esto.

EN: And by the way, I promised to write a little about the music of the low countries - i.e. the Netherlands and Belgium. I have already mentioned that this area produced a lot of musicians with international careers during the late medieval period and the renaissance, and the Dutch printing houses were also very productive. DU:Ik kan mij niet onthouden op deze plek Jan Pieters Sweelinck te noemen, een van de belangrijkste orgaan componisten uit de Renaissance, maar hij was niet de enige succesvolle Nederlandse komponist van deze tijd.

F4814a02 _ Het orgel van Grote Sint Bavo, Haarlem.jpg
F4814a02 _ Het orgel van Grote Sint Bavo, Haarlem.jpg (27.32 KiB) Viewed 230 times

EN: During the baroque period the Netherlands had some excellent composers, like for instance Pieter Hellendaal and de Fesch, but few people have heard about them ... an Italian name simply sold better. Which may be the reason that six excellent works named "Concerti Armonici" were ascribed to Pergolesi (1710-1736), who had become famous by writing the opera "La Serva Padrona" - and then conveniently dying at a young age so that he couldn't protest. It took the musicologists some time to find the real composer, but it turned out to be a Dutchman named Unico Wilhelm van Wassenaer.

FR: Il devient un peu plus difficile d'identifier des compositeurs romantiques de renommée mondiale (je n'avait aucun problème à trouver des compositeurs universellement reconnus quand j'ai raconté de l'Autriche et l'Allemagne) - ce qui est étrange, compte tenu de la population (current Belgium: 11½, Netherlands: 17 million). Mais les Walloniens peuvent se cacher parce qu'ils ont des noms à consonance française - comme Vieuxtemps ou Ysaÿe ou César Franck - eh bien, en tout cas Vieuxtemps et Franck, Ysaÿe peut-être pas tellement avec ce drôle de trema sur le y. Pourtant les compositeurs vallons ont eu une tendance à fuir à Paris aussi vite que possible, où l'on parlaient largement la même langue - ils devraient seulement de garder de dire "octante" pour quatre-vingt-dix, ce qui les aurait aussitôt dévoilés comme des immigrés.

Mais pour ce faire il faut avoir quelque chose à vendre, et ce n'est probablement pas par hasard que les deux premiers étaient des virtuoses du violon et monsieur Franck sur les orgues - mais aussiöt qu'ils se sont fait connaître sur le marché international, ils ont tous les trois commencé à composer. Franck eut en effet un tel succès avec cela qu'il est devenu le compositeur d'orgue dominant de sa génération, avec des œuvres comme par example les trois chorals pour grand orgue - et sans doute avait-it un grand orgue à sa disposition, ayant été employé à Sainte Clotilde à Paris où le célèbre Cavaillé-Coll venait d'installer un bel orgue neuf à trois claviers. Son oeuvre pour d'autres instruments est limitée, mais de haute qualité. Essayez par example d'écouter Les Éolides ou Le Chasseur Maudit. Ou la seule sonate pour violon et piano, où le violin joue la même mélodie que le piano, seulement une mesure plus tard - ce qui constitue une démonstration presque vantard de savoir-fair:

César Franck - sonate, 4 mouv.jpg
César Franck - sonate, 4 mouv.jpg (23.24 KiB) Viewed 230 times

DU: Wie heeft er ooit gehoord van Alphonsus Johannes Maria Diepenbrock? Probeer hem op te zoeken op YouTube en luister - hij heeft eigenlijk heel wat mooie muziek geschreven, maar met die naam ... Hij promoveerde met summa cum laude op een dissertatie over Lucius Annaeus Seneca, getiteld "L. Annaei Senecae philosophi Cordubensis vita". Respekt! Maar hij ontving ook muzieklessen als kind, dus later werd hij zowel auteur als componist. De Nederlandse Wikipedia vermeldt, bijna met spijt, dat hij geen specifiek Nederlands 'geluid' het gezocht:

"Dit neemt niet weg, dat in tegenstelling tot het werk van Zweers en Wagenaar van typerend Nederlandse eigenschappen in zijn werk nauwelijks sprake kan zijn".

Met schaamte moet ik toegeven dat ik niet geloofde dat zo'n speciaal Nederlands geluid bestond - ik kan het ook nietzo'n geluid horen in de muziek van Waagenaar (die ik leuk vind - die van Zweers heb ik nooit gehoord). Misschien kunnen sommige autochtone Nederlanders het nationale merk daarin horen - maar als niet, is het misschien ook niet belangrijk. Het is nog steeds goede en eufone muziek - probeer het op te zoeken op YouTube (wat misschien de enige plek is waar je deze muziek kunt horen).

Aan de volgende generatie behoren namen als Willem Frederik Johannes Pijper en Franciscus Florentinus (Flor) Peeters, en een beetje later kun je de naam van Hendrik Herman (Henk) Badings noteren, die eigenlijk in Nederlands Indonesië is geboren ... en dan kun je raden wat er nu gebeurt:

IND: Ya, Anda sekarang mendapatkan cerita tentang komposer badings dalam Bahasa Indonesia - harus menggunakan peluang yang muncul! Badings lahir di Bandung, Jawa, tetapi keluarganya menyeretnya kembali ke Belanda pada usia delapan tahun, di mana belajar di Delft.

DU: Tijdens de Tweede Wereldoorlog was hij hoofd van het conservatorium in Den Haag, maar verhuisde vrijwillig naar Dresden, wat een beetje vuil in zijn curriculum vitae gaf - het leverde hem inderdaad een beroepsverbod na de oorlog, maar in 1947 werd dit ingetrokken. Zijn componistenwerk valt het meest op door de 14 symfonieën - Cesar Franck schreef ervan slechts één.
2 x

User avatar
Iversen
Black Belt - 2nd Dan
Posts: 2614
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:36 pm
Location: Denmark
Languages: Monolingual travels in Danish, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Romanian and (part time) Esperanto
Ahem, not yet: Norwegian, Afrikaans, Platt, Scots, Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Albanian, Greek, Latin, Irish, Indonesian and a few more...
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1027
x 5680

Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Iversen » Thu Jan 16, 2020 9:33 am

According to the plan I published last Sunday you might now expect to seen three rants about Nordic music, and then one or two about Russian music etc. later. Well, I have changed my mind. You get the British music today, the Nordic next week and then there will be a break before I continue with the Russian, Eastern European, Italien, Spanish, French and American music. But you will get it all - it's simply too much fun to write about something that is both concrete and comprehensive enough to form a whole project - and which also gives me an excellent excuse for writing in other languages than English. Alas, today's message will be entirely in English - so no fun today...

Last time I mentioned England was when I wrote about G.F. Handel - the guy who dropped his trema somewhere in the North Sea. He died in 1757. There is page on with a chronological list over English composers, and it claims that just about everything that happened after that year belonged to the classical era. But listen to the music and you discover that this is wrong. Good solid Brits like Boyce, Arne and Stanley wrote baroque music right up to at least 1780, and England was the only place in Europe where a man like C.F.Abel could continue to write music and arrange concerts with music for the viola da gamba. He was actually a German (and successor to J.S.Bach at the court in Cöthen), but on the continent the Baroque had passed its heyday already at the death of Bach in 1750, and Abel moved to good ol' conservative England, where the instrument still was popular among the wealthy burghers.

But the Classicism did eventually reach Britain - the piano concerts of James Hook (1746 – 1827) were undeniably classical, and so were the works of William Herschel, who together with his sister discovered the planet Uranus. But already with the nocturnes of Irishman John Field we have reached the early romanticism. By the way, he didn't stay on the green island: first he went to London with his family, and then he embarked on long concert trips on the continent. If you look at the chronological lists over Irish and Scottish composers you'll see very few wellknown names - and most of the few that belong to those areas couldn't resist the temptation to go to London (like insects around a lamp in the darkness of night).

The funny thing is that a fair number of composers - many from other countries (like Mendelssohn) - let themselves be inspired by Irish and not least Scottish folk music. Listen for instance to the variations on the Scots tune "Lee Rig" by the English-American composer Reinagle. A few even tried to integrate the bagpipe into the orchestra, but since its intonation is somewhat idiosyncratic that's not an easy task.

The first reasonably wellknown romantic composers (apart from Field) were H.Parry and William Sterndale Bennett. Bennett wrote some good solid orchestral pieces, while the fame of Parry rests on one simple work, the hymn Jerusalem, which is performed at each and every Last Prom concert in London. Another, slighter later composer with a permanent place on those prom concerts is Edward Elgar, mostly because of the first of his five Pomp and Circumstance marches - but try to listen to the whole set. However he also wrote other impressive orchestral works - OK, maybe not his two interminably long symphonies, but things like the Enigma Variations on a theme which he kept secret. A lot of people have tried to find out what this theme might be, but personally I couldn't care less. My own favorites among the orchestral works are "In the South - Alassio" and the cello concerto, whose best performance ever was delivered by Jacqueline du Pré - although it has to be said that the recording now sounds slightly dated.

F1340a01_Damascus Gate, Jerusalem.jpg
F1340a01_Damascus Gate, Jerusalem.jpg (25.53 KiB) Viewed 195 times

From Elgar's time and later there is no dearth of splendid British composers, and it is hard to choose which ones to mention here. So let me - totally out of the blue - take dame Ethel Smyth, a fine composer and staunch suffragette, whose most important work was the opera "The Wreckers". And after that composers like Delius, Bax, Holst and Ireland. And no: Ireland was not Irish - he was born in Cheshire in a family with Scottish roots (which he didn't exploit). He mostly wrote songs, but also some short orchestral works and piano pieces in a pleasant style with a new age tinge. Another composer with similar leanings: Cyril Scott.

Arnold Bax was a prolific composer with a knack for atmospheric and clever orchestration, but sometimes his textures are somewhat overdone, and to be honest, he was not the one to come up with memorable tunes. Still, works like Tintagel or Roscatha or The Garden of Fand deserve to be kept alive.

Frederick Theodore Albert Delius (originally FRITZ Delius) was born into a wealthy commercial family that tried to force him to follow the family tradition - to the extent that his father sent him to Florida to manage an orange plantation. Well, he rebelled and went back to London to become a composer - but did later write a suite called Florida and a string of other works with a clear American stamp, like the Hiawatha suite and the Appalachia variations. The thing that has made him most famous is that he became blind and paralysed in 1918 because of of syphilis which he may have contracted during some rambustically wild stays in Paris in his younger days. He did continue to compose with the help of his amanuensis Fenby, but of course at a slower pace.

Holst is very wellknown because of one work, his suite The Planets. It totally deserves all the accolades it has received, but later in life the composer became slightly irritated with its fame because it meant that nobody listened to anything else he had written. Which is a pity, since his work list does contain some real gems. Some of these works are suites like the ubiquitous Planets, for instance the Moorside Suite and Brook Green suite. As these two show there was a trend to publish suites and other works with melodies (or inspired by melodies) from a certain part of Britain. Like the Gloustershire Rhapsody by Ivor Bertie Gurney, who returned from the second world war as a broken man and died in a mental institution. An equally sad case is Morfydd Llwyn Owen from Wales (1891-1918), who over a period of just 10 years wrote some 250 works, but died just short of her 27. birthday due to complications around an operation for acute appendicitis (or, as the surgeon himself acknowledged, from administering the wrong kind of anaesthetic to a sugar deprived patient).

Before we hasten on, let's not forget a colourful character like Albert William Ketèlbey, who despite being British to the root wrote a long series of popular works with exotic names. Like for instance the immortal "In a Persian Market" from 1920, where you clearly can hear the rumble and bustle of a chaotic Middle East market. Other pieces depict scenes from China, Egypt, Meissen in Germany, gipsies at an unknown location and a quiet monastery garden somewhere in the Mediterranean. Unfortunately these pieces are often marred by the intrusion of choirs so in my personal collection I have had to cut out the offending passages. By the way, Kipling wrote his poem Mandalay without ever having been to the place, but he should have known that the town of Mandalay lies inland, quite far from the Siamese Bay - and I can promise you that there aren't any flying fish in the lake around the central palace area. But Kipling did stay for some time in India, though I doubt that he ever met Mowgli and the other animals from the Jungle Booke there.

F4314a01_Mandalay.jpg
F4314a01_Mandalay.jpg (25.42 KiB) Viewed 195 times

Ralph Vaughan-Williams was born in 1872, but lived on and on until 1958, and was active as a composer even in his ripe old age. One of his most renowned works, the Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis, was written relatively early, in 1910. As you may remember, Thomas Tallis (1505-1585) was the man who wrote Spem an Alium for no less than forty voices - long before both the invention of the Guiness Record Book and the current interest in aliens from outer space. The amazing thing is how Vaughan-Williams manages to preserve the atmosphere of an old English cathedral like those where a piece by Mr. Tallis may have been sung. By the way, as a language buff I can't resist the temptation to quote a passage from the memorial plaque for Tallis:

Entered here doth ly a worthy wyght,
Who for long tyme in musick bore the bell:
His name to shew, was THOMAS TALLYS hyght,
In honest virtuous lyff he dyd excell.

He serv’d long tyme in chappel with grete prayse
Fower sovereygnes reygnes (a thing not often seen);
I meane Kyng Henry and Prynce Edward’s dayes,
Quene Mary, and Elizabeth oure Quene.

Apart from this Vaughan-Williams wrote nine symphonies. No. 1 is a choral hodge-podge (which has prevented me from listening to it), and no. 7 Antartica was originally written as film music, but is still quite interesting. The remaining symphonies are strikingly different, but all real masterworks, each in its own way. And of course he also wrote some scenic music and short orchestral works, like "In the Fen country", the "English Folk song suite" and "The Lark Ascending" with a solo violin twitching somewhere up into the stratosphere - but the population segment that has most reason to be greatful to this composer are the tuba players, because he did write one of the few available concertos for their instrument.

F4244a03_the Fen country as seen from the train to Great Yarmouth.jpg
F4244a03_the Fen country as seen from the train to Great Yarmouth.jpg (10.37 KiB) Viewed 195 times

From the generation after Vaughan-Williams - but not necessarily more longlived than him - I would mention people like Arthur Bliss (film score for Things to Come), Bridge (The Sea), Eric Coates (for a string of popular orchestral pieces), William Walton (not least for his music to the film Henry V, built on the play by Shakespeare), 'Peter Warlock' (a pseudonym - composed the archaizing "Gloriana"), John McCabe (for his Chagall Windows, actually real windows at the Hadassah Hospital of Jerusalem) and ... well, let's end the list of composers with Benjamin Britten, not so much because of his many operas (though "Peter Grimes" does contain some excellent orchestral snippets) as because of his pedagogical masterpiece "The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra" - here in a version with the complete score (albeit it has to be admitted that it is unreadable at this resolution). The theme for this piece was borrowed from Purcell's opera Abdolazar .

Britten_Young persons guide page one.jpg
Britten_Young persons guide page one.jpg (23.16 KiB) Viewed 195 times
2 x

User avatar
mentecuerpo
Green Belt
Posts: 438
Joined: Sun Jun 23, 2019 6:15 am
Location: El Salvador, Centroamerica, but lives in Phoenix, Arizona.
Languages: Spanish (N) English (B2) Italian (A2) German (A1)
Language Log: https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 18#p155218
x 537

Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby mentecuerpo » Fri Jan 17, 2020 4:21 pm

Iversen wrote:Italian is actually one of my oldest languages, and the reason is that it has been the traditional language for indication og tempo and all other things in classical scores. So first I borrowed an Italian dictionary at the library, and then I became interested and borrowed a textbook too. In modern scores it has become more common to use your national languages, but Italian is still the default language of music

So with that in mind, let's have a peek at the Italian music scene in the 18.century. We have already seen some of the names for typical forms appear during the renaissance (you may remember mister Gabrieli), in the baroque period the sometimes change their meaning. For instance the sonata became a piece in several movements for one or two melody instruments and basso continuo. Basso continuo was typically a harpsichord plus a bass instrument, typically a viola da gamba - you remember: the bowed string instruments with a body that slopes toward the neck. In English the 'gamba' is often called "viole", but in German and Danish we call them 'gamber'. The alternative was a viola da braccio, and .. well, the "viola" (German "Bratsch") is a member of that family, but basically it is the modern bowed string instruments minus the doublebass. And of course they have italian names: violino (the small one), viola and violoncello (the big one). And some clever guy got the excellent idea to add a pin at the bottom of the 'cello - but only after the baroque period. So baroque cellists still had to keep the instrument between the legs.

As for the symphony - it was called "sinfonia" in Italian, but so far the name was mainly used about opera preludes. "Concerto" became a very commonly used name, but one special use should be noted: "concerto grosso" is a concert (on three movements) for a small soloist group and orchestra (which at this point generally consists of first and second violins, violas, celli + doublebasses (who played the same notes, just an octave apart)). However the composers also wrote 'concerti' with several soloist instruments. And one thing more about concertos: they became more and more difficult to play - not least the violin concertos. However the virtuoso keyboard concerts only came later.


Mr. Iversen,

I hope you don't mind; I feel bad interrupting your writings with my silly comments.

Why do you think Italian is de default language for music terminology?

Why do you think the movements were created? I think it helps with the overall mood that the music transmits to the public as the music contnues. I know some movements may be called allegro, which obviously, it will a joyful music.

the Concerto Grosso, became more challenging to play due to the difficult soloist part, I would imagine.

One other thing to comes in mind at the concerto started to incorporate more instruments; I would imagine there was a need for a coordinator — the conductor, or in Spanish, El Director de la Orquesta. I am sure you mentioned a coordinator of sorts when the choirs were created in Italy.
0 x

User avatar
Iversen
Black Belt - 2nd Dan
Posts: 2614
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:36 pm
Location: Denmark
Languages: Monolingual travels in Danish, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Romanian and (part time) Esperanto
Ahem, not yet: Norwegian, Afrikaans, Platt, Scots, Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Albanian, Greek, Latin, Irish, Indonesian and a few more...
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1027
x 5680

Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Iversen » Mon Jan 20, 2020 11:41 pm

You are very welcome to ask for clarifications - I have certainly left some loose ends dangling.

I have not written that Italian has become the default language because of some metaphysical ideas about the supremacy of Italian music, but simply because almost all composers have used either Italian OR their native language in their scores. And this is very close to the definition of 'default': something which you use if you don't have an overriding reason to use something else.

As for the order of movements most people probably think in terms dictated by the symphonies and chamber music written by people like Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and the following generations of romantic composers. And here the norm says a moderately fast (and long) movement first and a fast one at the end, and in between a slow one and a dance in triple time (menuet, later scherzo). And it is definitely worth asking why it became like that. First it would be relevant to point out that the first movement often has a slow introduction, so it is not just a question of starting off with something invigorating. One principle is that slow and fast movements should alternate, but the intrusion of a menuet spoils this pattern (except that most menuets were in the form ABA, with B being a slower and more gentle trio). In concertos it is very rare to have a trio or scherzo - they are generally in three movements. So my answer would be that it is a pure coincidence with no logical justification that the norm for symphonies became four movements and three for concertos. Actually you could see the shift from a relative slow and stiff-legged menuet to a fast scherzo AND the fact that Beethoven moved it from the 3. to the 2. second position as some kind of rebellion against the classical pattern - but then the new default order became the one he introduced, and only a few symphonies differed from this pattern (like the Pathétique by Tschaikovsky).

As for the need of a conductor: a few ensembles have dispensed with this, and some musicians have tried both to conduct and play at the same time. Actually Bach lead his musicians from the harpsichord, so this practive has long roots. But if you go back to the renaissance then small groups of singers and instrumentalists managed to play/sing the complicated polyphonic works of their time from separate note sheets without even the help of a decent score, and this is also how chamber ensembles normally function - so as long a group is small enough to permit each musician to keep contact to his/her co-players it doesn't seem to be necessary to have some overlord hopping and dancing in front of them. However with larger ensembles it seems to be necessary to have someone with the power to cut through and dictate how the music should sound. Which is one reason that I never really felt at ease as an orchestral musician.

And now for something completely different: DANSK MUSIK !!

And of course I have to start the rant by mentioning the bronce lurs which have been found in several bogs. They were apparently always played in pairs, which together with the 'burial' in bogs clearly indicates that these instruments only were used for ritual purposes. What music they were used is anyone's guess, but they had the usual overtones of a valveless brass instrument.

Arkæologi.JPG
Arkæologi.JPG (8.44 KiB) Viewed 115 times

It is also totally unkown how Danish music sounded during the iron age and the subsequent viking age. We know that wandering bards visited the halls of noblemen and kings, and the sagas and other sources that refer to this age also quote song texts, which may or may not have been transferred through the ages to the writers from around 1200 who noted them down. The oldest known melody in Ancient Danish was found in the margin of Codex Runicas, a law book written in runes on animal hides around 1300 BC. The text is "Drømdæ mik æn drøm i nat um silki ok ærlik pæl". The meaning of "ærlik pæl" isn't quite clear, but most scholars think that "pæl" is some kind of cloth, and then the whole thing means something like "(I) dreamt me a dream this night about silk and honest 'pæl'". There are several versions on youtube, but this one has the advantage that it also shows an instrument that could have been used by the wandering bards (although the specimen showed is a copy of an Anglosaxon lyre of kinds).

Drømde_mik.jpg
Drømde_mik.jpg (25.64 KiB) Viewed 115 times

After the christianization the monks and priesters would have tried have sung the same things as in the rest of Europe - whether they succeeded from the onset in copying their foreign collegues is a question.

The music pops up again at the court of Christian IV (who reigned 1588-1648): he paid the travel expenses to Venice for several Danish composers and had also hired John Dowland for a time - I have mentioned both things earlier in this series. However Denmark also had solid relations to Germany, not least because Schleswig-Holstein until 1864 still was part of the Danish kingdom. The most important baroque Danish composer was Dietrich Buxtehude, whose name points to a small town Southwest of Hamburg (i.e. NOT a Danish town). His parents lived for a time in Bad Oldesloe in Holstein (Danish at the time), but he was in all likelihood born in Helsingborg, where his father was an organist while the town still was Danish. Later, after the Swedish consquest, the family emigrated to Denmark and his father got a job in Helsingør (just across the water), and Dietrich also worked there. Bus alas, in 1667 Franz Tunder died, and Dietrich succeded him at the organ in St. Maria in Lübeck, which definitely wasn't Danish. So in all fairness we should say that Dietrich Buxtehude was Danish by birth, but became German too - and by any relevant yardstick he became one of the most important members of the Northern German organ school before Bach, whichever nationality you ascribe to him.

Later on we find some composers of popular vocal works, "syngespil" (singing plays"), with the most important being C.A. Thielo (1707 -1763), and we got visits from foreign composers like Sarti and Dupuy. The Italian Sarti got a license to establish something called "Den kongelige danske Skueplads", which later developed into "Det kongelige Teater" (The Royal Theater) - but because of this experiment he incurred an immense debt, and the dodgy tricks he used to earn money in the followed years led to his forced exile in 1775. As for Dupuy he was kicked out of Sweden in 1799 for singing songs that praised Napoleon, and in Copenhagen he married a Danish lady, but apparently also had an affair the crown princess - so goodbye Denmark. First he fled to Paris, but then returned to Sweden which now was ruled by the former French marshal Bernadotte, and here he was now rather more welcome. For a taste of his music try the elegant ouverture to "Ungdom og Galskab" (Youth and folly).

After the Napoleonic wars Russian took Finland from Sweden, and Sweden retaliated by taking Norway from the Danish-Norwegian kingdom. Which paradoxically led to a nationalistic cultural revival in the remaining miniput state Denmark, our socalled golden age ('Guldalder') - and therefore I'll now proudly switch to writing in Danish (but those of you who unfortunately still haven't learnt Danish are welcome to stuff the whole thing into Google Translate and see what comes out of the rear end of the behemoth).

DA: Og hvem var så de toneangivende komponister på denne tid? Jo, det var gode solide danske navne som Friedrich Ludwig Æmilius Kunzen (1761-1817), Claus Nielsen Schall (1757-1835), Franz Joseph Glæser (1798-1861), Christoph Ernst Friedrich Weyse 1774-1842, Daniel Friedrich Rudolph Kuhlau (1786-1832) og Johan Peter Emilius Hartmann (1805-1900). Tyskkyndige vil muligvis bemærke en germansk indflydelse i disse navne (omend nogle, såsom Glæser og Hartmann snarere havde familierelationer til Böhmen). Men de skrev musik til danske tekster, og de talte vistnok allesammen dansk, og de regnes helt klart for crème de la crème blandt danske komponister. Ikke mindst de to sidstnævnte.

Kuhlau var en tysk komponist, bosat i Hamburg, men flygtede til Danmark i 1810, da byen blev besat af franske tropper. Her skrev han liflig fløjtemusik og et utal af sonatiner som alverdens klaverelever siden har haft mere eller mindre glæde af. Men hans vigtigste værk er musikken til skuespillet Elverhøj (dvs. alfernes høj) med tekst af J.L.Heiberg. Kongesangen "Kong Christian stod ved højen mast" (med text af Ewald) indgår heri og indgår også i den fortræffelige ouverture. Den mest berømte udnyttelse af denne ouverture skete i en film ved navn "Olsenbanden ser rødt", hvor mesterbanditten Egon instruerer sine medhjælpere i at bore gennem murene under Det Kongelige Teater i takt til musikken - boret blev sat i muren i alle de mest støjende passager, og dirigenten oppe i salen var henrykt - aldrig havde højdepunkterne i musikken haft sådan en bragende effekt.

Kong Christian stod ved højen mast.jpg
Kong Christian stod ved højen mast.jpg (28.41 KiB) Viewed 115 times

J.P.E. Hartmann blev især kendt for musikken til Oehlenschläger's digt "Guldhornene", der handler om to gyldne horn fra jernalderen, der blev fundet i Sønderjylland, men siden stjålet og omsmeltet. Det ene horn bar en af de ældste Protonordiske indskrifter overhovedet: "Ek HlewagastR HoltingaR horna tawiðo" ('Jeg Lægæst fra Holte/Holte's søn gjorde dette horn'). Heldigvis havde man gamle afbildninger, men det københavnske borgerskab var dybt chokeret over tabet af disse historiske horn, og digteren Oehlenschläger reagerede ved at skrive et digt der starter således:

De higer og søger / I gamle Bøger, / I oplukte Høie / Med speidende Øie,
Paa Sværd og Skiolde / I muldne Volde, / Paa Runestene / Blandt smuldnede Bene.
Oldtids Bedrifter / Anede trylle; / Men i Mulm de sig hylle, / De gamle Skrifter.
Blikket stirrer, / Sig Tanken forvirrer. / I Taage de famle. (osv. osv.)


Personer der har forsøgt at læse oldnordisk kan måske genkende sig selv i disse linjer (EN: They yearn and search ....the gaze stares - the thought confuses itself - they fumble around in fog).

Den vigtigste komponist i generationen efter J.P.E. Hartmann var Niels W.Gade, der fik sit gennembrud som 24-årig ved at indsende sin Ossian-ouverture til en konkurrence. Dette var en koncertouverture inspireret af den blinde barde Ossian's skotske kvad. Problemet er bare at Ossian aldrig har eksisteret - han var et fantasiprodukt skabt af en luskefis ved navn MacPherson. Men da ouverturen kom Mendelssohn i hænde, blev han begejstret, og da Gade snart efter sendte sin første symfoni ned til ham i Leipzig, blev han inviteret derned og fik stillingen som den verdensberømte komponist og dirigents personlige assistent. Men så skete der to ting: først døde Mendelssohn i 1847, og Gade overtog hans stilling som chefdirigent for Gewandhausorkestret. Så kom så kom det egentlige Danmark i krig med hertugdømmerne Slesvig og Holsten i 1848, og Gade tog hjem. Så der røg chancen for at blive en verdenskendt tysk musiker, men Danmark fik til gengæld en 100% dansk superkomponist og dirigent og meget mere, der imidlertid sad tungt på landets musikliv som en overvægtig høne-mor til sin død. Gade's dominerende stilling betød at andre komponister fik vanskeligt ved at gøre sig gældende. Jeg vil dog nævne to der stadig huskes. Peter Erasmus Lange-Müller for musikken til eventyrkomedien "Der Var Engang" og Christian Frederik Emil Horneman for ouverturen til "Aladdin" og musikken til "Gurre".

Den tyske forbindelse blev endnu mere udtalt i den følgende generation med senromantikere som operakomponisten August Enna og symfonikeren Paul Klenau. Men så dukkede en vis Carl Nielsen op med en stil der var frisk og mere moderne, men stadigværk rimeligt publikumsvenlig - især i begyndelsen. Hvis jeg skulle fremhæve ét værk måtte det blive Aladdin-suiten, hvor den mest overraskende sats er 'Markedspladsen i Isfahan', hvor orkestret splittes i små grupper der spiller i hver sin rytme. Den slags lyder sjældent godt, men her lykkes eksperimentet fordi man virkelig ser et kaotisk orientalsk marked for sit indre blik. I sine symfonier starter han som en lidt frisk romantiker i nummer et, men bliver efterhånden mere modernistisk frem til nr. 6, Semplice - der aldeles ikke er simpel på nogen mulig måde.

Carl Nielsen's succes medførte at komponister som Klenau, Enna, Ludolf Nielsen, Fini Henriques, Simonsen og andre blev skubbet i baggrunden, og det er først i de senere år at nogle af dem igen er blevet taget til nåde. Den af de 'fortrængte' komponister der er blevet mest eftertrykkeligt genopdaget er nok Rued Langgaard, der måtte tage til takke med stillingen som organist ved domkirken i Ribe - næsten så langt væk fra København som man kan komme indenfor rigets grænser. Det indestængte raseri, kombineret med hans sværmeriske religiøsitet, resulterede i værker som operaen "Antikrist", "Vanvidsfantasi" for klaver og violinsonaten "Ecrasez l'infame". Men herudover skrev han også 16 symfonier, som nu alle er blevet indspillet efter at have samlet støv siden mellemkrigstiden.

S0539a01_Ribe-Domkirkes-Orgel-mm.jpg
S0539a01_Ribe-Domkirkes-Orgel-mm.jpg (22.17 KiB) Viewed 115 times

En anden mellemkrigskomponist, Poul Schierbeck, var lidt speciel ved at knytte sig til fransk musik, og hans kollega Knud-Åge Riisager (der også blev formand for Komponistforeningen) havde tendenser i samme retning. Sidstnævnte skrev bl.a. en ballet 'Etude' baseret på sene klaverstykker af Rossini, men herudover også det meget mærkelige orkesterværk Qarrtsiluni, der skal illustrere et grønlandsk sagn. Og i denne forbindelse kunne man også nævne et betydeligt senere værk af samme type, nemlig "Regnbueslangen" af Norby. Jeg kommer også til at tænke på nogle geologisk inspirerede værker (Hekla, Geysir) af den islandske komponist Jon Leifs - men det er jo en helt anden historie.

Jeg vil fatte mig i korthed om resten af musikken efter 2. verdenskrig. Den væsentligste symfoniker her er uden tvivl Vagn Holmboe (med 8 styks), men man bør vel også nævne Herman Koppel, der desuden var en fremragende pianist - og stamfader til et helt dynasti af musikere.
1 x

User avatar
Iversen
Black Belt - 2nd Dan
Posts: 2614
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:36 pm
Location: Denmark
Languages: Monolingual travels in Danish, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Romanian and (part time) Esperanto
Ahem, not yet: Norwegian, Afrikaans, Platt, Scots, Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Albanian, Greek, Latin, Irish, Indonesian and a few more...
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1027
x 5680

Re: Iversen's second multiconfused log thread

Postby Iversen » Tue Jan 21, 2020 3:37 pm

We still follow the great plan which I sketched the 12. January - except that Germany took more messages than expected and that I took Britain earlier than expected (before it sails away). Today I'll try to fit in both Sweden and Norway, and then Finland and the Baltics and Russia will come after that. So pick your link to Google Translate and prepare for a message in Swedish, followed by my feeble and errorridden attempt to write in a mixture between Bookish and New Norwegian - my apologies in advance to any resident Norwegians (at least to those who fancy true Nynorsk spelling).

SW: OK, svenska vikingar har också sjungit, men lyckligtvis finns det inte på Youtube. Sverige hade dock en utmärkt barockkomponist i form av Johan Helmich Roman (1694-1758), som tillbringade några år i London (där han verkade i Händels orkester), men återkallades och anställdes i det svenska Hofkapellet som ersättning för sin avlidne far. Hans viktigaste arbete från denna tid kom 1744 och kallas Drottningholmsmusikken, uppkallad efter slottet där musiken spelades till arvtalsparet Adolf Fredriks och Lovisa Ulrikas bröllop. Ock brölloppet varade uppenbarligen 51:35 minut. Redan 1745 utnävndas han dock till hovintendent ock avresta til Lilla Haraldsmåla i Ryssby socken, strax norr om Kalmar, där han stannade kvar till slutet av sina dagar. Men han fortsatte alttjämnt med at komponera ock efterlot så många verk att endast fortekningen i Vratblads biografi fyller 44 sidor.

F1735a03_Drottningholm.jpg
F1735a03_Drottningholm.jpg (18.54 KiB) Viewed 94 times

Den nästa jätten inom svensk musik är Franz Adolf Berwald (1796-1868), som INTE anställdes av den dåvarande hofstab, så eftersom Sverige var ett musikaliskt hål i jorden med få möjligheter att leva som kompositör, blev Berwald tvungen att ägna sig åt ortopediska aktiviteter, ock senare arbetade hann först vid ett glasverk och senare på ett tegelverk innan han fick föreläsa på konservatoriet i Stockholm 1867 - men innan ett år dog han. Det fanns inga pengar för en kista, och änkan fick ingen pension. Han hade förmodligen haft bättra chanser utomlands, eftersom särskilt hans symfonier är i nivå med tidenas bästa och han fick många utmärkelser under sina resor. Stylistiskt skulle jag beskriva dessa symfonier som paralleller till Beethovens, om än skrivna tjugo år senare. Det fanns minst fem symfonier, men en är med säkerhet förlorad och numreringen av de återstående fyra är osäker. Så är det att leva i utkanten av världen. Stackars Berwald.

På slutat av 1800-tallet kom flera romantiska kompositörer med mindre eländiga livscykler. Peterson-Berger skrev klaverstycker, pianostycken, av vilka några publicerades som Frösöblomster I, II and III. Frösö är en idyllisk ö i en sjö nära Östersund - ett utmärkt ställe att koppla av när han inte verkade som tidens mest fruktade musikkritiker i Stockholm. Peterson-Berger skrev också 5½ symfoni, men kollega hans Kurt Atterberg skrev hela nio - den bästa är enligt min mening nummer två. Lite senare i världshistorien kommer Ture Rangström, som bara skrev fyra symfonier, men de är i sin tur toppklass. Nämnas bör också Wilhelm Stenhammer, som bara skrev två, och de är förmodligen inte hans bästa verk, det är snarare hans 6 + 1 strykkvartetter - men ingen spelar dem i vår tid. Och slutligen skulle jag vilja nämna Helena Mathilda Munktell (1852-1919), som skrev orkesterverk, men ingen symfoni. Men för en kvinna var det redan ovanligt att skriva orkesterverk ock få dem spelad, och hon var den första kvinna i Sverige som skrev en hel opera. Lyssna till exempel på hennes tonedikt "Bränningar".

Vi vänder oss nu till kompositörer vars viktigaste period ligger i det tjugonde århundradet. Och här hittar vi Hugo Alfvén, som lyckades big time med sin Svensk rapsodi nr 1 "Midsommarvaka" från 1903 - i själva verket så mycket att man tenderar att glömma att han också skrev andra verk, inklusive fem symfonier. I Danmark är han bäst känd för att charmera och rymma med målaren Krøyers fru Marie, som blev hans ägen fyrsta fru av tre. Kompositören Tor Aulin hade en syster vid namn Valborg, som blandt annat skrev en stor klaversonat - ock helt ärligt, den er bättra end något som jag har hört fra brorsans penna. Hilding Rosenberg var en kompositör med en lutning mot modernismen, speciellt på 1920-talet - men lyckligtvis snuade han och skrev i en måttligt nyklassisk stil från 1930 och framåt. Allan Pettersson (1911-1980) var ännu en framstående svensk symfonist, men ble från 1960 rörelsehindrad på grund av svår reumatism. Och det är vanskligt inte på høre selvbiografiske træk i hans symfonier, som ble alltmer dystra ock tumultariske och rentav torterade i deras tonspråk. Men svenska staten var nådig och bevilgede ham et livsvarigt stipendium.

Jag vil avslutningsvis nävne Lars-Erik Larsson, som skrev en rigtigt smuk svit kallat "En Vintersaga", men herudover också en serie konserter för ALLA orkesterns instrument (utom slagverket). Så när tubaspelarna vill växla från Vaughan-Wiilliams tubakonsert, som jag nämnde förra dagen, kan de fortsätta till Larssons koncert.

NO: Og vi fortsetter til Noreg, som var i personalunion med Sverige i det mesta av 1800-tallet. Og bekjennelse: Eg kjenner ingen norske barokkkomponister. Og ingen klassiske komponister. Eg kjenner faktisk ikkje noen norske komponister i det hele tatt født før kring 1800. Det var et rikt folkemiljø på lanna, kvar vandrende spelmenn spilte på instrument såsom hardingfelen, som ser ut som en fiolin, men har et sett med resonansstrenger under de normale strengene. Og ofte er instrumentet rikt dekorert. Torgeir Augundsson (1801-1872), bedre kjend som "Myllarguten" (ettersom far hans var møllar) var den best kjende av dessa - og noko av musik hans kan høyres på Youtube - her en brurmarsj (bryllupsmarsj). Ole Bornemann Bull (1810-1880) ble ei profesjonell fiolinist med internasjonal suksess,, men det var Myllarguten som lærte Bull dei første slåttan. Et eneste kort stykke av Bull spilles fremdeles en sjelden gong: "Seterjenta ho søndag".

Norsk musikhistorie begynner ellers med Edvard Grieg (1843-1907), som har blitt kjend over hele verden med verk som klaverkonserten i a-moll, de 66 lyriske stykkene for piano (publicerat i 10 bind) og ei Holbergsuit i gammeldags stil, men spesielt med musikken hans for stykket Per Gynt, varaf komponisten sjölv samlet to suitar for konsertoppføring. I dei andre suit finner man till eksempel "I Dovregubbens hall", som eg til og med har hørt i en rockversjon - men eg husker dessverre ikkje med kven.

Kittelsen (Wikipedia) - trolde (cfr Dovregubben).jpg
Kittelsen (Wikipedia) - trolde (cfr Dovregubben).jpg (45.39 KiB) Viewed 94 times

I et enkelt verk har Grieg skrevet musikk basert på autentiske norske folketoner: i Slåtter si opus 72. Slåttene ble registrert hoss felespiller Knut Dale av en annen norsk komponist Johan Halvorsen, ellers mest kjent for "Bojarernes indtogsmarsj". Men puristene hevder at Halvorsen, som ei romantisk komponist, ikkje noterte akkurat ned det han hørte fra Dale. Ei tredje komponist fra samme periode skal nevnes: Johan Svendsen. Eg refererte ei gong til hans Festpolonaise på HTLAL og ett medlem kommenterte at det var en enorm mengde cymbal i dei stykka. Og det er nok sant.

Dei siste komponist eg vil nevne er Harald Sæverud, som var en modig mann: han skrev sin egen musikk for Per Gynt. Han skrev også en samling "Slåtter og Stev fra Siljustølen" som et slags etterføljer til Grieg si slåtter. Ei enkelt av disse har blitt kjent som "Kjempeviseslåtten" (Canto Rivoltoso) - også i orkesterversjon.

Hardingfele (Wikipedia).jpg
Hardingfele (Wikipedia).jpg (13.95 KiB) Viewed 94 times
3 x


Return to “Language logs”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests