Questions about Dutch sentences

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tommus
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Re: Questions about Dutch sentences

Postby tommus » Mon Apr 17, 2017 1:33 pm

"Ik heb een half pond gehakt nodig."
I need half a pound of ground meat.

Source: Transparent Language - Dutch Word of the Day.

I appreciate getting the WotD. However, I think Transparent could easily do better. For example, occasionally the Word or the Day is not even used in the sample sentence. But more important, there is absolutely no explanation, even where a simple explanation would be very useful.

In this case, it is perhaps implied that this is the normal (or only) way to say this. But a learner wonders if other forms are equally valid, occasionally used, or never used (would sound awkward). So for this sentence, are the following OK or not OK?

1. "Ik heb een half pond gehakt vlees nodig."
2. "Ik heb een half pond gemalen vlees nodig."
3. "Ik heb een half pond gehakt rundvlees nodig."
4. "Ik heb een half pond gemalen rundvlees nodig."

5. Does "gehakt" imply and generally mean "gehakt rundvlees", and if you really wanted pork or chicken, you wouldn't say "gehakt" but something like "varkensgehakt" or "gemalen kip"?

For language learners, it is often just as important to not say what you would be tempted to say (based on your native language, or based on what you might expect) as it is to memorise a somewhat unusual expression (in this case, "hehakt" implying probably "gehakt rundvlees".)
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Re: Questions about Dutch sentences

Postby tommus » Fri Apr 21, 2017 12:07 pm

"Daar zijn verschillende redenen voor."
"Er zijn verschillende redenen voor."
There are various reasons [for it].

Are both "daar" and "er" correct? Is there any subtle difference? Do they depend on any context? Are they equally common?
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Re: Questions about Dutch sentences

Postby tommus » Fri Apr 21, 2017 12:16 pm

"Het bevriest."
"Het vriest."
It freezes. It is freezing.

Are both Dutch sentences correct? Do they mean exactly the same thing? If so, why the difference?
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Re: Questions about Dutch sentences

Postby tarvos » Fri Apr 21, 2017 4:31 pm

tommus wrote:
1. "Ik heb een half pond gehakt vlees nodig."
2. "Ik heb een half pond gemalen vlees nodig."
3. "Ik heb een half pond gehakt rundvlees nodig."
4. "Ik heb een half pond gemalen rundvlees nodig."


Gehakt means "hacked", so it's not used together with vlees unless you literally hacked the meat. Grammatically okay though.

Gemalen is perfectly okay, but gemalen vlees sounds very imprecise.

Gemalen rundvlees is fine but you would use it to specify beef as opposed to the equally common half-om-half.

5. Does "gehakt" imply and generally mean "gehakt rundvlees", and if you really wanted pork or chicken, you wouldn't say "gehakt" but something like "varkensgehakt" or "gemalen kip"?


well it implies beef in general. Pork is an option, so is the vegetarian variant "vegetarisch gehakt", ground chicken is rare.

"Daar zijn verschillende redenen voor."
"Er zijn verschillende redenen voor."
There are various reasons [for it].


Er is neutral, we don't care where it happened - daar is referring to something specific. Usually this is far away from the speaker.
Last edited by tarvos on Fri Apr 21, 2017 4:49 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Questions about Dutch sentences

Postby tarvos » Fri Apr 21, 2017 4:47 pm

"Het bevriest."
"Het vriest."
It freezes. It is freezing.


1. about an object freezing right now, or transitive - freezing a certain object
2. it is freezing outside (of weather)
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Re: Questions about Dutch sentences

Postby tommus » Wed Apr 26, 2017 2:39 pm

"Het is beter voor je lichaam om iets warms te drinken in plaats van iets ijskouds."
It is better for your body to drink something warm rather than something ice cold.

Why is there an "s" on warm and ijskoud?
Could the sentence be written correctly without adding "s" to these two words?
Are there other Dutch words like these that can get this "s" where L2 speakers might not expect to see an "s"?
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Re: Questions about Dutch sentences

Postby tarvos » Wed Apr 26, 2017 3:02 pm

There has to be an s here, and it's because all of these partitive constructions require an "s" to be added.

"Niets nieuws onder de zon" - Nothing new under the sun

"Ik geef je wat lekkers" - I'll give you some goodies.

"Heb je iets warms aangetrokken?" - Did you put on something warm?

Every time you see niets, iets, niks, wat with an adjective - remember, there has to be an s.

ALL adjectives take them.
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