Russian/Bulgarian/Hebrew + EN,FR,IT,DE,RO

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AroAro
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Re: Russian/Bulgarian/Hebrew + EN,FR,IT,DE,RO

Postby AroAro » Wed Nov 02, 2022 8:15 am

Bulgarian – “Bulgarian Textbook for Foreigners Part 1” – lesson 18, “Beginning Bulgarian” – lesson 5

Russian – just wanted to share with you a great playlist of Varlamov’s videos, 30 years after the collapse of USSR he visited all the now-independent Soviet republics, the videos are quite long (2-2.5 hours each) but super interesting and instructive

Hebrew – lesson 29 from Assimil course. I listened a little bit to Hebrew radio, I even recognized some words that I learned via Clozemaster (such as behekhlet – "absolutely", I heard that one a lot). However, I couldn’t guess what they were talking about, so my vocabulary has slowly been expanding but is still too limited at the time “to connect all the dots” and understand a podcast or radio programme.

Clozemaster
#Bulgarian from English (Fluency Fast Track) => playing 5134, mastered 4392 out of 7479 sentences
#Russian from English (>50,000 Most Common Words) => playing 6699, mastered 6207 out of 9985 sentences
#Hebrew from English (Fluency Fast Track) => playing 1309, mastered 677 out of 19999 sentences

Reading – finished “Koirapuisto” (by the way, the book was published in Finnish in 2019 and in Polish translation in 2022, there are however some hints to pandemic and even lockdowns, so that makes me wonder if Sofi Oksanen had been able to predict the Covid or if the Polish translator took too much artistic licence and embellished the story?…), then I made an “Annie Ernaux readathon”. Most of her books are very short but they’re not a quick read – on the contrary, they are rather a slog. First, I read “La Place” et “Une Femme” and didn’t intrigue me in any way. Then, “L’Evénement” was a little bit better but it was still only an account of events that she lived through and well, nothing more. Followed “L’Occupation” which was really puzzling in a negative sense of the word – it read more as an overlong article for a psychology magazine than a real book. And finally her opus magnum “Les Années” – it managed to grab my attention at some sections but overall it left me wondering what’s all the fuss? Ernaux makes reference to too many names and events that are not familiar to anyone outside of France and that’s ok, but there were really too many of them, I stopped checking them on internet at some point because it became irritating. Anyway, I like to pay attention to literary awards for inspiration and scan the lists of longlisted/shortlisted/in-contention books and authors – those are in most cases, at least for me, more interesting than the eventual winners. Next read – Kapka Kassabova’s “To The Lake” (in Polish translation).

I’m finally moving to the house me and my wife bought last year. I have already moved all my books, I was pleased to see that I have actually read most of them. I’m also glad I moved the books by myself, otherwise I would be forced to answer questions such as:

Have you read all those books? (No, sure, I haven’t.)
Why do you have so many books? (Well, because I like reading?)
What are you going to do with those that you’ve already read? (Well, I will keep them, I guess?)
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Caromarlyse
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Re: Russian/Bulgarian/Hebrew + EN,FR,IT,DE,RO

Postby Caromarlyse » Thu Nov 03, 2022 8:33 am

AroAro wrote:Russian – just wanted to share with you a great playlist of Varlamov’s videos, 30 years after the collapse of USSR he visited all the now-independent Soviet republics, the videos are quite long (2-2.5 hours each) but super interesting and instructive


Thanks for the recommendation - I started watching one last night, and, you're right, it's an interesting playlist that has got a lot of watching hours in it!
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AroAro
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Re: Russian/Bulgarian/Hebrew + EN,FR,IT,DE,RO

Postby AroAro » Thu Nov 10, 2022 10:11 am

Bulgarian – “Bulgarian Textbook for Foreigners Part 1” – lesson 24, “Beginning Bulgarian” – lesson 8. I decided to incorporate more listening in my daily schedule. Until now, I’ve been listening to Bulgarian newscasts from time to time but it’s not necessarily the most exciting thing to listen to, so I’ve found some book channels on YT. I have also a list of Bulgarian podcasts but will give them a try later, when my vocabulary becomes richer.

Hebrew – lesson 38 from Assimil course (reviewing). I was listening to Hebrew radio station “Kol Reshet Bet” while ironing – when my wife came into the room, she asked if anything interesting happened in France. I asked her: why in France, they’re talking in Hebrew, and she exclaimed” “oh, I was sure it was French!”. The funny thing is that she had French classes in high school but maybe the fact that both languages are stressed on last syllable confused her ;)

Clozemaster
#Bulgarian from English (Fluency Fast Track) => playing 5454, mastered 4770 out of 7479 sentences
#Russian from English (>50,000 Most Common Words) => playing 7179, mastered 6717 out of 9985 sentences
#Hebrew from English (Fluency Fast Track) => playing 1389, mastered 755 out of 19999 sentences

Reading – finished Kapka Kassabova’s “To The Lake” – interesting, but her “Border” was more compelling (and in the latter she managed better to create a special, even ominous, mood). Started reading a book in Russian “Зулейха открывает глаза” by Guzel Yakhina.
And this weekend, I’m going to Warsaw for a two-day trip. First, I will be seeing a theater piece in Yiddish and on the following day, I’m going to visit “Polin. Museum of the History of Polish Jews”.
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AroAro
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Re: Russian/Bulgarian/Hebrew + EN,FR,IT,DE,RO

Postby AroAro » Thu Nov 17, 2022 9:45 pm

Last weekend I went to Warsaw and on the first day I saw the theater play in Yiddish at the Jewish Theater. The theater is being hosted at a temporary location, and the play was staged in a small room that could accommodate up to 30 people (almost all the places had been sold out). The scene was actually a platform in the middle of the room and the viewers sat on both sides of the platform. It resembled more a fashion show stage, to give you an idea. Anyway, the viewers were very close to the scene and the actors, and I felt a little uneasy at such a proximity. (It reminded me why I usually don't go to theater - watching actors "live" on scene is like infringing their privacy, at least for me, that's why I prefer movies.)

The play I saw was called “Der Szturem.Cwiszyn / דער שטורם. צווישן”, an adaptation of “The Tempest” by Shakespeare. “The Tempest” in Yiddish language was shown for the first time in late 30' in Lodz and Warsaw and garnered very positive reviews from Jewish and Polish critics alike. This modern adaptation takes into consideration what happened during the WW2, and these short glimpses into the tragedy were indeed very emotional. The titular tempest is the Holocaust, and I guess that Miranda and Prospero are the survivors? The Polish subtitles were provided throughout the whole play but the thing is that I don't like Shakespeare and I didn't really understand most of what was going on even with these Polish subtitles, so I stopped checking them at some point and just let myself sink in the rhythm of the language and the general mood. I have never formally learned the language so I wouldn't dare judge the actors' level of fluency but there was one actor (Prospero) who, for my ears, had really mastered the language, he spoke it flawlessly and effortlessly, and I could really hear it whereas the other performers spoke it with a little bit of uneasiness, which is not that surprising - performing in a Foreign Language is not an easy task. Nevertheless, they were all brilliant.

One last thing worth mentioning is about the theater itself. It was established in 1950 and its full name is quite long - Teatr Żydowski im. Estery Rachel i Idy Kamińskich w Warszawie – Centrum Kultury Jidysz. Estera Rachel Kaminska and Ida Kaminska were mother and daughter, the former is called “mother of Yiddish theater” and the latter was the director of the Theater till 1968. Interestingly, Ida Kaminska is the only ever actor from behind the Iron Curtain to get an Oscar nomination in 1965. Of course, most of the plays are now in Polish but the theater seems committed to maintain a small but stable part of its activity in Yiddish. There is also Jewish Cultural Center affiliated to the Theater and they organize, among other things, Yiddish and Hebrew courses online. Yes, that sounds tempting... I'm already thinking about my goals for the next year and I'm considering including Yiddish in one way or the other.

On the following day, I visited “Polin. Museum of the History of Polish Jews”. I chose audio guide in German to practice my listening skills. The girl at the reception was a little bit puzzled but later became amused at the fact that I spoke Polish with her but asked for a German audio guide. They have audio guides in multiple languages, even in lesser known ones such as Belarusian, Hebrew, Hungarian and... yes, Yiddish! It would be nice to come back there upon mastering the language. I already imagine the face the receptionist will make when I casually ask her for a Yiddish audio guide:) The Museum itself is worth visiting, but I was a little deceived that there were not that many original artefacts and most of the exposition is composed of reproductions, photos and so on. Anyway, it traces 1000 years of history of Jewish in Poland in an attractive way, however an audio guide, or joining a group visit, is a must when walking around the exposition, otherwise it would probably be hard to learn something. Many years ago, I visited “Musée d’art et d’histoire du Judaisme” in Paris-Marais and there you can see lots of art works, so I probably expected something similar here, but the two museums have very different scopes and goals as I can see it now. If I ever come back to Paris, I would love to visit it again, along with “Musée de Cluny – Musée National du Moyen Age”, quite underrated places but definitely worth seeing.

One of the galleries at Polin was dedicated to Yiddish and Yivo, here are some photos I took:

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Newspapers in Yiddish (only the covers were reconstructed):

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There was a Jewish opera in Vilnius:

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Singer’s PEN membership card:

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A reconstruction of a warning plate in three languages form WW2:

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I apologize for any errors in my English, I didn’t have time to proof read carefully the text because of my moving to the new house.
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AroAro
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Re: Russian/Bulgarian/Hebrew + EN,FR,IT,DE,RO

Postby AroAro » Sun Nov 20, 2022 8:24 pm

I didn’t have much time for language learning in the last couple of days because of moving to a new location. Even though technically speaking, we moved most of the things, what still remains to be done is the unpacking of boxes and putting the things in the right places, and that’s quite time consuming (and that means less time for language learning). However, I am glad we’ve finally moved, living in a house is a different thing than living in a block of flats.

Bulgarian – “Bulgarian Textbook for Foreigners Part 1” – lesson 30, “Beginning Bulgarian” – lesson 9

Hebrew
– lesson 46 from Assimil course (reviewing)

Clozemaster
– fortunately, I didn’t lose my streak for any of the languages:
#Bulgarian from English (Fluency Fast Track) => playing 5734, mastered 5102 out of 7479 sentences
#Russian from English (>50,000 Most Common Words) => playing 7599, mastered 7172 out of 9985 sentences
#Hebrew from English (Fluency Fast Track) => playing 1488, mastered 847 out of 19999 sentences

Reading
– still reading “Зулейха открывает глаза”, 15% remains to be read. I thought I would like this book more but the last chapters are a slog.
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AroAro
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Re: Russian/Bulgarian/Hebrew + EN,FR,IT,DE,RO

Postby AroAro » Wed Nov 30, 2022 12:25 pm

Bulgarian – “Bulgarian Textbook for Foreigners Part 1” – lesson 36, “Beginning Bulgarian” – lesson 12

Hebrew – finished reviewing Assimil L’Hebreu, then I did the units 11 and 12 from FSI Hebrew Course. Now, I’m going to work on the old Assimil course from 1982 (first volume) by Malca Kenigsberg. It has 63 lessons, so I’ll need about two months to finish it. I should already be familiar with most of the words and grammar structures at this level, that’s why I will treat it more as an opportunity to listen to “comprehensible input” because native materials are still beyond my comprehension.

Clozemaster
#Bulgarian from English (Fluency Fast Track) => playing 6094, mastered 5497 out of 7479 sentences
#Russian from English (>50,000 Most Common Words) => playing 8139, mastered 7766 out of 9985 sentences
#Hebrew from English (Fluency Fast Track) => playing 1568, mastered 941 out of 19999 sentences

Reading – finished reading “Зулейха открывает глаза” (I really wanted to like it more, alas…), I’m now reading Tim Marshall’s “Prisoners of Geography” and “The Power of Geography” (in Polish translation, a nice introduction to geopolitics).
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AroAro
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Re: Russian/Bulgarian/Hebrew + EN,FR,IT,DE,RO

Postby AroAro » Sat Dec 10, 2022 11:28 am

Bulgarian – “Bulgarian Textbook for Foreigners Part 1” – lesson 45 (I’m finally starting to understand how the three verb conjugation groups work in present and aorist, it’s very well explained in this book), “Beginning Bulgarian” – lesson 15.

Hebrew – lesson 17 from Assimil 1983 edition. I love this course, it’s so much better than the current version. Each dialogue, starting from the first lessons, contains about 12 phrases, and these are the dialogues that I can imagine hearing and using in real life. In the current version of the course, the first 20 lessons have ridiculously short dialogues, and they seem to me “detached” from real life situations, trying too hard to be funny or absurd. The recordings for the old course are very well executed, interestingly all the actors still pronounce clearly their “ה‎”, which is barely pronounced these days.

Clozemaster
#Bulgarian from English (Fluency Fast Track) => playing 6534, mastered 5980 out of 7479 sentences
#Russian from English (>50,000 Most Common Words) => playing 8807, mastered 8469 out of 9985 sentences
#Hebrew from English (Fluency Fast Track) => playing 1678, mastered 1067 out of 19999 sentences

Reading – finished reading the two books by Tim Marshall. Next reads => two books in English. I found a little bit of time to arrange my bookshelves and my book collection in general after moving to the new house. All the books that I’ve read so far have gone to the attic because I never reread my books (even though I’m tempted to do so in case of some books, especially those that I read in English or French when my level in both languages was still not that good and reading them felt like a chore but with so many books that I want to read…). Anyway, I think I mentioned that I was surprised to discover that I had already read most of the paper books I own – which doesn’t mean there’s nothing left to be read... so I will try to clear the pile by reading the books that have been waiting way too long for their turn. First one – “True History of the Kelly Gang” by Peter Carey that I must have bought some 15 years ago when I visited my sister who lived then in Hertfordshire. There is still the iconic label “3 for 2 at Waterstone’s. Offer applies to stickered items only” on the cover. I’ve just googled it and it seems Waterstone’s ended this promotion in 2011.

I would also like to write a little why I didn’t like that book in Russian “Зулейха открывает глаза”. It was about a Tatar woman deported to Siberia in early 30’. In the beginning it was quite intriguing but as the story went on, it sadly lost the impetus, as if the writer didn’t know herself where the story should be headed. Plus the fact that Zuleykla becomes a hunter in the tayga (I mean, seriously?), whereas back in Tatarstan she was afraid to leave her home and go into the woods - in general it was not that much convincing. Oh, and the boat that transported the deportees on the Angara river drowned but, miraculously, Zuleykha and ALL the supporting characters that we’d met so far (!), survived. As I said, not a convincing turning point. From the language perspective – not overly difficult, spiced with random Tatar words here and there.
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AroAro
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Re: Russian/Bulgarian/Hebrew + EN,FR,IT,DE,RO

Postby AroAro » Tue Dec 20, 2022 12:45 pm

Bulgarian – I finished the two textbooks I’ve been working on: “Bulgarian Textbook for Foreigners Part 1” (this one is an excellent resource) and “Beginning Bulgarian” (that one is more of an overview of the language for those who already have some basics, would be really hard to use it as a primary rerource). I will now read a Bulgarian grammar by Veneze Popova (in Polish). There are no exercises so that should be a quick read.

Hebrew – – lesson 27 from Assimil 1983 edition

Clozemaster
#Bulgarian from English (Fluency Fast Track) => playing 6914, mastered 6428 out of 7479 sentences
#Russian from English (>50,000 Most Common Words) => playing 9377, mastered 9080 out of 9985 sentences
#Hebrew from English (Fluency Fast Track) => playing 1775, mastered 1172 out of 19999 sentences

Reading – finished “True History of the Kelly Gang”. I have mixed feelings about this book. First of all, I don’t understand at all why the author decided not to use commas. Almost not a single comma in the whole book. As a result, it was quite hard to get into the book and its style, then I got used to it but it was a rather tiring experience. On the other hand, there were some excerpts that really got me hooked and I didn’t mind missing commas. But all in all, the events described in the book simply blended into one never-ending story because they were so similar to each other, so if I were put to a test about this book, I would fail miserably. Next read – “My Sister, My Love” by Joyce Carol Oates. It’s a voluminous book and it occupies a lot of space on my shelf, so I want to read it and move it to the attic.
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AroAro
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Re: Russian/Bulgarian/Hebrew + EN,FR,IT,DE,RO

Postby AroAro » Fri Dec 30, 2022 7:22 am

My progress has slowed down in the last couple of days because of Christmas but also because of my work (a lot of things going on in accounting departments at the end of the year). I will share my review of 2022 and the goals for 2023 next week.

Bulgarian – finished the Bulgarian grammar book in Polish. One big takeaway – a very good explanation of renarrative mood. Now, I’m going to work with “Bulgarian Textbook for Foreigners Part 2”. There are 30 lessons so I need about 1 month to complete it.

Hebrew – I felt an inexplicable urge to write something in Hebrew. I know that there are grammar and spelling errors in my text, and I should probably use fancier words and grammar constructions but anyway here we go:

בשנה הזות, אני התחלתי שוב ללמוד עברית. בפעם הזות, אני מספק מרוצה משאני עשיתי אפילו אם זה קשה לי ללמוד את השפה הזות כי היא שפה שונה מהכל שפות שאני כבר נסיתי ללמוד. אבל עכשיו, נדמה לי שאני אהבתי את המשימה ואני מתקדם לעט - וזה משהו מצוין. למשל, לפני כמה ימים, אני קראתי מאמר קצר בעברית על האוכל שאנחנו צריכים לאכול בחורף. כמובן, אני לא הבנתי את הכל אבל אני הצלחתי להבין קצת, או אולי אפילו יותר! אני יודע שיש אנשים שיכולים ללמוד כל שפה מהר מאוד אבל בשבילי זה לא אותו דבר. אני לא כואס שאני אוד לא יכול לקרוא או לשמוע בעברית בקלות )ואני צריך הרבה זמן כדי לעשות זות(. אז, באוד כמה חודשים אני אפסק ללמוד עברית כדי לעשות מקום לשפות אחרות, אבל זה לא יהיה סוף של הנסיע שלי באולם של עברית. אין בעיה כי מאה אחוז אני אחזור לעברית באוד כמה זמן. אני מקוה שאני יכול להבין יותר עם כל שנה שאני אלמד עברית, אפילו אם זה צריך לקחת הרבה זמן וכוח. ואוד דבר אחת - יש לי פשוט הרבה סבלנות כל זמן שאני לומד שפות.


Clozemaster

#Bulgarian from English (Fluency Fast Track) => playing 7174, mastered 6729 out of 7479 sentences
#Russian from English (>50,000 Most Common Words) => playing 9767, mastered 9495 out of 9985 sentences
#Hebrew from English (Fluency Fast Track) => playing 1825, mastered 1266 out of 19999 sentences

Reading – finished “My Sister, My Love” just yesterday. I have a soft spot for Joyce Carol Oates because she is one of the first writers whose books I started reading in original. I just think that she is too prolific a writer to guarantee a high and stable quality of her output. For every great book she publishes at least 2-3 not so good ones. I’m afraid that “My Sister, My Love” falls at the end of the day in the latter category. It’s not outright bad but nothing memorable either. Next read – Zeruya Shalev’s “Love Life” in Polish translation (of course because my Hebrew is way below the level comfortable enough to read books in original).
Last edited by AroAro on Sun Jan 29, 2023 8:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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cjareck
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Re: Russian/Bulgarian/Hebrew + EN,FR,IT,DE,RO

Postby cjareck » Fri Dec 30, 2022 11:31 am

AroAro wrote:בשנה הזות, אני התחלתי שוב ללמוד עברית. בפעם הזות, אני מספק מרוצה משאני עשיתי אפילו אם זה קשה לי ללמוד את השפה הזות כי היא שפה שונה מהכל שפות שאני כבר נסיתי ללמוד. אבל עכשיו, נדמה לי שאני אהבתי את המשימה ואני מתקדם לעט - וזה משהו מצוין. למשל, לפני כמה ימים, אני קראתי מאמר קצר בעברית על האוכל שאנחנו צריכים לאכול בחורף. כמובן, אני לא הבנתי את הכל אבל אני הצלחתי להבין קצת, או אולי אפילו יותר! אני יודע שיש אנשים שיכולים ללמוד כל שפה מהר מאוד אבל בשבילי זה לא אותו דבר. אני לא כואס שאני אוד לא יכול לקרוא או לשמוע בעברית בקלות )ואני צריך הרבה זמן כדי לעשות זות(. אז, באוד כמה חודשים אני אפסק ללמוד עברית כדי לעשות מקום לשפות אחרות, אבל זה לא יהיה סוף של הנסיע שלי באולם של עברית. אין בעיה כי מאה אחוז אני אחזור לעברית באוד כמה זמן. אני מקוה שאני יכול להבין יותר עם כל שנה שאני אלמד עברית, אפילו אם זה צריך לקחת הרבה זמן וכוח. ואוד דבר אחת - יש לי פשוט הרבה סבלנות כל זמן שאני לומד שפות.

סבלנות היא דבר חשובה מאוד! אני הבנתי מה שכתבת :D . אני החלטתי שעברית שלי מספיק טובה להיות כלי בעבודה שלי. אני מקווה לקרוא ספר בשפה בשנה הבאה אבל אני אלמד ערבית יותר הרבה מעברית
2 x
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