Proposed Polish profile

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Chung
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Proposed Polish profile

Postby Chung » Sun Aug 21, 2016 4:17 am

LANGUAGE PROFILE - POLISH

General information

Polish (Język polski, Polszczyzna) is a Slavonic language spoken by approximately 43 million people worldwide. Polish is most closely related to Lower Sorbian, slightly less so to Czech, Slovak and Upper Sorbian and even less so to other Slavonic languages such as Belorussian, Ukrainian, Bosnian-Croatian-Monenegrin-Serbian and Bulgarian. It is the official language of Poland.

It is also spoken by ethnic Poles in Czech Republic, Slovakia, Ukraine, Belarus and Lithuania. Some descendants of Polish immigrants in Australia, Western Europe and the Americas also speak the language natively. Poland's entry in the EU in 2004 has led to an influx of Poles to western Europe, in particular to the UK. Of the approximately 1,000,000 people of Polish origin in the UK, almost 800,000 are residents (i.e. not necessarily British-born with many part of this wave of migration since 2004), and Polish is now the second-most spoken language in England with a sizeable representation also in Scotland.

The usefulness of Polish is limited in practice to Poland, however. For Polish communities outside Poland, one can usually communicate in other languages (e.g. one can usually communicate in English with Poles who live in the UK). As in many countries in Central Europe, ESL teaching is widespread and many young adults and teenagers speak at least some English. The present form of Poland's borders has existed only since 1945. Indeed Poland did not exist as a sovereign state from 1795 to 1919. During this period, the historical Polish territory was partitioned by Prussia, Austria and Russia. As such some elderly Poles speak varying degrees of German or Russian as a legacy of these partitions. During the Second Republic (1920-1939), the country was located more to the east than the present version of the country. Indeed much of what is now western Poland was then part of Germany, while most of the eastern region of the Second Republic is now part of Lithuania, Belarus and Ukraine. Given the proximity to Germany and Poland's ties to Germanic culture, a knowledge of German is still useful for Poles who work in tourism, politics and commerce. It is slightly more difficult to find speakers of English outside the larger Polish cities. As such, a prospective visitor to smaller Polish towns and villages should expect to encounter more people who speak only Polish. Those who had come of age during the communist period also learned Russian as part of the mandatory imposition of Soviet culture during the Cold War. However, it is understandable that many of these Poles refuse to speak Russian because of the association with the oppressive days of communism in addition to the animosity between Poles and Russians that has existed since the Middle Ages.

Varieties/Dialects

Standard Polish is taught in all schools and used as the official language. It is based primarily on the dialect spoken around Warszawa and one can often rely on a knowledge of only the standard language when communicating with other Poles. However, there are Polish dialects and these are usually divided into four groups: Wielkopolski (Great Polish - western group), Małopolski (Little Polish - southern group), Mazowiecki (Mazovian - central group around Warszawa) and Śląski (Silesian - southwestern group). As one travels south towards Silesia, the language becomes more and more distinct from standard Polish and is part of a dialectal continuum with the Silesian (Lachian) dialects in the northeastern part of the Czech Republic and northwestern Slovakia. The dialects spoken in extreme southern Silesia near Cieszyn sound like a mix of Czech, Polish and Slovak with some German words. Mention should also be made of the speech of the Kashubes in northwestern Poland. Depending on the source, the language of the Kashubes is either a dialect or a language. While Kashubian is most closely related to Polish, it is often distinct enough that many Poles have difficulty in understanding it.

Learning with a background in other languages

According to FSI, it takes approximately 1100 class hours to acheive professional speaking and reading proficiency in Polish for a motivated learner who knows only English.

As suggested in the section on intelligibility, learners with a background in other Slavonic languages will find learning Polish less onerous to various degrees depending on how similar their respective languages are to Polish.

For English speakers, the greatest difficulties in my opinion are:
    1) Verbal aspect
    2) Verbs of motion
    3) Syntax
    4) Nominal and adjectival declension
    5) Vocabulary

Overview of grammar

Stress in Polish is usually fixed on the penultimate (second-last) syllable of words. Exceptions are in some loanwords and certain conjugated verbal forms. All vowels are short. Exceptionally, Polish has nasal vowels unlike the other modern Slavonic languages. These nasal vowels are somewhat similar to those in French and Portuguese. The Proto-Slavonic language had nasal vowels and Polish is the only daughter language to have retained this type of sound.

In spite of this, Polish pronunication is rather simple and phonetic despite the intimdating appearance to those unaccustomed to consonant clusters, acute accents, tails and dots.

Like most other Slavonic languages, Polish has elaborate inflections for nouns and adjectives.

There are seven cases: nominative, accusative, genitive, dative, locative, instrumental, and vocative.

There are in practice two numbers: singular and plural. Remnants of the dual are present in a few instances of declension but these are usually taught as exceptions given how restricted the forms are.

There are three genders: masculine, feminine and neuter with masculine divided further into animate and inanimate categories in the declensions of the nominative and accusative.

There are four moods: infinitive, indicative, conditional and imperative

There are two voices: active and passive

There are three tenses: past, present and future

There are two verbal aspects: imperfective and perfective (these aspects deal with the concept of whether the verb describes an action that was/is/will be repetitive/ongoing OR an action that was/is/will be completed.). This means that most actions are expressed with an imperfective and a corresponding perfective verb.

Because of Polish's inflective nature, personal subject pronouns are usually omitted unless the speaker wishes to emphasize or clarify the subject of a sentence.

Syntax is usually subject-verb-object but this can change depending on the focus or nuance that a speaker wishes to convey. Thus, syntax can be rather flexible compared to English as much of the relevant grammatical information of a sentence is revealed in the inflections, suffixes and prefixes of the words.

Adjectives can precede or follow the nouns that they describe. This depends on whether the adjective describes an intrinsic quality of the noun.

For intrinsic qualities, the adjective follows the noun.

E.g. język polski "Polish language" (literally 'language Polish' - the reasoning is that there is only one Polish language)

For non-intrinsic qualities, the adjective precedes the noun.

E.g. czerwony samolot "red airplane" (literally 'red airplane' - the reasoning is that the colour of an airplane is not an intrinsic quality)

Sometimes the order can be expressed both ways.

E.g. impreza urodzinowa OR urodzinowa impreza "birthday party" (literally 'party birthday' or 'birthday party' - both versions are acceptable)

In addition, adjectives must agree with the nouns that they describe:

    - mały chłopiec "small boy" (masculine animate nominative singular)
    - duży zeszyt "big notebook" (masculine inanimate nominative singular)
    - mała dziewczyna "small girl" (feminine nominative singular)
    - czerwone auto "red car" (neuter nominative singular)
    - mali chłopcy "small boys" (masculine animate nominative plural)
    - duże zeszyty "big notebooks" (masculine inanimate nominative plural)
    - małe dziewczyny "small girls" (feminine nominative plural)
    - czerwone auta "red cars" (neuter nominative plural)

Polish spelling is quite phonemic but there are a few exceptions. For example, a final ę in a word such as się is often pronounced as e (i.e. without nasalization). Polish uses a Latinic alphabet with special characters for English-speakers being ą, cz, ć, ę, ł, ń, ó, rz, sz, ś, ż, and ź.

Basic vocabulary is generally quite removed from that of English even though both languages are both Indo-European languages.

    - dwa "two"
    - trzy "three"
    - cztery "four" (it's a distant link - only a linguist can explain how cz- is connected to 'f-' in 'four'.)
    - pięć "five"
    - mleko "milk"
    - woda "water"
    - brat "brother"
    - siostra "sister"
    - syn "son"
    - żona "wife" (cf. English 'queen' - it's a distant cognate)
    - żyć "to live" (cf. English 'quick' - it's a distant cognate)
    - śnieg "snow"
    - ty, wy "you" (singular), "you" (plural)
    - noc "night"
    - godzina "hour" (cf. English 'good' - it's a distant cognate)
    - nos "nose"
    - jutro "tomorrow"
    - dzisiaj "today"
    - wczoraj "yesterday"

In addition to native Slavonic vocabulary, Polish has borrowed many words from other languages, especially Czech, French and German. Latin loanwords exist also primarily because of the influence of Roman Catholicism. English loanwords are more prevelant in contemporary Polish than in older varieties of Polish because of the influence of American pop culture, the internet and sports.

E.g.

    hańba "shame" (cf. Czech hanba), brama "gate" (cf. Czech brána)

    koszmar "nightmare" (cf. French cauchemar), bilet "ticket" (cf. French billet), makijaż "makeup" (cf. French maquillage)

    szlachta "nobility" (cf. German Geschlecht); cukier "sugar" (cf. German Zucker)

    komputer, internet, menedżer ("manager"), tost ("toast(ed bread)"), kick-boxing, didżej ("DJ")

The T-V distinction in Polish is exceptional among Slavonic languages since it goes beyond the two-way distinction using 2nd person singular and plural. 2nd person forms regardless of number are used for informal address while forms governing the 3rd person are used for formal address.

Informal forms of address:

    ty takes 2nd person singular - masculine or feminine depending on the addressee)
    wy takes 2nd person plural - masculine or feminine depending on the company)

    E.g.
    - Cześć Aneto! Jak się masz (ty)? "Hi Aneta! How are you?"
    - Cześć chłopaki! Jak się macie (wy)? "Hi guys! How are you?"

Formal forms of address:

    pan (singular male - takes 3rd person singular masculine)
    pani (singular female - takes 3rd person singular feminine)
    panowie (plural, all males - takes 3rd person plural masculine)
    panie (plural, all females - takes 3rd person plural feminine)
    państwo (plural mixed company - takes 3rd person plural masculine)

    E.g.
    - Dzień dobry! Jak się pan ma? "Hello! How are you (sir)?"
    - Dzień dobry! Jak się pani ma? "Hello! How are you (ma'am)?"
    - Dzień dobry! Jak się państwo mają? "Hello! How are you (all)?"

Mutual intelligibility with other languages

Most English-speaking learners will find little in Polish that is instantly familiar at the outset apart from most of the Polish alphabet and the occasional internationalism (e.g. hotel, komputer, policja).

Polish is intelligible in varying degrees to native speakers of other Slavonic languages without courses or special training, although this "untrained intelligibility" isn't that high unless one speaks Kashubian. Here are some hints that may help with making sense of Polish for people speaking at least one Slavonic language other than Polish.

    1) The Late-Common Slavonic cluster of *-tj- evolved into -c- in Czech, Polish and Slovak.

    E.g.

    - *světja > svíce (Czech); świeca (Polish); svieca (Slovak) "candle" (cf. sv(ij)eća (BCMS/SC); свеча (Russian))

    2) The Late-Common Slavonic sequence of initial *je- is preserved in Czech, Polish, Slovak and BCMS/Serbo-Croatian.

    E.g.

    - *(j)edinъ > jeden (Czech, Polish, Slovak); jedan (BCMS/SC) "one" (cf. один (Russian, Ukrainian), ena (Slovenian))

    3) The Late-Common Slavonic cluster of *-dj- became -dz- as in Slovak.

    E.g.

    - *medju > między (Polish); medzi (Slovak) "between" (cf. među (BCMS/SC); mezi (Czech); между (Russian))

    4) The Late-Common Slavonic *g is retained as in BCMS/SC, Bulgarian, Lower Sorbian, Russian, and Slovenian. In the remaining Slavonic languages it has become h. This is also tied to why h does not occur frequently in Polish.

    E.g.

    - głowa (Polish, Kashubian); glava (BCMS/SC, Slovenian); глава (Bulgarian, Macedonian); гoлoва (Russian) "head" (Cf. галава (Belorussian - pronounced 'halava'); hlava (Czech, Slovak); гoлoва (Ukrainian - pronounced 'holova'))

    5) Polish stress is generally fixed on the second-last syllable as in Rusyn, and dialects in northeastern Czech Republic ("Lachian") and eastern Slovakia.

    6) All Polish vowels are the same short length like in Belorussian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian and Ukrainian.

    7) The reflexive pronoun się can be included in verbal nouns as in Slovak.

    E.g.

    - uczyć się / uczenie się (Polish); učiť sa / učenie sa (Slovak) "to learn" / "[the] learning" (Cf. učit se / učení (Czech))

    8) Polish verbs of motion are similar to those of Belorussian, Czech, Russian and Ukrainian in that motion on foot uses a different verb from motion with a vehicle.

    E.g.

    - idę (Polish); іду (Belorussian, Ukrainian); jdu (Czech); иду (Russian) "I go [on foot]" (Cf. idem (BCMS/SC, Slovak); ида (Bulgarian))

    - jadę (Polish); еду (Belorussian, Russian); jedu (Czech); ïду (Ukrainian) "I go [by vehicle]" (Cf. idem (BCMS/SC, Slovak); ида (Bulgarian))

    9) Polish can express the future of an imperfective verb by combining the future tense of "to be" and the quasi-past participle as in Slovenian. (N.B. The defined future tense in BCMS/SC (called "Futur II") also uses this combination although it does not convey the same nuance of general future activity as in Polish and Slovenian)

    E.g.

    - będę widział(a) (Polish); bum videl(a) (Slovenian) "I will be seeing" (Cf. vidjet ću (BCMS/SC); буду видеть (Russian); budem vidieť (Slovak))

    10) As in Belorussian, Russian, Slovak and Ukrainian, the Polish accusative plural endings for adjectives and nouns denoting masculine humans are the same as those for the genitive plural (in fact this concept is taken further in Russian in that all animate (i.e. masculine or feminine, animal or human) nouns and adjectives in accusative plural take genitive plural endings).

    E.g.

    "I see new [male] students"
    - Ja widzę nowych studentów (Polish)
    - Я бачу новых студэнтаў (Belorussian)
    - Я вижу новых студентов (Russian)
    - Ja vidím nových študentov (Slovak)
    - Я бачу нових студентів (Ukrainian)

    versus

    - Ja vidim nove studente (BCMS/SC)
    - Aз виждам нови студенти (Bulgarian)
    - Ja vidím nové studenty (Czech)
    - Jac гледам нови студенти (Macedonian)
    - Jaz vidim nove študente (Slovenian)

Literature / Media / Film / Music

Polish jokes aside, Polish culture is quite rich and has given much to the rest of the world. In music, the most famous Pole is Fryderyk (Fréderic) Chopin who was born in Poland to a French father and Polish mother. Other classical notables include Karol Szymanowski and Henryk Górecki. More modern representatives include the singers Edyta Górniak, and Doda and the rapper O.S.T.R. (Adam Ostrowski).

Documents of Polish literature can be traced as far back as the Middle Ages but it was not until the Renaissance that (Middle) Polish began to be used frequently as a means of literary expression. Prior to this period most literary expression was in Latin. Notable Polish writers include Jan Kochanowski, Ignacy Krasicki, Adam Mickiewicz, Zygmunt Krasiński, Józef Ignacy Kraszewski, Cyprian Kamil Norwid, Juliusz Słowacki, Maria Konopnicka, Henryk Sienkiewicz, Bolesław Prus, Władysław Reymont, Stanisław Wyspiański, Witold Gombrowicz, Andrzej Stasiuk, Wisława Szymborska, Czesław Miłosz, Stanisław Lem, and Olga Tokarczuk. Of these, Sienkiewicz, Reymont, Miłosz and Szymborska are Nobel Prize-winners.

Polish film is no less accomplished than Polish literature after accounting for the fact that cinematography only began in earnest in the late 19th century. Poland's film industry is based in the central city Łódź and its film school counts directors Roman Polański and Krzysztof Zanussi as graduates. Other notable figures include directors Andrzej Wajda, Krzysztof Kieślowski and Agnieszka Holland and the actress Izabella Scorupco. Polish films of note include Wajda's Popiół i diament, Polański's Nóż w wodzie, Miś by Stanisław Bareja and Faraon by Jerzy Kawalerowicz.

Learning material

i) Books

    1) Teach Yourself Polish (Nigel Gotteri and Joanna Michalak-Gray) (price: approx $40 US)
    - It comes with two CDs or audio cassettes and a textbook.
    - What I enjoyed most about this course was that it had lively dialogues and useful information on grammar. It also comes with exercises for each chapter and answers at the back of the book.
    - What I enjoyed least about this course was that its presentation of grammar was somewhat unstructured and could intimidate the learner at first. In the interest of keeping lively dialogues, it's natural that the language used would have relatively complex structures for a beginner and some idioms. The grammar section of each chapter would focus on the grammatical aspects of each set of dialogues. It would have been desirable if the textbook had included more exercises.

    2) Colloquial Polish (Bolesław Masur) (price: approx $50 US)
    - It comes with two CDs or audio cassettes and a textbook.
    - The audio for the latest edition can also be obtained as a free download from the publisher, Routledge.
    - What I enjoyed about this course was that it had good dialogues (perhaps not as lively as those used in the Teach Yourself course) and useful information on grammar. It also comes with exercises for each chapter and answers at the back of the book.
    - Compared to the Teach Yourself course, 'Colloquial Polish' has a somewhat better presentation of grammar since the dialogues are designed in a way to emphasize the grammar or theme of a given chapter. It would have been desirable if the textbook had included more exercises. As a first step, Colloquial Polish would probably be a slightly better starting point for the absolute beginner because of its better presentation.

    3) Pimsleur's Polish Comprehensive I (price: between $150 US to $250 US)
    - It comes with 16 CDs and a small primer
    - What I enjoy about this course is that you can acquire a reasonably good accent of basic phrases after going through its exercises of reading the primer and repeating after the speaker.
    - This is a typical Pimsleur course in that the focus is on correct pronounciation and acquiring a small stock of short sentences and vocabulary. Unfortunately, it is expensive and I don't consider the benefit as greater than the cost. If you're an absolute beginner and interested in gaining a satisfactory overall introduction but feel intimidated by more involved introductory courses (ex. 'Beginning Polish' by Alexander Schenker or 'First-Year Polish' by Swan), I would start with 'Teach Yourself Polish' or 'Colloquial Polish'.

    4) First-Year Polish (Oscar Swan) (price: variable)
    - It comes with 5 audio cassettes (first edition) or 6 CDs or audio cassettes (second edition) and a textbook (first or second edition).
    - The audio for the book is also available as .aiff files from the same domain at the University of Pittsburgh that hosts Prof. Swan's learning material for Polish (see "Links" at the bottom of this profile for the URL).
    - What I enjoy about this set is that it is full of exercises, dialogues and explanations and you can acquire a reasonably good grasp of basic Polish after going through the course. Unfortunately, this set is really meant for university students and does not have a key for the exercises. You'll need to get a Polish friend or teacher to correct your exercises or help you with the exercises that ask for oral participation.
    - As an alternative, Dr. Swan has updated this course and set it up online as 'First-Year Polish Course' at his website (see "Links" at the bottom of this profile for the URL). You can print the textbook (provisional online third edition) and do the exercises online with his proprietary software called 'Lektorek'. In addition, half of the dialogues can be played on the internet using Quick Time player. The website also has links to useful sites for students of Polish including an online version of the revised edition of his earlier work: "A Grammar of Contemporary Polish".

    5) Intermediate Polish (Oscar Swan) (price: variable)
    - It comes with 2 audio casettes and a textbook. You can get the textbook from Amazon or Alibiris.com. You can order the set of tapes with the textbook from an organization called Lektorek which is affiliated with Dr. Swan. It is the continuation of his course "First-Year Polish"
    - Like 'First-Year Polish', this set is also full of exercises, dialogues and explanations which will help reinforce and improve your knowledge of Polish. Unfortunately, this set is really meant for university students and does not have a key for the exercises. You'll need to get a Polish friend or teacher to correct your exercises or help you with the exercises that ask for oral participation.
    - Unfortunately, Dr. Swan has not created an online version of this course.

    6) "Beginning Polish" (Alexander Schenker) (price: variable)
    - This course is the nearest to that of a FSI Basic Course for Polish.
    - It comes with two books. Vol. 1 is a textbook with basic sentences, grammatical notes and a few exercises.
    - Vol. 2 is a workbook that is full of drills and also has a glossary and summary of Polish grammar. The drills are similar to the "Substitution" or "Transformation Drills" that are in FSI Basic Courses.
    - The audio drills and recordings for the books are available for free download as MP3 files from Yale University (see "Links" at the bottom of this profile for the URL).
    - Like a lot of FSI courses, the material is presented fairly drily and be aware that its method of drilling may bore some people.
    - Vol. 1 is usually easy to find on Amazon or bookfinder.com but the price seems to vary between $20 and $50 US. Vol. 2 is somewhat harder to find and consequently is often a little more expensive than Vol. 1.

    7) Cześć, jak się masz? (Władyslaw Miodunka) (2nd edition) (cz. 1 (part 1) "Spotykamy się w Polsce" and cz. 2 (part 2) "Spotykamy się w Europie")
    - The first edition is a set of one book and its CD. price is approx. $25 US)
    - The second edition is a set of two books, each with its own CD. (Each part costs about $35 US)
    - (My comments are taken from my experiences with the first edition) What I enjoy about this set is that it has many exercises (but not as many as Swan's books), dialogues and explanations and you can acquire a reasonably good grasp of basic Polish after going through the course. Unfortunately, this set is really meant for university students and does not have a key for the exercises. You'll need to get a Polish friend or teacher to correct your exercises or help you with the exercises that ask for oral participation.
    - It would have been desirable if the textbook had included even more exercises, but this is a relatively minor complaint.
    - Part 1 of the 2nd edition is meant for students at level A1 on ALTE's scale, while Part 2 of the 2nd edition is meant for students at level A2 on the same scale.

    8) Z polskim na ty (Ewa Lipińska) (price: approx $30 US)
    - This book comes with 1 or 2 CDs, depending on the edition.
    - This is a continuation of 'Cześć, jak się masz?', and is also full of exercises, dialogues and explanations which will help reinforce and improve your knowledge of Polish. This set is really meant for university students even though it does come with an answer key in the back and can be useful for those who are learning on their own.
    - It would have been desirable if the textbook had included even more exercises, but this is a relatively minor complaint.
    - It's meant for students at level B1 on ALTE's scale.

    9) Kiedyś wrócisz tu... cz. I (part I); cz. 2 (part II) (Ewa Lipińska and Elżbieta Grażyna Dąmbska) (price: approx. $35 US each)
    - Each book comes with a CD and a textbook.
    - Both parts form a continuing sequence from 'Z polskim na ty', and are also full of exercises, dialogues and explanations which will help reinforce and improve your knowledge of Polish. This set is really meant for university students but it does have a key for about half of the exercises. You'll need to get a Polish friend or teacher to correct your other exercises or help you with the exercises that ask for oral participation.
    - It would have been desirable if the textbooks had included even more exercises, but this is a relatively minor complaint.
    - Part I is meant for students at level B2 on ALTE's scale, while Part II is meant for students at level C1 on the same scale.

    10) Przygoda z gramatyką. Fleksja i słowotwórstwo imion. Ćwiczenia funkcjonalno-gramatyczne dla cudzoziemców (Józef Pyzik) (price: approx. $25 US)
    - It is a textbook giving a good description of Polish nominal and adjectival declension with charts and examples. It also has lots of drills and includes a full key to all exercises.
    - What I enjoy about it is that its full of drills and includes answers. This is perfect for mastering (or at least memorizing) the mechanics of cases.
    - This book is entirely in Polish and isn't very useful to absolute beginners learning on their own. Such a learner might be overwhelmed by the explanations of fine grammatical points in Polish.
    - It's meant for students at levels B2 and C1 on ALTE's scale.

    11) Czas na czasownik (Piotr Garncarek) (price: approx. $25 US)
    - It is a textbook giving brief descriptions of Polish verbal conjugation with charts and examples. Each chapter begins with a text that uses only certain verbs according to their conjugation pattern. The subsequent exercises all involve verbs with the same conjugation pattern. It also includes a full key to all exercises.
    - What I enjoy about it is that its full of drills and includes answers. This is perfect for mastering (or at least memorizing) the conjugations and understanding aspects.
    - This book is entirely in Polish and isn't very useful to absolute beginners learning on their own. Such a learner might be overwhelmed by the explanations of grammatical points in Polish.
    - It's meant for students at level B1 on ALTE's scale.

    12) Iść czy jechać? Ćwiczenia gramatyczno-semantyczne z czasownikami ruchu (Józef Pyzik) (price: approx. $25 US)
    - It is a textbook giving a good description of Polish verbs of motion with charts and examples. It also has lots of drills and includes a full key to all exercises.
    - What I enjoy about it is that it's full of drills and includes answers. This is perfect for mastering (or at least absorbing) that terror of Slavonic languages: verbs of motion.
    - This book is in Polish and English and can be a useful supplement for absolute beginners learning on their own and highly recommended for more advanced learners of the language.
    - It's meant for students at levels B2 and C1 on ALTE's scale.

    13) Praktyczny słownik łączliwości składniowej czasowników polskich (Stanisław Mędak) (Practical Dictionary of Polish Conjugation of Verbs) (price: approx. $40 US)
    - This is an excellent guide to using Polish verbs.
    - It's different from Barron's guides for verb conjugations in other languages (e.g. 501 Russian verbs, etc.) (q.v.)
    - Its entries show information for 1001 verbs as it pertains to case governance and associated prepositions using examples. It also presents information on subtle changes arising from stem mutations or prefixes which are part of Polish verbal aspect.
    - It is entirely in Polish and thus may be more accessible for those who are past the beginner's stage of learning Polish.

    14) 301 Polish Verbs (Klara Janecki) (price: approx. $20 US)
    - A handy reference of Polish verbs giving patterns of conjugation for 301 verbs, and holding an index showing over 2300 verbs, each of which is linked to a verb table in the main section.
    - It's the Polish version of other books by Barrons (e.g. "501 French Verbs", "501 Russian Verbs", etc.)

    15) Polish: An Essential Grammar (Dana Bielec) (price: approx. $30 US)
    - A useful reference book on Polish grammar. It is rather easier to understand than Swan's online reference grammar. Alas Bielec's book isn't as comprehensive as Swan's reference and isn't free. ;-)
    - Bielec has also written two other books 'Basic Polish: A Grammar and Workbook' (approx. $30 US) and 'Intermediate Polish: A Grammar and Workbook' (approx. $35 US) which are textbooks that have exercises for each chapter. While both of Bielec's books have solutions for the exercises, there aren't as many exercises in them as in the books by Pyzik and Garncarek.

    16) Collins słownik angielsko-polski and Collins słownik polsko-angielski (edited by Dr. Jacek Fisiak) (price: approx. $30 US)
    - It's a two volume set edited by Jacek Fisiak and is the most useful and accessible medium two-way dictionary for learners of Polish.
    - It not only includes many idioms and colloquialisms in its entries, but it also indicates the genitive singular form of every noun and important information for the verbs. For the verbs, the imperfective-perfective aspectual pair for each verbal entry is shown along with the conjugation endings in present tense for the 1st person singular ('I') and 2nd person singular ('you') in the Polish-English section. In some cases, it also indicates the declensions and conjugations of exceptional nouns and irregular verbs respectively in the Polish-English section.
    - There is also a smaller and slightly cheaper version of this dictionary in one volume which is obtainable in North America at approximately $30 Canadian or $25 US.

    17) Nowy słownik polsko-angielski, angielsko-polski Fundacji Kościuszkowskiej (edited by Dr. Jacek Fisiak) (price: approx. $120 US)
    - It's also a two-volume set edited by Jacek Fisiak and is the largest two-way dictionary for learners of Polish.
    - You could think of this set as a much larger version of the two-volume set from Collins and includes even more entries and examples. Strangely, it does not indicate the imperfective-perfective aspectual pair for each verbal entry in the Polish-English section. This lessens its utility for learners.

    18) Wielki słownik angielsko-polski & Wielki słownik polsko-angielski. (Great English-Polish Dictionary & Great Polish-English Dictionary - edited by Jan Stanisławski et al.) (price: variable) (Most of the content of this review deals with the older edition. I do not own the newer edition of this set.)
    - This dictionary is a set of four volumes (A to O and P to Z for English-Polish and A to Ó and P to Ź for Polish-English).
    - You can find the older edition from the 1970s in a bookshop that specializes in used books or through bookfinder.com. Depending on the condition of the set, the price can cost anywhere from a few dollars to infinity. :-)). The newer edition from the 1990s is much more expensive and costs about $250 US brand new.
    - What I like most about this set of dictionaries is that it is quite comprehensive. In addition, most entries include useful examples showing idiomatic usage and prepositions and cases that are governed by the verbs where applicable.
    - In the Polish-English volumes, Stanisławski et al. have matched every imperfective verb with its perfective counterpart where applicable. For irregular verbs and verbs whose conjugations cannot be easily deduced, these same volumes show the conjugational pattern of the present tense and sometimes other forms such as the past participle, present adjectival participle and the imperative.
    - The appendices of the Polish-English dictionary have a list of abbreviations and an abstract on Polish grammar with charts of declensions and conjugations in English and Polish.
    - What I find somewhat less useful is that this set of dictionaries shows only the genitive plural of most nouns. Unfortunately, the respective forms of the nominative plural and the genitive singular are rarely presented in the dictionary. (Collins English-Polish-English dictionaries DO show these forms, however.)
    - In my experience, it makes a little more sense to show the noun's form in the genitive singular since it is often more difficult to predict the genitive singular of a Polish noun (especially for masculine nouns) than the form in the genitive plural.
    - In spite of these drawbacks, I find that this dictionary is still worth having and the newer editions would be a very good alternative to the new large dictionary that is sponsored by the Kościuszko Foundation.

    19) Berlitz Polish Dictionary: Polish-English/English-Polish (edited by Berlitz) (price: approx. $10 US)
    - In case that you can't get the medium or small dictionary by Fisiak, this dictionary from Berlitz will do in a pinch. It has the added advantage of being quite cheap
    - It does not have quite as many idioms and colloquialisms in its entries as the small dictionary published by Collins, but it does indicate the genitive singular form of every noun and the imperfective-perfective aspectual pair for every verbal entry where applicable.

    *** I do not recommend the small or medium dictionaries that are edited by Iwo Cyprian Pogonowski, With all due respect to Mr. Pogonowski, his dictionaries are little more than word lists and are not very useful for most learners of Polish. Unlike the dictionaries that are edited by Fisiak or Stanisławski et al. and the Berlitz pocket dictionary, Pogonowski does NOT indicate the genitive singular form in entries for nouns or the imperfective-perfective pairs in the entries for verbs. Instead he gives only the gender of every noun and phonetic transliterations of the Polish words. ***

ii) Online material and links to information of interest


Credits

This is a somewhat modified version of my Polish profile in the "Collaborative Writing" subforum last edited on Jan. 9, 2013 at how-to-learn-any-language.com with additional input from stelingo and Mooby.
Last edited by Chung on Tue Aug 30, 2016 3:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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stelingo
White Belt
Posts: 29
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 6:20 pm
Location: UK
Languages: English (N), French (C1), Spanish (C1), Portuguese (C1), Italian (B2), German (High B1), Russian (B1), Czech (B1), Dutch (passive B1), Catalan (passive B1), Mandarin (A2), Polish (A2/B1), Japanese (A1), Modern Standard Arabic (A1), Egyptian Arabic (A1), Turkish (Beginner). Dabbled in Swedish, Norwegian, Slovak
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Re: Proposed Polish profile

Postby stelingo » Sun Aug 21, 2016 8:52 am

I think you should mention the 800 000 Poles who live in the UK. I believe Polish is the second most spoken languages now.
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Kolik jazyků znáš, tolikrát jsi člověkem.

Mooby
White Belt
Posts: 45
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 11:43 am
Location: Scotland
Languages: Polish (B1)
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Re: Proposed Polish profile

Postby Mooby » Sun Aug 21, 2016 10:14 am

Just a typo (misspelling) of Wisława Szymborska - no 'e' in her first name.

I would also make mention of Stanisław Lem, highly acclaimed Science Fiction author, in your list.

Agree with stelingo.
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