Reineke's SLA Notebook

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reineke
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby reineke » Sat Oct 21, 2017 7:26 pm

Adding Madness to Method
February 6, 2017
https://www.languagemagazine.com/2017/0 ... ss-method/

"VanPatten has some strong opinions about outdated notions of methods, so much so that he entitled a recent Tea with BVP episode “There Is No Such Thing Anymore as Methods.” During that episode (Episode 14—http://mixlr.com/teawithbvp/), BVP frankly shared his views on methods: “I want to usher in a ban on the word methods or methodology on all courses related to language teaching.”

"The most universally accepted principle of SLA is the need for comprehensible input (CI) and the confirmation that without CI, acquisition is not possible."

Regardless of how comprehensible a message may be (or how comprehensible a teacher thinks it is), only a portion of input is generally converted to intake during the early stages of language acquisition. Intake is the portion of the input from which the learner is able to derive meaning, and at best, that may be a vague or ambiguous representation of what was actually communicated.

Thus far, the intake has strictly been focused on deriving meaning, progressing from vague representation to robust and more complete understanding. Comprehension is where language acquisition begins, but what happens after comprehension is achieved is so complex that there is not a scientist on the planet who can figure out exactly what happens during the process."

"Research has revealed that learners have the same built-in mechanisms for acquiring language and that language generally develops in predictable stages. These stages, although predictable, are not neat and tidy, and they sometimes resemble a commute from the suburbs to downtown."

" What makes analyzing language acquisition even more challenging is the evidence that suggests that the process is completely unconscious."

https://www.languagemagazine.com/2017/0 ... ss-method/
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby reineke » Sat Oct 21, 2017 8:17 pm

Vocabulary and dementia in six novelists
Ian Lancashire University of Toronto

"Previous longitudinal studies of modern novelists Iris Murdoch and Agatha Christie indicate that a dramatic loss of vocabulary, and an increase in repeated phrases, mark incipient dementia, especially Alzheimer’s disease. A new case study of detective-ction writer Ross Macdonald (1915–1930, diagnosed with Alzheimer’s), also shows these language impairments. they are absent in late works by children’s writer Enid Blyton (1897–1968), although she had a juvenile vocabulary and was diagnosed with presenile dementia, not Alzheimer’s. All four writers nonetheless mismanage story development and tend to fictionalize autobiography. three ‘healthy’ control writers lacking these markers, Frank Baum (of ‘Oz’ fame), James Hilton (Goodbye, Mr. Chips), and R.A. Freeman (the Dr Thorndyke detective series), show that advanced old age need not end indementia."

Vocabulary and Dementia in Six Novelists (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... _Novelists [accessed Oct 21 2017].
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby reineke » Sat Oct 21, 2017 8:45 pm

DaveBee wrote:
reineke wrote:Books sorted by lexile levels

(HP alternatives)
Shouldn't Enid Blyton be in that list somewhere? I have a hazy memory that she deliberately used a specific limited vocabulary.

---------
I looked up the Hardy Boys author, he was responsible for a bajillion books! I may track down one of the Tom Swift books at some point.


650-700

https://fab.lexile.com/book/details/9781444908657/

What's right about Enid Blyton?

Every teacher will tell you what's wrong with Enid Blyton books, but why are they so popular?

Why have they stood the test of time?

"Why do most children seem to go through a phase where they won't read anything else?"

"I wouldn't 'ban' a child from reading them, but the main objections to Blyton's novels I would assume are their repetitiveness, limited vocabulary and dated social realism."

https://www.librarything.com/topic/4246

What Enid Did
As passwords to the human imagination, adventure and mystery are hard to beat
Sep 3, 1997

"Yet, according to newly qualified teacher, Carolyn Wade, student teachers in Britain are told to "discourage" their pupils from reading Enid Blyton as she "perpetuates gender stereotypes, portrays a middle class landscape with vocabulary that is repetitive and unchallenging."

As a teacher herself Enid Blyton would have been horrified, says Pam Allay, archivist of the Enid Blyton Company: "Enid always considered her work highly educational and moral in tone." Blyton's banishment to the margins of children's literature started as early as 1959, nine years before her death. Not that she took any notice. She knew what children wanted and she gave it to them: adventure with a safety net, held up by a framework of friends and family. And a madcap dog."

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/what ... 3?mode=amp

BBC banned Enid Blyton for 30 years

Enid Blyton, the best-selling children's author, was banned from the BBC for nearly 30 years because executives thought her a "second-rater".

Blyton, the creator of the Famous Five, the Secret Seven and Noddy, was kept off the radio by executives who dismissed her plays and books as lacking "literary value" and being "such very small beer".

The censorship has been revealed in a series of letters and memos released from the BBC archives.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/book ... years.html

"Even now, kids like to go back to the same characters and the same friends in their books and to go off on different adventures. What she was doing was allowing her readers to grow up with her books. It’s not completely dissimilar to what JK Rowling has done with Harry Potter, in allowing her stories to get slightly older as the readership grows up with the characters.”

Hawes and Bonham Carter are equally clear about why Blyton is enjoying a renaissance among young readers. Sales of her books are on the rise and she was named Britain’s best-loved author in a poll last month.

“The things she was criticised for, like simplicity and repetitiveness, that’s the appeal,” says Bonham Carter. “Reading Noddy to my son Billy I see that he loves it because it’s not complicated and it gets to the point. She had an instinct for simple story types. She said children want familiarity, they want reassurance. They want to feel they are safe and they want to know where they are. And I think that’s right. "

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/book ... rself.html
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby Robierre » Sat Oct 21, 2017 9:41 pm

5 prijatelja i Adran Molle...opet bih to citao...kao kad sam imao 12-13 god. :D ( mozda i manje...davno je to bilo)
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby reineke » Sat Oct 21, 2017 9:47 pm

Robierre wrote:5 prijatelja i Adran Molle...opet bih to citao...kao kad sam imao 12-13 god. :D


Eto da se pohvalim: ja sam Blyton prvi put prije nekoliko godina (pro)čitao (proslušao). Sad slušam na ruskom i strašno mi se sviđa ("jezično a i kao priča). Nađi na poljskom pa pokušaj.
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby Robierre » Sat Oct 21, 2017 10:09 pm

reineke wrote:
Eto da se pohvalim: ja sam Blyton prvi put prije nekoliko godina (pro)čitao (proslušao). Sad slušam na ruskom i strašno mi se sviđa ("jezično a i kao priča). Nađi na poljskom pa pokušaj.

Citao sam nedavno da su Francuzi izbacili nove prijevode Le club des cinq u kojima vise nema passé simplea. :mrgreen: Ne znam bas da li sa spreman citati na poljskom, ali na francuskom bih rado procitao nesto iz nostalgije. Sjecam se da mi je najdraza bila jedna epizoda s putujucim cirkusom i da se u svima spominjalo dosta engleske hrane. :)
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby reineke » Sat Oct 21, 2017 10:12 pm

The most translated authors

Statistics on data published until now by the Index
Statistics on whole Index Translationum database

"TOP 50" Author
1 Christie Agatha 7236
2 Verne Jules 4751
3 Shakespeare William 4296
4 Blyton Enid 3924
5 Cartland Barbara 3652
6 Steel Danielle 3628
7 Lenin Vladimir Il'ič 3593
8 Andersen Hans Christian 3520
9 King Stephen 3357
10 Grimm Jacob 2977
11 Grimm Wilhelm 2951
12 Roberts Nora 2597
13 Dumas Alexandre 2540
14 Doyle Arthur Conan 2496
15 Twain Mark 2431
16 Dostoevskij Fedor Mihajlovič 2342
17 Simenon Georges 2315
18 Lindgren Astrid 2271
19 Joannes Paulus II 2258
20 Goscinny René 2234
21 Stine Robert L. 2222
22 London Jack 2182
23 Tolstoj Lev Nikolaevič 2178
24 Asimov Isaac 2159
25 Dickens Charles 2112
26 Stevenson Robert Louis 2041
27 Steiner Rudolf 1869
28 Wilde Oscar 1788
29 Sheldon Sidney 1733
30 Holt Victoria 1660
31 Marx Karl 1645
32 Balzac Honoré de 1590
33 Hemingway Ernest 1570
34 Ludlum Robert 1530
35 Hesse Hermann 1523
36 Kafka Franz 1494
37 Nietzsche Friedrich Wilhelm 1492
38 Koontz Dean R. 1491
39 Rajanīśa 1491
40 Clark Mary Higgins 1485
41 Platon 1481
42 Čehov Anton Pavlovič 1477
43 Tolkien John Ronald Reuel 1459
44 Poe Edgar Allan 1437
45 Kipling Rudyard 1424
46 Perrault Charles 1401
47 Goethe Johann Wolfgang von 1399
48 Dahl Roald 1398
49 García Márquez Gabriel 1396
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby reineke » Sat Oct 21, 2017 10:29 pm

Le Petit Prince, deuxième livre le plus traduit au monde après la Bible

"Le célèbre conte de l'écrivain Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, vient d'être traduit dans une 300e langue : le hassanya. Un dialecte arabe qui l'inspira lors de sa création.

" Le plus beau métier d'homme est le métier d'unir les hommes”, écrivit Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. L'écrivain visionnaire pouvait-il imaginer qu'un jour son livre soit lu sur les cinq continents? Son Petit Prince est devenu roi. Dans un communiqué de la Fondation Saint Exupéry, son chef d'oeuvre est devenu depuis ce mercredi 5 avril, le deuxième livre le plus traduit au monde après la Bible. Ce, grâce à sa 300e traduction en hassanya."

http://www.lefigaro.fr/langue-francaise ... -bible.php

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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby reineke » Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:28 pm

05 April 2007 at 10:45pm
"At 5, I do not feel burdened. I also find that there's plenty of time to use these languages (my laziness is another story). I do feel that seven might be the right number. Maybe I'm mistaken.

I am beginning more and more to lean toward Spanish and Japanese rather than Russian and Portuguese. The first one shouldn't be a problem. The second ahem I'm not sure but it's doable. I'd love to learn Japanese. The question is should I make a "sensible choice" and go for the other two as I could acquire them more easily. I have worked out a few tables covering general usefulness questions and a few personal ones and Japanese comes out on top over both Portuguese and Russian. I do feel that Japanese would put a definite stop on any further expansion."

Hmmm....
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Re: Team Me: Foxing around

Postby reineke » Tue Nov 14, 2017 7:19 pm

1 x 22 minute cartoon episode = 1,500-3,000 words.

Occasionally I need to remind myself that 100 hours of such material is the equivalent of a War and Peace-sized tome (587,287 words).

WWII documentary: 96/96
2017 Ru = 100 hours

"Когда тебе тяжело, ты вспомни про мою судьбу, и тебе будет легче... "

Епистиния Степанова

I ran into this article and I remembered Stepanova's words:

https://atwar.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/01 ... -the-page/
Last edited by reineke on Sun Nov 19, 2017 4:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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