Smallwhite needs help with English expressions

Ask specific questions about your target languages. Beginner questions welcome!
dampingwire
Green Belt
Posts: 256
Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2015 8:11 pm
Location: Abingdon, UK
Languages: Italian (N), English (N), French (poor, not studying), Japanese (studying, JLPT N3)
x 166

Re: Smallwhite needs help with English vocabulary

Postby dampingwire » Sat Sep 24, 2016 10:05 am

PeterMollenburg wrote:
smallwhite wrote:
Question 2, English

Let's say today is the 1st, and the "Best before" date on my bread says the 5th, but I know that it will actually go mouldy by the 3rd. How do I say, "It can't actually last for 5 days; it will go mouldy in 3 days"? I don't think "last" is the right word, and the whole sentence doesn't sound natural either.

Cantonese: 擺 [verb] = put, place
"擺唔倒五日" = can't put for five days
Similary, "吃不到五日" = can't eat for five days, "用唔倒十年" can't use for ten years

Thanks!


"Last" sounds fine to me, but "can't" doesn't. I would rephrase it like this- "It won't actually last for 5 days; it will go mouldy in 3 (days)"


That answer is perfectly correct, but you could also say "It won't actually keep for 5 days; it will go mouldy in 3."

You should also buy your bread from somewhere with more reliable labelling :-)
3 x
新完全マスター N2聴解 : 94 / 103新完全マスター N2読解 : 99 / 177
新完全マスター N2文法 : 197 / 197TY Comp. German : 0 / 389

Cainntear
Blue Belt
Posts: 687
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2015 11:04 am
Location: Scotland
Languages: English(N)
Advanced: French,Spanish, Scottish Gaelic
Intermediate: Italian, Catalan, Corsican
Basic: Welsh
Dabbling: Polish, Russian etc
x 1303
Contact:

Re: Smallwhite needs help with English vocabulary

Postby Cainntear » Sat Sep 24, 2016 10:06 am

smallwhite wrote:As for that damn bread (from Aldi) that doesn't last for the 5 days it says it should... "doesn't last 3 days" didn't sound right to me because it means to me "will be eaten up within 3 days" more than "will stay fresh for 3 days". I shall now make it sound right to me :twisted:

An alternative is "keep". "It won't keep for 3 days." I'm not sure how universal this is -- it might be a slightly old-fashioned term.
1 x

Online
User avatar
smallwhite
Blue Belt
Posts: 819
Joined: Mon Jul 06, 2015 6:55 am
Location: AU
Languages: .
Speaking: Cantonese (n) > Mandarin > Eng > Spa > Fra (C1) > Ita > Nld.
Dreading: Deu.
Studying: Swe > Ell.
·
x 1182
Contact:

Re: Smallwhite needs help with English vocabulary

Postby smallwhite » Sat Sep 24, 2016 10:26 am

dampingwire wrote:you could also say "It won't actually keep for 5 days; it will go mouldy in 3."

Oh. :shock: "keep" is actually what I said to my friend. I thought it was comprehensible but wrong :shock:
1 x
: XX - Greek
: 11 / 12 Hippocrene Greek, wave 1
: 00 / 12 Hippocrene Greek, wave 2

Online
User avatar
Adrianslont
Orange Belt
Posts: 226
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2015 10:39 am
Location: Australia
Languages: English (N), Indonesian (lower intermediate?) French (A2?)
x 254

Re: Smallwhite needs help with English vocabulary

Postby Adrianslont » Sat Sep 24, 2016 10:38 am

smallwhite wrote:
dampingwire wrote:you could also say "It won't actually keep for 5 days; it will go mouldy in 3."

Oh. :shock: "keep" is actually what I said to my friend. I thought it was comprehensible but wrong :shock:

Oops, yes, "keep" is, in my revised opinion, better than "last". "Last" might imply that you like it so much that you will gobble it up. That problem is overcome if you mention the mould, though!

I will say however that "keep" sounds like one of those words younger people don't tend to use - in Australia anyway. Not use it in this way, I mean.
1 x
: 2779 / 10000 SRS 10k challenge
: 220 / 610 610 days

User avatar
jeff_lindqvist
Blue Belt
Posts: 746
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2015 9:52 pm
Languages: sv, en
de, es
ga, eo
---
fi, yue, ro, tp, cy, kw, pt, sk
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=2773
x 1114

Re: Smallwhite needs help with English vocabulary

Postby jeff_lindqvist » Sat Sep 24, 2016 11:24 am

Handicapped, disabled and even challenged can be stigmatizing these days, so in Sweden some organizations use the term variety. Abilities aren't disabled/challenged - they vary from person to person. Who knows if the term will survive.
2 x
Leabhair/Greannáin léite as Gaeilge: 9 / 18
Ar an seastán oíche: Oileán an Órchiste
Duolingo - finished trees: sp/ga/de/fr/pt/it
Finnish with extra pain : 100 / 100

User avatar
tomgosse
Blue Belt
Posts: 979
Joined: Tue Aug 25, 2015 11:29 am
Location: Massachusetts, USA
Languages: English (Native)
French (A1)
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1185
x 1716
Contact:

Re: Smallwhite needs help with English vocabulary

Postby tomgosse » Sat Sep 24, 2016 11:52 am

smallwhite wrote:What is the proper, everyday noun or adjective to describe a mentally retarded person? One of my childhood friends is about 10 years older than me, but has appeared like a 4 year old ever since I can remember. So, he can eat by himself but he can't wash his own hair, can't read and can't be left alone. How do I say, for example, "I grew up with a childhood friend who is mentally retarded so I know..."?

Cantonese: 弱智 [adjective]
That's the proper word though we use it to insult people as well.
Thanks!

In the United States the word retard is now considered very pejorative. And, by law, can no longer be used in Federal Documents.
2 x
Rejoignez notre groupe français ! Les Voyageurs

Aozora
Orange Belt
Posts: 156
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2016 3:46 pm
Location: Canada
Languages: English(N), Japanese (N2), French (A2)
Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=2228
x 76

Re: Smallwhite needs help with English vocabulary

Postby Aozora » Sat Sep 24, 2016 2:40 pm

jeff_lindqvist wrote:Handicapped, disabled and even challenged can be stigmatizing these days, so in Sweden some organizations use the term variety. Abilities aren't disabled/challenged - they vary from person to person. Who knows if the term will survive.

It seems the acceptable terminology changes as people latch on to the previous term to insult or put down people :( Like the term "special needs" which isn't derogatory at all, but now people say, "Oh he's special" to make fun of someone so it starts taking on negative connotations. I hadn't heard of "intellectual disability" until this thread. Sorry to sidetrack the thread further.
2 x
SC Japanese books : 3009 / 5000
SC Japanese films : 100 / 100 : 53 / 100
April Vocab : 770 / 1000

User avatar
Serpent
Black Belt - 2nd Dan
Posts: 2198
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 10:54 am
Location: Moskova
Languages: heritage
Russian (native); Belarusian, Polish

fluent or close: Finnish+ (certified C1), English; Portuguese, Spanish, German+, Italian+
learning: Croatian+, Ukrainian, Czech; Romanian+, Galician; Danish, Swedish
exploring: Latin, Karelian, Catalan, Dutch, Chaucer's English
+ means exploring the dialects/variants
x 2708
Contact:

Re: Smallwhite needs help with English vocabulary

Postby Serpent » Sat Sep 24, 2016 6:38 pm

Yeah, that's an unfortunate tendency. Abled people can't do much about it though, other than avoiding the derogatory usage, of course.
2 x
: 2 / 40 Budva na pjenu od mora: 3rd season (Croatian/Montenegrin)
LyricsTraining now offers Catalan, Turkish and Japanese romaji

dampingwire
Green Belt
Posts: 256
Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2015 8:11 pm
Location: Abingdon, UK
Languages: Italian (N), English (N), French (poor, not studying), Japanese (studying, JLPT N3)
x 166

Re: Smallwhite needs help with English vocabulary

Postby dampingwire » Sat Sep 24, 2016 10:41 pm

Aozora wrote: Like the term "special needs" which isn't derogatory at all, but now people say, "Oh he's special" to make fun of someone so it starts taking on negative connotations. I hadn't heard of "intellectual disability" until this thread. Sorry to sidetrack the thread further.


In the UK special needs has been used for a long time to refer to children at school who have particular requirements, usually caused by a learning difficulty or physical disability. A special school is one which caters exclusively for pupils with special needs. That terminology has been around since at least the 1970s (in the UK, at least).
2 x
新完全マスター N2聴解 : 94 / 103新完全マスター N2読解 : 99 / 177
新完全マスター N2文法 : 197 / 197TY Comp. German : 0 / 389

Cainntear
Blue Belt
Posts: 687
Joined: Thu Jul 30, 2015 11:04 am
Location: Scotland
Languages: English(N)
Advanced: French,Spanish, Scottish Gaelic
Intermediate: Italian, Catalan, Corsican
Basic: Welsh
Dabbling: Polish, Russian etc
x 1303
Contact:

Re: Smallwhite needs help with English vocabulary

Postby Cainntear » Sat Sep 24, 2016 10:49 pm

jeff_lindqvist wrote:Handicapped, disabled and even challenged can be stigmatizing these days, so in Sweden some organizations use the term variety. Abilities aren't disabled/challenged - they vary from person to person. Who knows if the term will survive.

In the UK, "learning disability" is often used for conditions like Down's and ASD. It's not considered derogatory. "Mentally disabled" or the older"mentally handicapped" would be considered offensive.
1 x


Return to “Practical Questions and Advice”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest