K-dramas: Here I come!

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Evita
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Languages: I speak: Latvian, English, Russian, German
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Language Log: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1141
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Re: K-dramas: Here I come!

Postby Evita » Tue Mar 14, 2017 8:45 pm

AndyMeg wrote:By the way, if you want to listen to the complete song, here it is:


This is one of my favorite Korean songs. One of the few where I know most of the lyrics by heart :D I haven't been into dramas recently but I'll check out the one you're watching, maybe I'll like it.
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AndyMeg
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Re: K-dramas: Here I come!

Postby AndyMeg » Tue Mar 14, 2017 10:55 pm

Evita wrote:
AndyMeg wrote:By the way, if you want to listen to the complete song, here it is:


This is one of my favorite Korean songs. One of the few where I know most of the lyrics by heart :D I haven't been into dramas recently but I'll check out the one you're watching, maybe I'll like it.


I really like "Tomorrow With You" (내일 그대와). It is one of the reasons I'm using it to study. I enjoy the characters and the plot. I want to know what'll happen next, so I keep watching and studying. I hope you like it too. ;)
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AndyMeg
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Re: K-dramas: Here I come!

Postby AndyMeg » Sun Mar 19, 2017 6:58 pm

I'm think I'm finally settling on a learning routine.

- Glossika:

After trying many alternatives, this is the one I've been sticking to:

1) I use Glossika Level 1, Track C and listen to a sentence and try to write it from what I hear.
2) I compare what I wrote with the official korean transcription.
3) I write again the sentences, this time copying the official korean transcription.
4) I try to match the english sentence with the different parts of the korean transcription. When in doubt about something, I look for answers on the internet or in some books I have. *
5) Listen again to the C track, pause it and try to repeat the sentence by reading the official transcript.
6) Move on to the next sentence and repeat the same process.

I work like this for a pomodoro (25 uninterrupted minutes) a day. Usually early in the morning after I eat breakfast.

After I've studied two more new sentences this way, I go back to sentence one and repeat the same process again from the beginning (it may take more than one day until I reach again 2 new sentences, but it really helps with retention). My idea is to keep doing this until I reach sentence 50 and then start a new batch of 50 sentences.

* I'm not going deep into grammar right now, so if I see a particle I just signal it as "Particle" and move on. But I really want to grasp how verbs and adjectives work, so I've been consulting these books a lot: "500 Basic Korean Verbs" and "500 Basic Korean Adjectives". What I like about this books is that they are very complete and show not only the mode each ending represents (Declarative, Inquisitive, Propositive, Imperative) and the tense (Present, Past or Future), but also the formality level (Informal-Low, Informal-High, Formal-Low and Formal-High) that each ending indicates. This made me feel really curious about the actual use of the different formality levels, so I looked for more information and found this:

Level 3 Lesson 27 / Politeness Levels / 반말 and 존댓말

How 반말 Works – Casual/Informal Language in Korean

Also, I thought that I needed at least a very basic overview of how korean works, so I've been reading the "Introduction to the Korean Language" part of the book "Korean Grammar in Use: Beginning to Early Intermediate". In twelve pages it covers the following topics:

°Korean Sentence Structure
°Conjugations of Verbs and Adjectives
°Connecting Sentences
°Sentence Types
°Honorific Expressions

- After many experiments, I think I've finally settled on a way to work trough the k-drama "Tomorrow With You" (내일 그대와):

1) At morning, as soon as I wake up: Watch a (no-subbed) 20 minutes new segment.
2) At night, before going to bed: Watch again the 20 minutes from the morning, but this time with english subs. Then, watch the same segment without subs.

To my surprise, it is becoming quite a pleasant routine, so I'm happy about that :D

- I finally got a live talk on skype with a japanese/korean native speaker I've been texting with for some months now (mainly in spanish with some japanese mixed in). We talked for a long time and I asked him many questions about Korea and the language. One of the doubts I cleared was the actual pronunciation of the word I mentioned here:

AndyMeg wrote:A line of dialogue from the drama "Tomorrow With You" ("I don't know what it is, but I'm not curious to find out") reminded me of one of my favorite scenes from k-drama "Kill Me, Heal Me". The word that triggered the memory sounded like "bunme". Here is the scene from "Kill Me, Heal Me":



"I won't wear it"
"Wear it"
"I won't wear it"
"Wear it"
"I won't wear it, get rid of it"
"I won't get rid of it, wear it"
"I won't wear it, get rid of it"
"I won't get rid of it, wear it"
"I w-w-w-w-won't wear it, g-g-g-g-et rid of it"

This scene is just soooo funny! And the actors ad-libbed the rapping part! :mrgreen:


The actual word used in "Kill Me, Heal Me" (킬미, 힐미 ) wasn't "bunme" but 못매. And it is an Informal-Low way (반말) of saying "I won't wear it". Thanks to this I also realized that sometimes I can't differentiate well between the way koreans pronounce ㅁ and ㅂ.

- Thanks to all the above, I'm starting to differenciate between formality levels used in Korean. Now, when I'm watching a k-drama I try to notice the endings of verbs and adjectives to get an idea of the formality level they are using each time. Also, I'm trying to pay special attention to when and with whom they use each formality level, and I've found it is more complex that what it may actually seem. For example, yesterday I started watching a k-drama with english subs: 38 Task Force (38사기동대 ) and there is a team that go around trying to collect taxes from tax evaders. Most of the team members are about the same age, but the leader is much older. When they where on a van, one of the members talked in general to the others (including the leader) using the Informal-Low way (반말), but when he directly talked to the leader he changed to a more formal language (존댓말). In the same episode, the leader got pissed off with one of the tax evaders for talking to him in the Informal-Low way (반말) and asked for his ID (I suppose he wanted to check his age to see who was older).

- On Memrise I'm still studying the conjuctions and ocasionally reviewing the first batch of 30 nouns.
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AndyMeg
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Languages: Spanish (N), English (B2-C1), Japanese (A2-B1), Korean (Absolute Beginner)
Language Log: http://www.forum.language-learners.org/ ... =15&t=5354
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Re: K-dramas: Here I come!

Postby AndyMeg » Mon Mar 20, 2017 4:42 pm

Quick update:

- Glossika:

I think that going back to the first sentence after every two new sentences is too slow a pace, so I decided that I'll go back to the first sentence after every five new sentences.

My main focus with Glossika right now is to improve my listening and become better at matching it with their written counterpart. I also want to improve my writing (here I'm not talking about production, but just to get used to how korean is written). Another goal with my current use of Glossika is to become aware of how the korean language is structured and how phrases and sentences are formed. For now the only grammar I'll look at is that directly related to adjectives and verbs (mainly using the two books I mentioned in my previous post), and only at a "as needed" basis for getting a better understanding of Glossika's sentences. I'll try to guess the function of particles in the korean sentences based on the english version of the same sentences. At some point in the future I plan to read about the use of particles so I can contrast it with my deductions and correct any mistakes I could have made.

As a by-product of my way of working with Glossika, I may end up learning some or even many of the actual sentences, but that will not be my focus or intention for now. For now, what I do want to remember is how to write korean, the right way to form syllables and transcribe spoken language into the written form.

- With the drama "Tomorrow With You" (내일 그대와) I'm focusing on different things each time I watch the same segment:

1) The first time a watch a segment (no-subbed), I pay special attention to the sounds, the way actors move their mouths in order to produce those sounds and I try to imitate those movements to get my language production muscles acustomed to pronouncing korean. This is a focused mode.
2) The second time (with english subs) I just try to enjoy the drama. I think more on story-related terms than on language learning. This is a somehow difuse mode that sometimes allows me to make interesting connections between meaning and the actual usage of words and expressions.
3) The third and final time (no-subbed) I try to see how much I can understand and connect now that I know what they are saying. I also pay attention to the different levels of formality that characters use between them.

If at any time I get really curious about something (a word, an expression, etc.), I pause the video and look for it on the internet. Sometimes I get really interesting answers, and sometimes I can't even find the word or expression (probably because I'm not hearing it right, or maybe because it is a very informal or rare form of the language).

- I finished reading the "Introduction to the Korean Language" part of the book "Korean Grammar in Use: Beginning to Early Intermediate". It was interesting to see how the Informal-High basically uses the same endings for every kind of sentence (declarative, interrogative, imperative and propositive), and the actual meaning is mainly expressed by intonation and deduced by context.

Another thing that I found really interesting was the part of "Honorific Expressions". I think this part is more challenging than the formality levels because it seems to be more complex, so I'll come back from time to time to re-read it because I want to have it more present when watching korean TV, so I can detect how it is actually used by natives. Probably in the future I'll try to go deeper into this topic, but for now I think it's too early to start tackling that.
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