Jammon Log (Bangla, Spanish, Ancient Greek . . . who knows?)

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jammon39
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Jammon Log (Bangla, Spanish, Ancient Greek . . . who knows?)

Postby jammon39 » Thu Sep 16, 2021 11:46 am

I'm looking forward to logging work on projects and experiments here. I have a big exam next week, and have big plans for what I will do after studying for it is over. I am also returning to the US where my in-laws speak Spanish.
Right now my wife and I are watching LOST en Espanol or DESAPARECIDOS together, and I am watching BREAKING BAD in Spanish here and there as well. I am really looking forward to an experiment in Koine Greek as well. But my main focus is Bangla. That's the one language I really want to get good in.

Projects I have going on right now:

Read 35 Bangla Books/Novels (9 read)
Watch 200 hours of Spanish TV. (15 hours)

Upcoming projects:
50 dictation exercises in Bangla.
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Re: Jammon Log (Bangla, Spanish, Ancient Greek . . . who knows?)

Postby Querneus » Sat Sep 18, 2021 11:18 am

I'm just curious: how have you found your (probably long) experience studying Bangla? In terms of resources in particular, or lack thereof. Did you have a leg-up as a heritage speaker?
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Re: Jammon Log (Bangla, Spanish, Ancient Greek . . . who knows?)

Postby jammon39 » Sat Sep 18, 2021 2:21 pm

Querneus wrote:I'm just curious: how have you found your (probably long) experience studying Bangla? In terms of resources in particular, or lack thereof. Did you have a leg-up as a heritage speaker?


I am not a heritage speaker, but spent the last two years in Bangladesh as a part-time to full-time language learner. It has been difficult, but I'm finally at the point where I can read novels and understand TV and I am enjoying learning more than ever. I didn't really know how to learn a language when I started.
I did GPA, though got hung up by taking formal classes for 6-9 months which was not a good use of time. COVID was also an obstacle. I'm halfway through Phase 5.
Resources are very limited. Shockingly so, considering how many people speak the language. I'm brushing up my Spanish, and I am very jealous of how many Spanish resources there are. I made a post in the Programs and Resources section on how I learned and a lot of the resources I used:
https://forum.language-learners.org/vie ... 19&t=17243
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Re: Jammon Log (Bangla, Spanish, Ancient Greek . . . who knows?)

Postby jammon39 » Mon Sep 20, 2021 5:58 am

Bangladeshi Folk Story Translation: The Law's Ruling

Taher Shikdar was a high-status man in the village. He was the village elder, and he had a lot of land.

Taher Shikdar owned all the land on all four sides of his house--some of it was his from inheritance and some of it he had purchased. He owned all the land in the area except for one piece. That one piece of land was owned by Goni Shekh. If Shikdar would be able to buy that piece of land, all the land from his house until the road would be his. Goni Shekh was a well known person in the village. He lived with his wife and three small children. They spent their days together as a happy family.

Shikdar had tried to buy the land from Goni Shekh many times. He had offered twice what the land was worth. But Goni Shekh had said, "This was my great grandfather's ancestral land. He farmed it, and today I am farming it. After me, my son will farm this land. I cannot sell this land, no matter how much profit I would get." Shikdar could not get him to agree to sell the land at any price.

But Taher Shikdar was not the kind of man to give up. He searched for an opportunity to get that land into his hand. He gave the tax collector a bribe so that the land would be seized for taxes, but nothing came of it because Goni Shekh paid his taxes and fees regularly every single year.

When he wasn't able to acquire the land, Taher Shikdar promised inside himself--Goni Shek must suffer.

The thought occurred to Taher Shikdar that he would wrap Goni Shekh up in a legal case. He bribed an investigator to make it possible. But it became difficult--Goni Shekh was well liked and well known in the village. No one believed that Goni Shekh would be involved in any kind of robbery or misdealing. Everyone thought that Shikdar was lying about Goni Shekh out of jealousy and involving him in a false case. Instead of gaining anything, Shikdar's notoriety increased.

One night Taher Shikdar lay awake thinking. He couldn't have peace because until he was able to seize Goni Shekh's land. What could he do!

One day Taher Shikdar was walking past Goni Shekh's house. Suddenly, he heard Goni Shekh and his wife quarreling. Of course farmer's and their wives quarrelling is no new thing. Everyone quarrel's with their wife from time to time. Some beat their wives too. But after the quarrel is over everything is fine and goes back to the way it was.

Taher Shikdar waited there silently for a long time when he heard their quarrel. Then he turned things over in his mind and thought. Then he started walking again and went straight to Kalu Kha's house.

Kalu Kha's house was not far from Goni Shekh's house. Kalu Kha and Goni Shekh had been arguing over a small matter for a few days. Taher Shikdar knew this well. Taher Shikdar consulted with him for some time. Then he took the road back to his house and came to Kashed Ali and Rashid Ali's house. Kashem Ali and Rashid Ali were Taher Shikdar's right hand and left hand men. They did all kinds of Mr. Shikdar's dirty work. Beatings, giving false testimony, everything up to murder. Taher Shikdar told them to keep everything secret but that he had work for them. Moreover, he told them that if they implemented his plans he would reward them with a lot of money.

One or two days later there was a village business meeting at Kalu Kha's house. This was a legal court meeting as well. A court of religious law. Mr. Moulobhi was the judge. One by one, the entire village came to the meeting. Goni Shek learned that he had to appear at the meeting because he was one court's of the accused.

The meeting's business started. Mr. Moulobhi asked, "Tell me, all of you, what is your complaint? What do you want judgment on?"

Kalu Kha rose and said, "Your Honor, Goni Shekh of our village was quarrelling with his wife, and he verbally gave her a legally binding divorce. We want you to make an official ruling from the holy law."

Goni Shekh's mouth dropped open when he heard what Kalu Kha said. He had no idea what the subject of the meeting would be; he only came because he was called. He did not know or understand that the subject of the meeting was a ruling against him. After composing himself, he informed everyone, "No, your honor, I never said anything like this."

Mr. Moulobhi asked him, "Okay, but you did have a quarrel, that part is true?"

Goni Shekh answered, "Yes, your honor, that part is true." Mr. Moulobhi said, "When people quarrel, their heads are not right. So you are not able to recall what you said properly. Please stay silent. We will hear the witness's testimony."

He said to Kalu Kha, " In order for a judgment from the Holy Law, you need three witnesses. You are the one who made the comlaint, is there anyone else who heard this?"

Suddenly, Kashem Ali and Rashid Ali stood up and said, "We also heard this, we were traveling by Goni Shekh's house when it happened."

Mr. Moulobhi asked again, "How many times did Goni Shek tell his wife that he was officially divorcing her?" The three witness said in unison, "Not less than three times, your honor."

Mr. Moulobhi thought for a long time. He turned the pages of the Hadith this way and that. Then in a deep voice he gave judgment, "Today, as of this moment, Goni Shek and his wife are divorced!"

Goni Shek cried out when he heard Mr. Moulobhi's judgment, "No, no, all this is a lie! It's all lies!"

Mr. Moulobhi said, "The judgment and testimony of the Holy Law is the greatest ruling. Once the witnesses have spoken, what else can be done?" He went on to say, "Every Muslim must follow the judgment of the Holy Law. If any Muslim does not obey the judgment of the Holy Law then he will suffer in Hellfire."

No one wanted to say anything about Goni Shek's situation; to say something in the fear of Hellfire is not easy. But one person spoke up, "Your honor, does that mean Goni Shek and his wife cannot live together anymore?"

Mr. Moulobhi thought again for a little while. Then he said, "Yes it is possible. But first his wife has to marry another man. Then after she divorces him, she would be able to marry Goni Shekh again, but not before."

The meeting ended. Everyone returned to their homes.

Taher Shikdar was not present at the meeting that day. He had been outside the village, taking care of some urgent business. But on the occasion that he heard of the ruling, he paid all of Mr. Moulobhi's salary and living expenses himself.

When Goni Shekh's wife Nasima heard everything from his own mouth she began to weep greatly. She couldn't accept that she would have to marry someone else. Goni Shekh wanted to explain it to her, what they had to do, the judgement of the Holy Law, and that they would go to Hellfire if they didn't obey it.

But Goni Shekh's wife could not obey the judgment of the Holy Law. She said from her heart, "This is sin! A huge sin!" After a full day had gone by, Goni Shek's wife climbed the Mango tree beside their house and hung herself by the throat, his beloved Nasima!



NOTE: This story will be on the literature part of my exam tomorrow.
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Re: Jammon Log (Bangla, Spanish, Ancient Greek . . . who knows?)

Postby jammon39 » Mon Sep 20, 2021 7:17 am

Bangladeshi Folk Story Translation: Test of Faith
(Note: As far as I know this is not from any religious text. It's certainly not from the Quran, the main Hadith, or Bible. However, certain Jewish folk stories and Talmud stories have made their way into Islamic culture, and this seems like it may be one of them.)

There were three descendants of the Children of Israel. One of them suffered from leprosy. He whole body was covered in sores and puss and fluid was coming out of these sores constantly.

Another of them was a bald man. He didn't have a single hair on his head; he had no beard; he didn't even have eyelashes or eyebrows. So everyone made fun of him. Whenever he went out on the street, the children teased him. Some people would slap him.

There was another in a house close by who was blind. He had to hear that the world was beautiful from others. He could not enjoy the world's beauty with his own eyes. So, depressed, he would stay sitting in one corner of the house.

God sent an angel from heaven to test their faith. The angel took on the guise of saint (or traveling holy man) and visited the leper first. He said, "I see wounds all over your body. Flies are buzzing from every direction. Certainly you must be suffering a lot."

The man answered, "What more sad thing can I add? I am suffering Hell from being alive on earth, but my suffering is not as bad as Hell."

The saint asked him, "Okay, what would make you happy if you got it? Money, wealth, or something else?"

The man said, "What would I do with the world's wealth, tell me?"

The saint said, "I understand your thinking. You want beautiful body color, and beautiful skin. Isn't that so?"

The man answered happily, "You are right. What more could I want?"

The saint said, "Okay, so be it." Saying this, he passed his hand over the man's whole body. Then all the man's sores all over his body dried up and his face became that of a handsome man.

The saint gave him a good dairy camel and said, "Take care of this camel well. It will have more calves. This way, your days will go well." After he said this, he went on his way.

Then the saint appeared near the bald man and said, "Not having any hair or beard, you must be feeling bad, suffering a lot. Isn't that so?"

The man replied, "You don't have to say more. Without a single hair on the head or a single hair on the face, you can't show me anyone uglier. I feel ashamed to go out on the street. People laugh when they see me."

The saint, coming closer, said, " Okay brother, you don't have to be sad anymore. I am taking your sadness far from you." As he said this, the saint placed his hand on the man's head and slowly beautiful black hair sprouted on the man's head.

Seeing this, the man was overcome with happiness.

The saint asked him, "Do you want anything more?"

The man replied, "A cow."

The saint gave him a pregnant cow and left that place.

The blind man was sitting under a tree along the side of the road begging. It was evening. Three or four travelers gave him a total of ten taka. At that time the saint came in front of him and asked, "Hey there, does your begging fill your stomach?"

The man answered, "Some days it does. Then again, some days it doesn't. What more or what else can I do, tell me? I have hands and feet and the ability to work, but I have eyes that don't see. I don't have the ability to go anywhere. So how can I earn money?"

The saint said, "If your sight was returned, then would you be happy?"

The man answered, "How will such good luck happen to me, sir?"

The saint put his hand on the man's two eyes and slowly, slowly, his eyes became better.

Then the saint asked him, "Tell me, what is your favorite?"

"A goat," the man answered.

The saint gave him a goat and left.

A long time later . . .

God sent that angel to that country again in the guise of an ordinary traveler. First he went and saw the leper's house. His house had many camels and other livestock. Now he was a remarkably rich man in that society.

The traveler said to him, "I am an ordinary traveler. I have no money because I am returning from a far country. Please in God's mercy, you are a rich man now. You are no longer a leper. Please help me with some money."

The man said, "What is all this crazy talk you are saying? Why would I be a leper? And you're talking about money? All of this I got from inheritance."

The traveler said, "God sees everything, and he sees that you are not the least bit grateful. Your whole body had sores. Buzzing flies surrounded you. May God's curse fall on you, may sickness fall on you. For the rest of your life you will live like before, as a leper."

Then the traveler went to the bald man and said, "Grandfather, I became poor traveling from country to country. I don't have any more money with me. Please help me with some money."

The man had forgotten his previous condition. At this time, he had even forgotten God. He sent the traveler away from his house in irritation. As the traveler was leaving he said to himself, "Ungrateful man, may God's curse fall on you."

Then the traveler went to the blind man's house. The blind man was now a very happy man. Now he lacked nothing.

The traveler said to him, "I am so tired from traveling so long. I haven't eaten anything in two days. I don't have any money with me. Please bless me with somewhere to stay and something to eat."

When the man heard this sad story, he felt compassion. He gave him a place to stay in his house, and cared for him affectionately.

Then the traveler said to him, "Please help me by giving me a goat."

The man hearing this said, "Look, anything you need, you can take with you when you go. Please know, I was once a blind man. By God's grace I received my sight. Everything that you see that I have, is a gift from God."

When the traveler heard this, he was happy, and taking the form of the saint he said, "I am the angel! God sent me to this country in the guise of a saint to do good for three people. You have pleased God. In order to test your faith, I returned in the form of a traveler. The sad thing is that the other two are ungrateful, unclean, liars. They do not have faith in God. They have forgotten God's blessing. God was unhappy with them and he snatched all their happiness, peace, and wealth away. But you are truly God's servant. You have faith in God. You did not forget his limitless blessings. God will give you even more happiness and wealth. Saying this, the angel disappeared. The man seeing and understanding everything said, "Oh God, bless your servant. May all your servants have faith so that they live forever."

Note: This folk story is part of the literature section of the exam I am taking tomorrow.
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Re: Jammon Log (Bangla, Spanish, Ancient Greek . . . who knows?)

Postby jammon39 » Mon Sep 20, 2021 11:49 am

Bangladeshi Folk Tale Translation: The Glory of Namaz (Islamic ritual prayer)

Once there was a farmer's son who did no work. He ate at his father's restaurant and spent all day traveling around. His old father and mother told him everyday, "If you don't learn to work, how will you eat? Moreover, you don't have an older brother to take charge of things and take care of you. We are worried about you."

One day he thought to himself, "Mother and father are right. I am grown up now. Now, I should do something. One day he truly, truly tried to find some work. But trying very hard, and traveling to many places, he just ended up frustrated. He had not learned to farm or take care of land. He had grown up but still depended on his parents. What could he do now?

He thought this way for a while, but suddenly one day an idea came into his mind. He determined to go to the village elder's house that night and rob him. He knew there was a lot of money and cash in the house. He could become a rich man overnight.

He put this thought into action. The farmer's son took a boring-tool in hand and quietly went and waited behind the village elder's house. As he stood there, he overheard the village elder and his wife talking.

The village elder's wife said, "How much longer will our daughter stay in our house? She is grown up now. We need to give her in marriage. After searching, a suitable looking man has not appeared."

The village elder said, "After searching so much, I am fed up. I have traveled all over the region searching. If I find a good house then the man is not good. If I find a good man, then the house is not good. So it's over, from now on I am done searching. I am going to let God take the burden and sit in the house quietly. I will see if someone comes along for my daughter or not."

The housewife laughed when she heard this. She said, "What suitor will come with you sitting quietly in the house? Do what you know to do."

The village elder said, "I am determined to give my daughter to whatever boy prays namaz everyday. If he has anything else I will not judge or count. From tomorrow I will watch; after the call to prayer I will see which boys come to the mosque to pray and after prayer I will watch for who is coming home from the mosque. After three months I will see who keeps the habit of prayer and who doesn't. If there's a boy can keep doing it daily, then good. I will give him all the inheritance, cash and everything."

The farmer's son was standing there all this time and heard everything. His face lit up with new hope. He thought, only three months of going to the mosque and returning to his house after prayer was not very hard work. He would be foolish to lose such an opportunity.

The next day at the morning prayer he was there before everyone else. After the prayer ended he stayed at the mosque to worship God. Only after a long time after everyone else left did he return to his house. He was trying to become the village elder's son-in-law.

Day after day went by. The farmer's son arrived at the mosque before everyone else and he was the last to return home. Month by month went by and slowly the end of the third month arrived. He had not stopped trying. Now he spent almost all day and night at the mosque.

The village elder became very happy with the farmer's son. At the friday prayer assembly the village elder gave the farmer's son an invitation to his house. The time came for the farmer's son to appear. After the meal the conversation went this way and that way until they arrived at the actual purpose of the meeting. The village elder said, "We have wanted to give our daughter into the hands of a genuine man of prayer for many days. For these last three months I have noticed that you went to the mosque before everyone else and you left after everyone else. You are a prudent young man, and there is no one else like you in the region. Please accept our daughter. What wealth I have, I am willing to give all of it to you. You won't have to do anything else and all your needs will be met, you will never have to worry about them again."

The village elder was thinking that at this offer the farmer's son would be jumping for joy, but hearing the boy's answer the village elder's hopes fell.

The farmer's son politely said, "Look, I am an idle boy. That you you desire me, an incompetent boy, to be your son-in-law I am unendingly thankful. If I agreed to your proposal maybe I would be able to live a happy life. But please forgive me. I am immersed in my pursuit of God. I don't want this world's gifts or money. But I will try to look for a suitable fiance for your daughter. Please bless me sir."

Note: This folk story will be on the literature section of my exam tomorrow.
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Re: Jammon Log (Bangla, Spanish, Ancient Greek . . . who knows?)

Postby jammon39 » Tue Sep 21, 2021 8:50 am

Exam is over. I will take the final portion in a few months schedule permitting, that will be advanced dictation and composition.

Going to take a break, and maybe binge watch some TV in Spanish.
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Re: Jammon Log (Bangla, Spanish, Ancient Greek . . . who knows?)

Postby jammon39 » Fri Sep 24, 2021 7:40 am

Finished!
This is the first of a two volume collection of Satyajit Ray's famous detective Feluda, his teenage cousin Topshe, and tag-a-along pulp writer Lalmohan Babu. These are great for language learning because they were written for teenagers, feature the same characters in similar situations over and over, and have high quality public radio audiobook versions available. This first collection features 18 of the 35 total Feluda novels and novellas. Because of length, I only counted this as 8 full novels, even though it features 11 full novels and 7 novellas/stories. I plan to continue the series and start on volume two soon.

IMG_0838.jpg
IMG_0838.jpg (380.82 KiB) Viewed 806 times
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Re: Jammon Log (Bangla, Spanish, Ancient Greek . . . who knows?)

Postby Sonjaconjota » Fri Sep 24, 2021 8:20 am

jammon39 wrote: This is the first of a two volume collection of Satyajit Ray's famous detective Feluda, his teenage cousin Topshe

I don't study Bangla, but this sounds really cool.
This forum is starting to become rather dangerous, because I see so many references to books that seem interesting. I don't need any new books! :D
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Re: Jammon Log (Bangla, Spanish, Ancient Greek . . . who knows?)

Postby jammon39 » Sun Sep 26, 2021 10:21 am

Started my Koine Greek project today.

1. Learn the alphabet and skim the two grammar's I own: COMPLETE NEW TESTAMENT GREEK (Teach Yourself) by Betts and LEARN NEW TESTAMENT GREEK by Dobson. I already own these and don't want to spend any more money until I have a significant time investment and know I will use the resources.

2. Focus on 1 John, Mark and/or John, 1 verse or chunk at a time, listening and reading repetitively while checking an interlinear but not relying on it too much. The goal will be to get away from the interlinear and into a reader's edition (got the app) ASAP.

3. After working through those texts re-evaluate. If I am bored or struggling with the ambiguity, I will go back to the grammars. If I am enjoying the process and can notice significant progress I will keep chunking up to 300 hours.

4. I will keep revisiting the grammars every once in a while until I'm at a point where I am comfortable working through the exercises in them. (Though I will avoid translation exercises for now).

5. I will count my hours until I reach 500.

RESOURCES:

Complete New Testament Greek by Betts
Learn New Testament Greek by Dobson
The Interlinear Greek New Testament by George Ricker Berry (I may peruse some other interlinears as well)
Greek New Testament Readhttps://images-na.ssl-images-amazon ... 200_.jpger App
Daily Dose of Greek (I may edit these videos to just include the reading along with the text, since they are already in chunks, and the video keeps track of when each word is said.)
Audio and Video of Greek New Testament being read aloud with the text. (Youtube has various options)
Ankhi and Premade Decks (I only plan to use this on the back end of the experiment)

I will buy a hardcopy of the NA or UBS and/or a reader's edition once I have a big enough time commitment into the project.


Today I watched some Koine Greek alphabet videos, skimmed through COMPLETE NEW TESTAMENT GREEK Image
and watched this video
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