Italian study group

An area with study groups for various languages. Group members help each other, share resources and experience. Study groups are permanent but the members rotate and change.
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OCCASVS
Posts: 8
Joined: Thu Nov 26, 2015 10:18 pm
Languages: Italian (N), English, Polish (B2/C1), French (B2), Chinese (A2/B1), Japanese (A1)
Studying: Polish, Chinese, Japanese
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Re: Italian study group

Postby OCCASVS » Sat Dec 31, 2016 2:46 pm

sillygoose1 wrote:Does anyone know of any movies that is all/majority in dialect? I found one in Abruzzese awhile back but I totally forgot the name.

I'd love to know of any in Roman or Tuscan if possible, but others like Molisano, Pugliese, Calabrese, etc would be awesome too.

Baaria is in pure Sicilian, a great film by the way, it feel very authentic. It shows XX century Sicilia in an interesting way.
LaCapaGira is in Bari dialect of the Southern Italian continuum. A criminal story set in Bari. I don't think many people outside our homeland watched it, but it's linguistically very interesting and accurate.
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Spoonary
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Español (Advanced), Italiano (Intermediate), Esperanto (I try), Deutsch (Beginner)
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Re: Italian study group

Postby Spoonary » Sat Dec 31, 2016 8:40 pm

In the new year, I would like to buy an Italian grammar book, but I'm not sure which to buy.

So far I'm thinking about going for Routledge's Reference Grammar of Modern Italian, but if anyone has any other recommendations I would love to hear them.

Yes, these are the things I think about on New Years Eve night... :?
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Haiku D'etat
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Languages: British English (N); Italian (B1)
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Re: Italian study group

Postby Haiku D'etat » Wed Jan 25, 2017 9:48 pm

I found a frequency list of academic Italian words and collocations, if this might be useful - http://elearning.unistrapg.it/corpora/aic.html
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AK47
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Location: NY
Languages: English (N) , Russian (N), Spanish (B2), Italian (Beginner)
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Re: Italian study group

Postby AK47 » Sun Feb 26, 2017 7:45 pm

Can anyone recommend some good Italian tv shows WITH Italian subtitles? Crime, mystery, thriller, comedy.

It seems everything on raiplay.it either doesn't have subtitles or isn't available outside of Italy.

Thanks.
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SC: ES : 48 / 100 Books SC: IT : 7 / 100 Books
SC: ES : 38 / 100 Films SC: IT : 16 / 100 Films

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reineke
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Re: Italian study group

Postby reineke » Mon Feb 27, 2017 3:46 pm

Spoonary wrote:In the new year, I would like to buy an Italian grammar book, but I'm not sure which to buy.

So far I'm thinking about going for Routledge's Reference Grammar of Modern Italian, but if anyone has any other recommendations I would love to hear them.

Yes, these are the things I think about on New Years Eve night... :?


A lightweight grammar for foreigners would be Susanna Nocchi's Grammatica Pratica Della Lingua Italiana: Nuova Grammatica Pratica Della Lingua Italiana. A1-B1.

Advanced grammars:

Dardaro Trifone. Grammatica italiana. Con nozioni di linguistica. 824 p. The grammar is in the required/recommended literature lists at several universities.

Giampaolo Salvi, Laura Vanelli: Nuova grammatica italiana 365 p.

I've read good things about this grammar. It seems like an approachable reference work:

"Un tentativo di presentare le strutture morfologiche e sintattiche nella prospettiva della linguistica scientifica moderna. Scopo di questa grammatica, oltre a quello descrittivo, è di fare da ponte tra la visione scientifica dei fatti linguistici e l'insegnamento nell'università e nella scuola. Pur utilizzando come principi teorici quelli correnti nella linguistica moderna, questo studio non ne presuppone la conoscenza: i concetti analizzati, in particolare quelli che si staccano dalla prassi tradizionale dell'insegnamento grammaticale italiano, sono infatti definiti e spiegati accuratamente."

G. Patota: Grammatica di riferimento dell'italiano contemporaneo. Sounds good:

Editore: Garzanti Linguistica
Anno edizione: 2006
Pagine: 528 p.

"La "Grammatica di riferimento dell'italiano contemporaneo" si presenta come una sintesi dei risultati più avanzati ottenuti dalla ricerca linguistica italiana nel campo della produzione di grammatiche scientifiche, di grammatiche scolastiche e di grammatiche per stranieri: intende descrivere le strutture grammaticali e sintattiche dell'italiano attuale in modo completo e scientificamente rigoroso, e al tempo stesso chiaro e accessibile a tutti. Le nozioni teoriche sono ridotte al minimo indispensabile e i termini tecnici sono quasi del tutto abbandonati; delle partizioni tradizionali si conservano solo quelle realmente utili nella pratica dell'italiano parlato e scritto. In fondo all'opera, un capitolo che raccoglie 80 schede di sintassi recupera, per il lettore meno aperto alle novità, le nozioni tradizionali di sintassi della frase e del periodo (soggetto, predicato, complemento, proposizione principale, tipi di proposizioni subordinate ecc.), mentre un ricco e particolareggiato indice analitico consente di individuare tutti gli argomenti trattati. Infine, un capitolo illustra come si costruiscono oltre 1 600 verbi italiani, da abbandonare a zoppicare. Consultando la lista delle reggenze il lettore assume che si può "adempiere il proprio dovere" ma anche "adempiere al proprio dovere"; che è possibile "allearsi a qualcuno" ma anche "allearsi con qualcuno"; che una certa pratica può "afferire all'ufficio reclami" mentre non può "afferire l'ufficio reclami", e così via."

Luca Serianni: Grammatica italiana 768 pages
Described as "grammar encyclopedia".

Grande grammatica italiana di consultazione
I am mentioning this one only for completeness. A large descriptive grammar.
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Spoonary
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Español (Advanced), Italiano (Intermediate), Esperanto (I try), Deutsch (Beginner)
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Re: Italian study group

Postby Spoonary » Tue Feb 28, 2017 10:36 pm

Oooh thanks a lot Reineke! I'll be sure to give each of those a look before buying anything. :)
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reineke
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Re: Italian study group

Postby reineke » Tue Feb 28, 2017 11:04 pm

Dardaro Trifone is approachable. Second year students used to carry it around my university all the time. Some needed to strategically fail the year because of Italian "language exercises". I was OK with a 1960s copy of Battaglia Pernicone. I don't recall opening it to study Italian. I needed it to explain Italian to examiners. Mehehe, sorry, I felt I needed to mention that.
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aok85
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Re: Italian study group

Postby aok85 » Wed Mar 01, 2017 4:05 pm

A lot of you might have heard about a prominent Italian linguist Mr Tullio De Mauro and his famous book “Guida all’uso delle parole” (“Guide to the use of words”)… For Italian language lovers like us the most useful (from a practical standpoint) part of this book is the list of the most commonly used words of Italian language. The list presented at the end of the book is just that – a list of the most common Italian words (no translation to any other language etc.) classified into three categories: 1) Fundamental lexicon ; 2) High Usage lexicon and 3) High Availability lexicon… Again – there is no translations or samples of usage etc. just a list (which is by itself a great help for someone who wants to learn most “needed” words first)… But, to make a process of accumulation of those most “needed” words easier – I highly recommend considering the following vocabulary:
"Italian - English Vocabulary: 5,300 fundamental and high usage words that cover 96% of everyday speech"
It can be found at amazon (digital or paperback format): https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01D8U1YOY
This vocabulary is based on the list published in Mr Tullio De Mauro’s above mentioned book and it includes ALL words from the first two categories and carefully chosen words from the third.
Knowledge of these 5,300 words covers about 96% of everyday lexicon of Italian language (!) It will enable us to read Italian novels or to handle (without difficulty) any conversation.
As a reading material consider:
Italian Reader: Short Stories (English-Italian Parallel Text): Elementary to Intermediate (A2-B1)
found at amazon (digital or paperback format): https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01EK3I5KE
The “reader” uses almost all words from the referenced vocabulary… it’s really a very useful combo for any Italian language learner (myself included ;) ).
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reineke
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Re: Italian study group

Postby reineke » Thu Mar 02, 2017 11:46 pm

Congiuntivo and other things





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Arnaud
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Re: Italian study group

Postby Arnaud » Fri Mar 03, 2017 5:35 am

aok85 wrote:A lot of you might have heard about a prominent Italian linguist Mr Tullio De Mauro and his famous book “Guida all’uso delle parole” (“Guide to the use of words”)… For Italian language lovers like us the most useful (from a practical standpoint) part of this book is the list of the most commonly used words of Italian language. The list presented at the end of the book is just that – a list of the most common Italian words (no translation to any other language etc.) classified into three categories: 1) Fundamental lexicon ; 2) High Usage lexicon and 3) High Availability lexicon… Again – there is no translations or samples of usage etc. just a list (which is by itself a great help for someone who wants to learn most “needed” words first)… But, to make a process of accumulation of those most “needed” words easier – I highly recommend considering the following vocabulary:
"Italian - English Vocabulary: 5,300 fundamental and high usage words that cover 96% of everyday speech"
It can be found at amazon (digital or paperback format): https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01D8U1YOY
This vocabulary is based on the list published in Mr Tullio De Mauro’s above mentioned book and it includes ALL words from the first two categories and carefully chosen words from the third.
Knowledge of these 5,300 words covers about 96% of everyday lexicon of Italian language (!) It will enable us to read Italian novels or to handle (without difficulty) any conversation.
As a reading material consider:
Italian Reader: Short Stories (English-Italian Parallel Text): Elementary to Intermediate (A2-B1)
found at amazon (digital or paperback format): https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01EK3I5KE
The “reader” uses almost all words from the referenced vocabulary… it’s really a very useful combo for any Italian language learner (myself included ;) ).

You're the author of these books, are you ? 8-)
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